151 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
    1. We live in an age of paradox. Systems using artificial intelligence match or surpass human level performance in more and more domains, leveraging rapid advances in other technologies and driving soaring stock prices. Yet measured productivity growth has fallen in half over the past decade, and real income has stagnated since the late 1990s for a majority of Americans. Brynjolfsson, Rock, and Syverson describe four potential explanations for this clash of expectations and statistics: false hopes, mismeasurement, redistribution, and implementation lags. While a case can be made for each explanation, the researchers argue that lags are likely to be the biggest reason for paradox. The most impressive capabilities of AI, particularly those based on machine learning, have not yet diffused widely. More importantly, like other general purpose technologies, their full effects won't be realized until waves of complementary innovations are developed and implemented. The adjustment costs, organizational changes and new skills needed for successful AI can be modeled as a kind of intangible capital. A portion of the value of this intangible capital is already reflected in the market value of firms. However, most national statistics will fail to capture the full benefits of the new technologies and some may even have the wrong sign

      This is for anyone who is looking deep in economics of artificial intelligence or is doing a project on AI with respect to economics. This paper entails how AI might effect our economy and change the way we think about work. the predictions and facts which are stated here are really impressive like how people 30 years from now will be lively with government employment where everyone will get equal amount of payment.

  2. Aug 2019
    1. ce. We conclude with a discussion of directions for future research aimed at incorporating comments in the content design pro-cess and for enhancing the user’s experience via new design features in commenting platforms.

      changes in the interface itself could transform the situation

    1. computational techniques can improve upon and enhance existingapproaches, providing more efficient ways of identifying some typesof anomalies and providing a historical picture of the evolution oflanguage and activity over time

      mixed methods are necessary in the digital age

  3. Jul 2019
  4. Jun 2019
  5. Apr 2019
    1. Having our children memorize facts and figures, sit passively in class, and take mundane standardized tests completely defeats the purpose.

      To learn with enjoyment, we need to have the space to explore, experiment and fail. We need to have ownership, empowerment and the ability to be creative in the process.

    2. how much of what I learned was never actually useful later in life, and how many of my critical lessons for success I had to pick up on my own

      How relevant is the content education delivers for real-life scenarios?

      I have been there too, most of the relevant lessons and knowledge I have discovered myself in a inquisitive and curiosity quest to learn and understand more.

    1. Hemmes lifts lid on project APRIL 03, 2019 Pub titan Justin Hemmes’s $1.5 billion redevelopment will dominate a Sydney city block, taking up to seven years to complete, with world-class local and international architects engaging in a design competition for the proposed five-star extravaganza. In his first interview on the yet-to-be-named project, the billionaire said he planned a 52,500sq m tower opposite Wynyard Station, amalgamating his Ivy party palace and adding a substantial office component, a luxury hotel and an opulent hospitality precinct.

      Awesome news. This MUST be rolled into Crossrail/West Metro planning works.

    1. D. Christopher Brooks, Director of Research, and Mark McCormack, Senior Director of Analytics & Research, at EDUCAUSE bring together this comprehensive report that outlines Higher Education trends for 2019. This report does feel more technical in nature, but they bring it together in a way that is laid out to be reader friendly. The 20-year technology predictions are valuable and there is a focus on using the report to plan for the future.

      Rating: 10/10

  6. Mar 2019
    1. The nature of the industry is likely to change dramatically in the future with the introduction of autonomous vehicles. Uber recently announced it will launch a fleet of autonomous cars in Pittsburgh this year, with the hope of eventually replacing all human “driver-partners” with self-driving cars

      the future of ridesharing compNIES, WANT TO GET DRIVERLESS CARS in order to get 100% profit.

    2. suggest areas for researchincludingthe move toward driverless cars

      future

  7. Feb 2019
    1. Modularized and Disaggregated Degrees

      This will continue to grow, in my opinion, because we are trying to prepare students for jobs that haven't even been created yet. Therefore, I see students that will build their own degrees for jobs that they want to create once they move into the workforce. Exciting!

  8. Dec 2018
  9. Nov 2018
    1. Of 25 responding early-career hospitalists, 23 (92%) rated the SCA role as useful to very useful, 20 (80%) reported interactions with the SCA led to at least one change in their diagnostic approach, and 13 (52%) reported calling fewer subspecialty consults as a result of guidance from the SCA. In response to questions about professional development, 18 (72%) felt more comfortable as an independent physician following their interactions with the SCA, and 19 (76%) thought the interactions improved the quality of care they delivered.
    2. o better understand the impact and generalizability of clinical coaching, a larger, longitudinal study is required to look at patient and provider outcomes in detail. Further refinement of the SCA role to meet faculty needs is needed and could include faculty development.
    3. For most physicians, the period of official apprenticeship ends with the completion of residency or fellowship, yet the acquisition of expertise requires ongoing opportunities to practice a given skill and obtain structured feedback on one’s performance.
    1. Hospitalists need to continue to take C-suite positions at hospitals and policy roles at think tanks and governmental agencies. They need to continue to master technology, clinical care, and the ever-growing importance of where those two intersect. Most of all, the field can’t get lazy. Otherwise, the “better mousetrap” of HM might one day be replaced by the next group of physicians willing to work harder to implement their great idea. “If we continue to be the vanguard of innovation, the vanguard of making the system work better than it ever has before,” Dr. Wachter says, “the field that creates new models of care, that integrates technology in new ways, and that has this can-do attitude and optimism, then the sky is the limit.”
    2. At a time of once-in-a-generation reform to healthcare in this country, the leaders of HM can’t afford to rest on their laurels, says Dr. Goldman. Three years ago, he wrote a paper for the Journal of Hospital Medicine titled “An Intellectual Agenda for Hospitalists.” In short, Dr. Goldman would like to see hospitalists move more into advancing science themselves rather than implementing the scientific discoveries of others. He cautions anyone against taking that as criticism of the field. “If hospitalists are going to be the people who implement what other people have found, they run the risk of being the ones who make sure everybody gets perioperative beta-blockers even if they don’t really work,” he says. “If you want to take it to the illogical extreme, you could have people who were experts in how most efficiently to do bloodletting. “The future for hospitalists, if they’re going to get to the next level—I think they can and will—is that they have to be in the discovery zone as well as the implementation zone.” Dr. Wachter says it’s about staying ahead of the curve. For 20 years, the field has been on the cutting edge of how hospitals treat patients. To grow even more, it will be crucial to keep that focus.

      Hospitalists can learn these skills through residency and fellowship training. In addition, through mentorship models that create evergrowing

    3. And while hospitalists have already moved into post-acute-care settings, Dr. Bessler says that will become an even bigger focus in the next 20 years of the specialty. “It’s not generally been the psyche of the hospitalist in the past to feel accountable beyond the walls of the hospital,” he says. “But between episodic care [and] bundled payments … you can’t just wash your hands of it. You have to understand your next site-of-care decision. You need to make sure care happens at the right location.”
    4. Dr. Gandhi, who was finishing her second year of residency at Duke Medical Center in Raleigh, N.C., when the NEJM paper was published, sees the acuity of patients getting worse in the coming years as America rapidly ages. Baby boomers will start turning 80 in the next decade, and longer life spans translate to increasing medical problems that will often require hospitalization.
    5. So what now? For all the talk of SHM’s success, HM’s positive impacts, and the specialty’s rocket growth trajectory, the work isn’t done, industry leaders say. Hospitalists are not just working toward a more valuable delivery of care, they’re also increasingly viewed as leaders of projects all around the hospital because, well, they are always there, according to Dr. Gandhi. “Hospitalists really are a leader in the hospital around quality and safety issues because they are there on the wards all the time,” she says. “They really have an interest in being the physician champions around various initiatives, so [in my hospital tenures] I partnered with many of my hospitalist colleagues on ways to improve care, such as test-result management, medication reconciliation, and similar efforts. We often would establish multidisciplinary committees to work on things, and almost always there was a hospitalist who was chairing or co-chairing or participating very actively in that group.”
    6. Dr. Bessler says that as HMGs continued to focus on improving quality and lowering costs, they had little choice but to get involved in activities outside the hospital. “We got into post-acute medicines because there was an abyss in quality,” he says. “We were accountable to send patients out, and there was nobody to send them to. Or the quality of the facilities was terrible, or the docs or clinicians weren’t going to see those patients regularly. That’s how we got into solving post-acute.”
    7. “The day is upon us where we need to strongly consider nurse practitioners and physician assistants as equal in the field,” he says. “We’re going to find a much better continuity of care for all our patients at various institutions with hospital medicine and … a nurse practitioner who is at the top of their license.”

      Hospitalists as QB should play leadership role in integrating all members of care team

    8. Recent State of Hospital Medicine surveys showed that 83% of hospitalist groups are utilizing NPs and PAs, and SHM earlier this year added Tracy Cardin, ACNP-BC, SFHM, as its first non-physician voting board member
    9. “To me, this is the new frontier,” Dr. Wachter says. “If our defining mantra as a field is, ‘How do we make care better for patients, and how do we create a better system?’ … well, I don’t see how you say that without really owning the issue of informatics.”
    10. SHM’s Information Technology Committee, believes that hospitalists have to take ownership of health information technology (HIT) in their own buildings.
      • Kendall Rogers = Chair of SHM Information Technology Committee
      • Future role of hospitalist = QI initiatives, health information technology
      • Training needs, fellowship curricular components
    11. Dr. Bessler of Sound Physicians notes that advances in technology have come with their hurdles as well. Take the oft-maligned world of electronic medical records (EMRs). “EMRs are great for data, but they’re not workflow solutions,” Dr. Bessler says. “They don’t tell you what do next.” So Sound Physicians created its own technology platform, dubbed Sound Connect, that interacts with in-place EMRs at hospitals across the country. The in-house system takes the functional documentation of EMRs and overlays productivity protocols, Dr. Bessler says. “It allows us to run a standard workflow and drive reproducible results and put meaningful data in the hands of the docs on a daily basis in the way that an EMR is just not set up to do,” he adds. Technology will continue “to be instrumental, of course, but I think the key thing is interoperability, which plenty has been written on, so we’re not unique in that. The more the public demands and the clinicians demand … the better patient care will be. I think the concept of EMR companies not being easy to work with has to end.”

      Biggest challenge will be integration of different technological solutions and sources of data - workflows for delivering care and for research purposes (e.g., person-level QI initiatives, passive baseline data)

    1. Poor health literacy is a silent and ubiquitous health care issue, and the field of neurosurgery is particularly prone to the consequent adverse effects. Failure to address low health literacy has several detrimental health and economic consequences, and numerous policies have been initiated to address these. Better facilitating patient understanding of neurosurgical disease, treatment options, and care surrounding the operative period may have a positive impact on the health care economy and ultimately achieve improved outcomes for patients.

      Certain disciplines are particularly prone to consequent adverse effects of poor health literacy.

    1. Beyond the Frame: The New Classroom

      In this video a discussion of how the school system is broken but cost billions of dollars. 9 billion dollars a year is spent of textbooks that become outdated the minute they are printed according to the author.

      With the new generation of learners, virtual reality will be embracing how most learners learn the best by visual means and not by reading.

      This video short impactfully presents how VR will change the face of education.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  10. Oct 2018
    1. forensically informed, interdiscipli-nary approach that integrates neuropsychiat-ric, neuropsychological, and psychophysiologi-cal methods for the study of brain localisation,social cognition, and emotional processing

      can such a large study be done?

    2. neuropsychiatric evaluation of violentpatients should include clinical assessment forfrontal lobe impairment and neuropsychologi-cal evaluation of executive functions,
    3. Accurate measurement of theincreased risk of violence in subjects with pre-frontal dysfunction also requires comparisonwith rates of aggression in appropriate controls

      different brain impairments = different levels of anger?

    4. future studies testing the relation betweenfrontal lobe dysfunction and aggression shouldincorporate controls for known risk factorscontributing to violent behaviour

      good solution, but there's sOOO many factors to consider

    1. As the power is unleashed, computers on the Semantic Web achieve at first the ability to describe, then to infer, and then to reason. The schema is a huge step, and one that will enable a vast amount of interoperability and extra functionality. However, it still only categorizes data. It says nothing about meaning or understanding.

      The author presents an interesting progression for the Web to eventually learn to reason. The picture he paints of more accessible content on the internet hinges on the internet learning to reason, which is a human characteristic. It seems we need to apply human characteristics to all of our mechanics for them to progress in their usefulness.

    1. having children is a privilege that has been historically denied to many nonwhite and nonafflu-ent people.

      The idea of "no future"/ "declining to reproduce the Child" doesn't do anything to help indigenous people because having children is an act that has been regulated for indigenous people. Settler colonialism/white supremacy does not want indigenous people to create future generations so having a child could be seen as a radical act for indigenous people.

  11. Sep 2018
    1. Snap is also confident that it can reach a high amount of new voters: 80 percent of its users are over 18, so this campaign won't just fall on well-meaning (but still too young) thumbs.

      Each vote counts and our votes determine our future. If we all vote for what we want we can have a better future and not complain about why our community is bad.

    1. keenest attachments, and whose natural gifts may be, if we do not squander or destroy them, exactly what we need to flourish and perfect ourselves—as human beings.

      Kass' implications in the quote indicates the potential biotechnology has on the human psyche. Although biotechnology has the ability to forge new paths in curing feeble human (or in essence, any living thing) traits, such as sickness and suffering, it can be further exploited to enhance physical traits. However, Kass' tonality shines light that when this technology is fully developed, humans will lose sight of what they formerly relied on "keenest attachments" Therefore, it is of great significance that the limbs (keenest attachments) are used to "...perfect ourselves-as human beings." and not misused or ultimately destroyed.

  12. Aug 2018
    1. Động thái một loạt ông lớn như Vingroup, Viettel, FPT, VNPT, Phenikaa… công bố các dự án thúc đẩy đầu tư cho khoa học, công nghệ trùng hợp với sự kiện 100 nhân tài trẻ nước ngoài trở về tham gia Chương trình Kết nối mạng lưới đổi mới sáng tạo Việt Nam 2018 đã thổi bùng niềm tin về một công cuộc vĩ đại đánh thức các tiềm lực mới cho phát triển kinh tế.
  13. Jul 2018
    1. appointment. Time chunksopen up the possibility for future-oriented temporal manipulation and valuation; they assumethat we are able to know, in advance, the duration of tasks and experiences.

      How does the idea of time chunks and future-orientation fit with:

      Reddy's temporal horizon concept? Zimbardo's future time perspective?

    1. tries (Prado 2013). Here again, instead of looking at the present as a heterogeneous context, the present isconsidered as uniform and following a linear trajectory toward

      This is an important caveat for the study of sociotemporality in humanitarian crises. Need to stay grounded in the present and how even some immediate, incremental steps toward improving the representation of time in the data and in the data gathering process can be serve the larger, future goals of attaining real-time situational awareness.

  14. Jun 2018
    1. Text is not going away, but if we really want it to be understood and remembered, we should integrate it better with physical and emotional experience. This convergence may happen with the “physicalization” of the digital world, where digital experiences become part of our physical life.

      Como nos filmes, será que um dia a Web vai extrapolar o digital e ir para o mundo físico?

    1. The possibilities of this storytelling technique are demonstrated by its transference into real-life projects, such as the immersive model that his production company, 5D GlobalStudio, developed for Al Baydha, a Bedouin village in Saudi Arabia.

      In order for Alex McDowell to think of the asthetics of a possible future city, he had to use a reference project in saudi arabia. Offering options to make a rural community in a village in Saudi Arabia more efficient in different ways made it possible for him to create a (better) future Detroit.

  15. May 2018
    1. Offering consultation services to clients is no longer optional in a world where websites can be generated by Squarespace and other white label services.
    2. The model of future successful brand agencies is a hybrid approach of digital and brand, neither one prioritized over the other.
    3. While none of these are a traditional logo, each of them represents a touch point between a human and a brand. Just like a logo, these types of interactions represent the tip of the iceberg of a brand. These days, a brand mark does not need to be visual–touch, interaction, or sound can equally be a brand mark.
    4. At a time when brand experiences are often based upon touch, sound, and voice, how can a branding process that starts out from a purely visual perspective ever possibly succeed?
  16. Apr 2018
    1. In the short term, digital design will move beyond screens to physical surfaces and augmented or artificial environments, and designers will occupy more positions where they are directing or consulting on larger and more complex systems of experience. Design is already less visual and more collaborative, and will continue along that trend. It’s not enough, though, to look five or ten years in the future. Will there be a Machine-Learning designer in 2050? Maybe. But in forty years, it’s just as likely that jobs will no longer exist, or at least not in a way that we would recognize them.
    1. The present is sticky.  The Long Now became the Long Right Now, somehow. This is not what we had in mind when we philosophised about atemporality, but it's probably what we deserved.
  17. Feb 2018
    1. This is their ‘afterlife’!” They successfully transmitted some essence of their life to a world far beyond their own.

      This is a very interesting way to think about it. Maybe we need to make sure we leave similar such traces behind.

  18. Jan 2018
    1. Belong to us and to our children — Are the proper objects of our inquiries, that thereby we may know our duty, and, by complying with it, may be kept from such terrible calamities as these now mentioned.

      Proper objects of our attention and effort. Let us not waste time inquiring after things that are beyond us or that have to do with God's sovereignty and design.

  19. Dec 2017
    1. The head of a small university’s "academic innovation" office explains why that phrase isn’t a contradiction in terms, and how the office helps professors amplify creative approaches to teaching and learning.
    1. What happened this year that will still matter in 2022? Digital learning experts weigh in.
    2. faculty as guides for students toward knowledge and mastery

      a real understanding of and commitment to info lit is key here.

  20. Oct 2017
    1. it also turns out that neural networks and data mining in general are really good at reinforcing the prejudices of their programmers, and embedding them in hardware. Here's a racist hand dryer — it's proximity sensor simply doesn't work on dark skin! Engineers with untested assumptions about the human subjects of their machines can wreak havoc.)

      racism? in my algorithms because of the biases of the people who designed them? it's more likely than you think.

    1. People with scientific training are adopting these practices as well, either by offering services on sites such as Upwork or finding projects through their previous academic networks.
    1. I can’t go on

      but I must go on!. Is this the future we are heading towards?

    1. I take as given the evidence that human beings are irrevocably altering the conditions for life on Earth and that, despite certain unpredictabilities, we live at the cusp of a mass extinction. What is the place of digital humanities (DH) practice in the new social and geological era of the Anthropocene? What are the DH community’s most significant responsibilities, and to whom?

      While the thought of this is incredibly depressing, it does open up questions as to the place of DH. Personally, I think the DH community's most significant responsibilities are to record life on earth as we know it now, how we as humans are endangering it and suggesting ways to actively preserve it. I believe keeping a record or an archive of plants and animals that are in danger of becoming extinct (for example) is incredibly important for future generations to come and this is who DH must aim to speak to: future generations.

    1. c = np.full((2,2), 7) # Create a constant array print(c)

      To avoid the warning, use

      np.full((2,2), 7.) or use explicitly for float np.full((2,2),7, dtype=float) or for int np.full((2,2),7, dtype=int)

  21. Sep 2017
    1. that to secure Ourselves where we are, we must tread with awfull reverence in the footsteps of Our fathers.

      The word "secure" demonstrates a need for status and purpose. This seems interesting in reflecting on the document as a whole, which is essentially a declaration of establishment and is securing the meaning of the university. "Tread with awful reverence" prompts a reflection upon what is considered a good and valuable life in this situation. Do we need to keep this reverence in mind with all decisions that come with the progression of the school? Tana Mardian

  22. Jul 2017
    1. The underlying lesson of the basics was about the social order and its sources of authority, a lesson which was appropriate for a society which expected its workers to be passively disciplined.

      preparing our students for jobs that may not yet exist.

    1. With our extensive prior knowledge derived from offline reading, we naturally interpret this standard, using a lens to our past, and teach infer-ential reasoning with narrative text offline.
    1. But further than that, at a fundamental level, graphic design works as a kind of user interface; we organize information visually to allow people to navigate through and understand the world. As graphic designers we channel interactions through a primarily visual funnel, stripping out everything that can’t be accommodated in the medium. But as sensors, processing power and machine intelligence become more portable, ubiquitous, and increasingly part of the designer’s lexicon, we will one day find that our user interfaces are no longer primarily visual, but more sonic, haptic, and multi-sensory. With that comes a brand new palette of output at our disposal. Allow me to take this to a more extreme conclusion: We’re beginning to interface with our devices in more conversational terms as natural-language-processing algorithms improve, and in more gestural terms with improvements in computer vision and virtual reality. When coupled with renewed interest in anticipatory design, a massive signal appears pointing to a future in which graphic designers are barely required at all. But by taking a designer’s mindset to problem-framing and solving, we have skills that position us well to help shape the deployment and development of this new artificial intelligence in design; helping to develop new tools, new interfaces, and new interactions that shape future worlds in unimaginably profound ways.
    1. Application developers will also likely win in all this. While the APIs and the data available will be pretty standardized, the manner in which it’s displayed will become a battleground of creativity. Innovation here will be key, doing something different and better than what everyone else is doing is the only way an app will stand out.
    2. If there’s a definite winner in this possible future Internet, it is the content creators. If the only thing that sets one company or organization apart from their competition, then those who can create high-quality content will be in high demand. The thousands of dollars that a company used to be spent on website design will be funneled into website content instead.
    3. Multimedia content will also still have a strong market. Those who can produce high-quality videos and even web-based apps (for things like Chrome OS) will have a strong business for years to come.
    1. And all these touchpoints need to be designed, planned, and managed. This is a job that will continue to exist, regardless of the channel. We will still need cohesive experiences and valuable content across smart climatizers, virtual reality devices, electronic contact lenses, and whatever we invent in the decades to come.
  23. May 2017
    1. Alaska's Future

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. Alaska's Future

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

  24. Apr 2017
    1. p. 13

      Overall much of the literature regarding electronic mailing lists has been either speculative or anecdotal in nature. In addition, as will be noted later, there has been a tencency to be overly optimistic in reporting the benefits of computer mediated communication. This lack of inquiry into the evolution of electronic mailing lists has left a crticial gap in the social history of academic culture.

    2. pp. 8-9 Important statement of potentially radical questions

      Today;s scholars are no longer limited to print and conferences if they want to share their work with others. Electronic media liberate text from the technological limitations of paper and the costs of travel. By using computer mediated communication, scholars can communicate with their peers as they never could before. While this is an exciting time, the implications for scholarly communication, the evolition of the knowledge base, and learning behaviors and not yet known. It is important to questions how truly transforming or revliation the impact of computer mediarted communication was for scholarlship as it was beginning to rake root in the academic communitiy. The electronic mailing lists provided the first insight to how a worldwide communication forum could work... Will scholars merely view electronic mailing lists as a more speedy and cost-effective means to distribute information (such as calls for papers) that was traditionally disseminated in print? Or will electronic mailing lists and other forms of computer mediated communication ultimately transform scholarly behavior? Will the need to attend professional conferences cease because the same exchanges can be done via computer?

    3. p. 5

      The origin of many of our big questions in Schol Comm (peer review, etc.) can be found in lists:

      The origins of these questions began with the early electronic mailing lists.

    4. p. 3

      the electronic mailing lists I studied formed the basis of new ideas for the future of scholarly communication.

    5. p. 1 Epigraph

      I think that we are in the nascent stages of this. I think that this could be an extraordinarily effective tool for scholarly interchange around the world, as well as personal interchange. We have not yet figured out how to make it work the best possible way. What we are seeing on these discussions lists of [sic][sic] whatever that are, is a kind of groping through the dark to figure out what works and what doesn't work. I just see it in those lights and so I don't get upset about some things that go on. It will all work out one way or another." (history, Professor)

    6. Abstract

      The dissertation also considers the implications for higher education and the extent to which electronic mailing lists may change scholarly behaviors.

  25. Mar 2017
    1. In many ways, it’s precisely this union of science and magic that needs to be bottled and tirelessly cultivated if VR is to win the favor of mass audiences.
  26. Jan 2017
    1. Richardson, Lawver, Ross, and Meeter are the future politicians, activists, educators, writers,entrepreneurs, and media makers.

      It is insane to see such success out of young kids with the use of technology

    2. Educators must work together to ensure that every American young person has access to theskills and experiences needed to become a full participant, can articulate their understanding of

      The shift in generations and their view on the media is very clear. When I was in school (not college) we would stray away from the use of technology and media. Now, you see elementary and middle school students with laptops.

  27. Nov 2016
  28. Oct 2016
    1. High-end digital products that directly or indirectly improve student outcomes Related services that help colleges improve student outcomes Services that help colleges improve the unsexy but critical aspects staying viable, from marketing to administration Loans to schools looking to make changes that will (theoretically) make them more sustainable in the long run but require significant up-front investment—preferably in the products and services of the company offering the loan
    1. Consider Phlebas, who was once handsome and tall as you.

      A reference to the cards that were drawn within the first book, as well as the line implying that great things that once were, are fading,

  29. Sep 2016
    1. The other problem is that the AI crowd seems to be assuming that people who might exist in the future should be counted equally to people who definitely exist today. That's by no means an obvious position, and tons of philosophers dispute it. Among other things, it implies what's known as the Repugnant Conclusion: the idea that the world should keep increasing its population until the absolutely maximum number of humans are alive, living lives that are just barely worth living. But if you say that people who only might exist count less than people who really do or really will exist, you avoid that conclusion, and the case for caring only about the far future becomes considerably weaker

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. If "social memory" can be defined as "how and what social groups remember," then digital culture, as Richard Rinehart and Jon Ippolito point out, changes both the how and the what of social memory.
    1. Even some of the world's largest companies live in constant "fear of Google"; sudden banishment from search results, YouTube, AdWords, Adsense, or a dozen other Alphabet-owned platforms can be devastating.
    1. The Future of the Professions: How Technology Will Transform the Work of Human Experts
    2. “The Future of Employment: How Susceptible Are Jobs to Computerisation?”
    3. It is by now close to certain that there are millions of people currently in high school and college who are fine-tuning their skills for steady-looking careers that will, following technological breakthroughs, dissipate by the time they retire.
    1. We commonly look at Ivy League institutions as the standard of higher education in America, but the truth is that the majority of the nation's workforce, innovation identity and manufacturing futures are tied to those institutions which graduate outside of the realm of high achievers from wealthy families. 
  30. Jul 2016
  31. Jun 2016
    1. The War on Stupid People

      Lots of difficult things with this text, including the title. The obsession on measurable “smarts” is an important topic and the possible measures to prevent this obsession from impacting (US) society make sense. But it’s really tricky to discuss intelligence in such ways. Part of the text reads as further essentialisation of measured intelligence. Yet it sounds clear from the possible measures described that this form of intelligence takes at least part of its meaning in a given social context.

      Maybe the deep issue with a text like this is that it’s hard to get people to shift from one consistent mindframe (paradigm, episteme) to another. More specifically, it’s hard to discuss intelligence in a context where the concept has become so loaded.

      Would have lots more to say about this from my parents’ experiences (an occupational therapist who spent a career with people labelled as having “intellectual disabilities” and a psychopedagogue who worked in “special education” with students from a low-income neighbourhood who had “learning disabilities”). Maybe later.

  32. May 2016
    1. Why do we suddenly pretend that the twenty-first century never happened when a child enters an examination room?
    2. rather than having an education system which has been industrialised around content and testing, why not have one that’s based around solving problems, working together, collaborating?
  33. Apr 2016
    1. “fundamentally if we want to realize the potential of human networks to change how we work then we need analytics to transform information into insight otherwise we will be drowning in a sea of content and deafened by a cacophony of voices”

      Marie Wallace's perspective on the potential of bigdata analytics, specifically analysis of human networks, in the context of creating a smarter workplace.

  34. Mar 2016
    1. The commoners who participate are just as importantly the commons, making it a dynamic and evolving eco-system.

      Love this phrase! A prevailing sense at this workshop was that not just the PhD's inhabit the commons; everyone does.

  35. Feb 2016
    1. Technology can help students fill in the vast blank spaces on their mental maps. But it cannot, on its own, create a safe space that encourages kids to ask tough questions.
  36. Dec 2015
    1. from plantations. If that were to increase to 75 percent, the logged area of natural forests could drop in half.” Meanwhile the consumption of all wood has leveled off---for fuel, buildings, and, finally, paper. We are at peak timber.
  37. Nov 2015
    1. RAJ: Paul, “sooner or later” doesn’t matter. You cannot deal in the future at the present time. Therefore, you should not govern your feelings on the basis of a future that you imagine may be.

      Do not be distracted by fear of future events.

  38. Oct 2015
    1. Paul, there most certainly is an intent or purpose, a Divine Purpose, being fulfilled today. However, it is far from what it appears to be from a three-dimensional standpoint. I know that you have really no more idea what is going to happen as the day finishes out than you do when you begin a healing session, than you do when we begin a conversation, or than you do when you lay out the Tarot cards. Do not let that concern you. Just stay where you are and observe the Divine Purpose fulfill Itself. You have trusted me before when you weren’t even sure I was real. I am saying now, again, “Trust me.” And I can see that you do trust even more.

      Things are not the way they appear.

      We have no idea of how the next moment will unfold.

      Trust and observe Divine purpose fulfill itself.

    1. Vast infrastructural projects, including dams and highways—again, all debt-financed—are transforming the landscape.

      "all debt-financed" .... have we thought about the long term effect of this system?

  39. Sep 2015
  40. Jun 2015
    1. I would like the page-based approach first. When I downloaded the add-on, this was the feature I was expecting to use, which made me very excited. It was like Disqus, only more perfect, because the comments could be directly and seamlessly linked to specific parts of pages. Additionally, this was possible on any webpage or PDF document. Anyone could share ideas and reactions with others, anywhere. An added plus was to be going on random web pages, looking for citations that people had made there. It felt like a whole new hidden layer of the internet was put into place, and with it came the delight of discovering where said layer had manifested itself. That was something I thought was special.

      The plans on this document look perfect. When can we expect for them to be implemented?

  41. May 2015
    1. The idea of a sensing package, a bundle of constitutive, participatory tendrils, may help press past commonplace conditional observations — e.g., that rhetorical activity is embodied — and could offer a way to think about connective, participatory dimensions of sensing. This I think is where sensation can go. But where has it been?
  42. Feb 2015