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  1. Last 7 days
  2. May 2020
    1. In addition, the UK should take the opportunity to leverage its strong research and development base to identify globally competitive products and services, and evaluate where we have opportunities to make these products in the UK and export globally.

      Promising

  3. Apr 2020
    1. Competition exists when there is comparison, and comparison does not bring about excellence.

      Disagree. It does once you master the "Inner Game" the way John Galway explains it. Competition then is your ally to find the best version of yourself. To do things you did not think you could because your opponent helped you bring this out of you. And so it is in Aikido and value of a good opponent.

    1. Mr. Duncombe published the results online using CommentPress, open-source software by the Institute for the Future of the Book. Online discussion and commenting is made possible by Social Book, a social-reading platform created by the institute.
    1. “The first thing he told me to try was a Vasper machine, which we have here at Upgrade Labs. We call it the Cold HIIT machine,” Tobias says in a phone interview. The Vasper manufacturer claimed that the contraption—resembling a recumbent bike with pressure- and cold-wrap sleeves for the arms and legs—could double your testosterone in two weeks. “I said that sounds pretty attractive, but it also sounds like bullshit. It sounds like Suzanne Somers and the freaking Ab Blaster or the Thigh Master thing. You've heard this in fitness a lot of times, you can do nothing and get the benefits. And so I'm pretty skeptical.”

      Tobias had his blood testosterone level tested and then did the machine three times a week for two weeks. After a total of two hours on the machine—the company recommends 21-minute high-intensity workouts—Tobias said that his testosterone went from 468 nanograms per deciliter to 1,098. (The normal range for men is between 300 and 1,100.)

      Blond influencer-types sit next to septuagenarians in plaid. Business attire blurs with athleisure. Some people look ready for Burning Man, others to present pitch decks. It’s a strange mix, but it seems fitting for a conference that offers cacao ceremonies and talks on stem-cell treatments.

    1. Someday soon, every place and thing in the real world—every street, lamppost, building, and room—will have its full-size digital twin in the mirrorworld ... We are now building such a 1:1 map of almost unimaginable scope, and this world will become the next great digital platform.

      The first big technology platform was the web, which digitized information, subjecting knowledge to the power of algorithms; it came to be dominated by Google. The second great platform was social media, running primarily on mobile phones. It digitized people and subjected human behavior and relationships to the power of algorithms, and it is ruled by Facebook and WeChat.

      We are now at the dawn of the third platform, which will digitize the rest of the world. On this platform, all things and places will be machine-­readable, subject to the power of algorithms. Whoever dominates this grand third platform will become among the wealthiest and most powerful people and companies in history, just as those who now dominate the first two platforms have.

    1. you may be more likely to work alongside a robot in the near future than have one replace you. And even better news: You’re more likely to make friends with a robot than have one murder you. Hooray for the future!
    1. This is a great time to individualize instruction and have students work at different paces. You don’t want 100-120 papers coming at you all at one time. Spread it out, and it will keep you from getting short-tempered with your students.

      As the educational system operates today, many teachers easily put in 60 hours of work per week. But when you teach remotely, it sounds like work becomes much more manageable.

      Do I want to become a teacher? If I can teach like this I do—and no, not because it seems easier but because it seems easier AND more effective.

    2. For my more advanced students, they need to learn research skills: how to locate, evaluate, and use information. Online learning offers great opportunities for that, including with what’s going on in the news right now.

      ...how to function independently in the world too.

    3. Then there is the option of getting students to talk to each other online on discussion boards and videoconferences. Some students adapt to it quickly and like it. Some don’t, because it feels impersonal. You have to be patient with that and give them some time and space to adjust.

      Introverts v extroverts. Oil and water. They've always differed, always will. Maybe this virtual, personalized learning movement will finally allow introverts to stop feeling so defeated in the presence of extroverts who live so much more loudly than they do. Finally, they'll be able to live peacefully in their own mind, undisturbed by the stress of feelings like you need to be more extroverted to fit in.

      Btw: I'm not encouraging each party to distance themselves from each other all the time. What I am saying is that when value is trying to be distributed, distribute it however it'll best be received. Then, later, once teaching time is over, they can socialize in traditional ways... IF that's what they want to do.

    4. Rizga: How have you been translating this online?Moore: It depends on the student. Some students work very well asynchronously. They are very comfortable working alone on a draft; I make color-coded comments in a word document or their PDF, and then I send it back. Some students need me to explain things to them in person before I send them the comments; we’ll do a video or audio chat. Others need even more interaction: I’ll hook them up to a videoconference, and we’ll go through all the comments together. Some students I need to refer to a grammar-brushup program or a YouTube video on how to do some of the mechanical stuff like uploading papers online.

      Sounds like Mrs. Moore deserves a raise! This woman knows what's up! She represents the future while living in a community that (probably) latches on to tradition.

      Any of you big city school systems reading this? If you are, hire her. You can probably pay her less than what your other teachers are earning and still give her a bump in pay compared to what she's earning in Mississippi.

    5. The other big issue is that many of the teachers don’t have the skills to teach online.

      Sorry, but this begs the question...

      Should teachers who don't have the skills to teach online be teaching at all? If they can't, they're either not qualified for the job or they're unwilling to put in the effort required to learn.

    6. We are in the midst of the most sweeping education experiment in history. The coronavirus pandemic has forced the majority of the U.S.’s 3.6 million educators to find ways to teach without what most of them consider the core part of their craft—the daily face-to-face interactions that help them elicit a child’s burning desire to investigate something; detect confusion or a lack of engagement; and find the right approach, based on a student’s body language and participation in the classroom, to help students work through their challenges.

      There's a reason education fails so often: teachers teach students as if they all have identical interests and learning styles.

      There's no such thing as a one-size-fits all solution to any problem. Everyone knows that. Even dumb people do. Yet there are our educators, the people we're supposed to depend on to set the table for our lives, to show us what's important, what we she commit to memory for the rest of our life or else that life's gonna die having led a dumb life, because you didn't do what you were told to do way back when: understand everything the teacher told you to understand, yeah, even if you didn't give a fuck about what's coming out of her mouth. Learn that shit anyway.

      Oh, and learn it how I say you should learn it too. Sit in that seat, lock your eyes on me, and take notes at a speed that's equal to or faster than the rate of my speech... just like all the students around you are (trying) to do... because everyone learns new information in the same way... right?

    7. Then, you have to think about accessibility issues. How will my vision-impaired and deaf students access it? Have I put everything in print? Do I have to put in some audio? There are whole series of checks you have to do for different access issues.

      Sure, new problems will surface. But so will solutions. And hopefully, in the end, there will be fewer problems using the new approach than the old.

  4. Dec 2019
    1. A simple and timeless format Plain text is the simplest file format there is. It will always be accessible, by some kind of application, forever.
  5. burnsoftware.wordpress.com burnsoftware.wordpress.com
    1. Future proofs your journal entries by saving them as plain text and organizing them as you go. This means you can read or create entries when you don’t have DayJournal.
  • Oct 2019
    1. We live in an age of paradox. Systems using artificial intelligence match or surpass human level performance in more and more domains, leveraging rapid advances in other technologies and driving soaring stock prices. Yet measured productivity growth has fallen in half over the past decade, and real income has stagnated since the late 1990s for a majority of Americans. Brynjolfsson, Rock, and Syverson describe four potential explanations for this clash of expectations and statistics: false hopes, mismeasurement, redistribution, and implementation lags. While a case can be made for each explanation, the researchers argue that lags are likely to be the biggest reason for paradox. The most impressive capabilities of AI, particularly those based on machine learning, have not yet diffused widely. More importantly, like other general purpose technologies, their full effects won't be realized until waves of complementary innovations are developed and implemented. The adjustment costs, organizational changes and new skills needed for successful AI can be modeled as a kind of intangible capital. A portion of the value of this intangible capital is already reflected in the market value of firms. However, most national statistics will fail to capture the full benefits of the new technologies and some may even have the wrong sign

      This is for anyone who is looking deep in economics of artificial intelligence or is doing a project on AI with respect to economics. This paper entails how AI might effect our economy and change the way we think about work. the predictions and facts which are stated here are really impressive like how people 30 years from now will be lively with government employment where everyone will get equal amount of payment.

  • Aug 2019
    1. ce. We conclude with a discussion of directions for future research aimed at incorporating comments in the content design pro-cess and for enhancing the user’s experience via new design features in commenting platforms.

      changes in the interface itself could transform the situation

    1. computational techniques can improve upon and enhance existingapproaches, providing more efficient ways of identifying some typesof anomalies and providing a historical picture of the evolution oflanguage and activity over time

      mixed methods are necessary in the digital age

  • Jul 2019
  • Jun 2019
  • Apr 2019
    1. Having our children memorize facts and figures, sit passively in class, and take mundane standardized tests completely defeats the purpose.

      To learn with enjoyment, we need to have the space to explore, experiment and fail. We need to have ownership, empowerment and the ability to be creative in the process.

    2. how much of what I learned was never actually useful later in life, and how many of my critical lessons for success I had to pick up on my own

      How relevant is the content education delivers for real-life scenarios?

      I have been there too, most of the relevant lessons and knowledge I have discovered myself in a inquisitive and curiosity quest to learn and understand more.

    1. Hemmes lifts lid on project APRIL 03, 2019 Pub titan Justin Hemmes’s $1.5 billion redevelopment will dominate a Sydney city block, taking up to seven years to complete, with world-class local and international architects engaging in a design competition for the proposed five-star extravaganza. In his first interview on the yet-to-be-named project, the billionaire said he planned a 52,500sq m tower opposite Wynyard Station, amalgamating his Ivy party palace and adding a substantial office component, a luxury hotel and an opulent hospitality precinct.

      Awesome news. This MUST be rolled into Crossrail/West Metro planning works.

    1. D. Christopher Brooks, Director of Research, and Mark McCormack, Senior Director of Analytics & Research, at EDUCAUSE bring together this comprehensive report that outlines Higher Education trends for 2019. This report does feel more technical in nature, but they bring it together in a way that is laid out to be reader friendly. The 20-year technology predictions are valuable and there is a focus on using the report to plan for the future.

      Rating: 10/10

  • Mar 2019
    1. The nature of the industry is likely to change dramatically in the future with the introduction of autonomous vehicles. Uber recently announced it will launch a fleet of autonomous cars in Pittsburgh this year, with the hope of eventually replacing all human “driver-partners” with self-driving cars

      the future of ridesharing compNIES, WANT TO GET DRIVERLESS CARS in order to get 100% profit.

    2. suggest areas for researchincludingthe move toward driverless cars

      future

  • Feb 2019
    1. Modularized and Disaggregated Degrees

      This will continue to grow, in my opinion, because we are trying to prepare students for jobs that haven't even been created yet. Therefore, I see students that will build their own degrees for jobs that they want to create once they move into the workforce. Exciting!

  • Dec 2018
  • Nov 2018
    1. Of 25 responding early-career hospitalists, 23 (92%) rated the SCA role as useful to very useful, 20 (80%) reported interactions with the SCA led to at least one change in their diagnostic approach, and 13 (52%) reported calling fewer subspecialty consults as a result of guidance from the SCA. In response to questions about professional development, 18 (72%) felt more comfortable as an independent physician following their interactions with the SCA, and 19 (76%) thought the interactions improved the quality of care they delivered.
    2. o better understand the impact and generalizability of clinical coaching, a larger, longitudinal study is required to look at patient and provider outcomes in detail. Further refinement of the SCA role to meet faculty needs is needed and could include faculty development.
    3. For most physicians, the period of official apprenticeship ends with the completion of residency or fellowship, yet the acquisition of expertise requires ongoing opportunities to practice a given skill and obtain structured feedback on one’s performance.
    1. Hospitalists need to continue to take C-suite positions at hospitals and policy roles at think tanks and governmental agencies. They need to continue to master technology, clinical care, and the ever-growing importance of where those two intersect. Most of all, the field can’t get lazy. Otherwise, the “better mousetrap” of HM might one day be replaced by the next group of physicians willing to work harder to implement their great idea. “If we continue to be the vanguard of innovation, the vanguard of making the system work better than it ever has before,” Dr. Wachter says, “the field that creates new models of care, that integrates technology in new ways, and that has this can-do attitude and optimism, then the sky is the limit.”
    2. At a time of once-in-a-generation reform to healthcare in this country, the leaders of HM can’t afford to rest on their laurels, says Dr. Goldman. Three years ago, he wrote a paper for the Journal of Hospital Medicine titled “An Intellectual Agenda for Hospitalists.” In short, Dr. Goldman would like to see hospitalists move more into advancing science themselves rather than implementing the scientific discoveries of others. He cautions anyone against taking that as criticism of the field. “If hospitalists are going to be the people who implement what other people have found, they run the risk of being the ones who make sure everybody gets perioperative beta-blockers even if they don’t really work,” he says. “If you want to take it to the illogical extreme, you could have people who were experts in how most efficiently to do bloodletting. “The future for hospitalists, if they’re going to get to the next level—I think they can and will—is that they have to be in the discovery zone as well as the implementation zone.” Dr. Wachter says it’s about staying ahead of the curve. For 20 years, the field has been on the cutting edge of how hospitals treat patients. To grow even more, it will be crucial to keep that focus.

      Hospitalists can learn these skills through residency and fellowship training. In addition, through mentorship models that create evergrowing

    3. And while hospitalists have already moved into post-acute-care settings, Dr. Bessler says that will become an even bigger focus in the next 20 years of the specialty. “It’s not generally been the psyche of the hospitalist in the past to feel accountable beyond the walls of the hospital,” he says. “But between episodic care [and] bundled payments … you can’t just wash your hands of it. You have to understand your next site-of-care decision. You need to make sure care happens at the right location.”
    4. Dr. Gandhi, who was finishing her second year of residency at Duke Medical Center in Raleigh, N.C., when the NEJM paper was published, sees the acuity of patients getting worse in the coming years as America rapidly ages. Baby boomers will start turning 80 in the next decade, and longer life spans translate to increasing medical problems that will often require hospitalization.
    5. So what now? For all the talk of SHM’s success, HM’s positive impacts, and the specialty’s rocket growth trajectory, the work isn’t done, industry leaders say. Hospitalists are not just working toward a more valuable delivery of care, they’re also increasingly viewed as leaders of projects all around the hospital because, well, they are always there, according to Dr. Gandhi. “Hospitalists really are a leader in the hospital around quality and safety issues because they are there on the wards all the time,” she says. “They really have an interest in being the physician champions around various initiatives, so [in my hospital tenures] I partnered with many of my hospitalist colleagues on ways to improve care, such as test-result management, medication reconciliation, and similar efforts. We often would establish multidisciplinary committees to work on things, and almost always there was a hospitalist who was chairing or co-chairing or participating very actively in that group.”
    6. Dr. Bessler says that as HMGs continued to focus on improving quality and lowering costs, they had little choice but to get involved in activities outside the hospital. “We got into post-acute medicines because there was an abyss in quality,” he says. “We were accountable to send patients out, and there was nobody to send them to. Or the quality of the facilities was terrible, or the docs or clinicians weren’t going to see those patients regularly. That’s how we got into solving post-acute.”
    7. “The day is upon us where we need to strongly consider nurse practitioners and physician assistants as equal in the field,” he says. “We’re going to find a much better continuity of care for all our patients at various institutions with hospital medicine and … a nurse practitioner who is at the top of their license.”

      Hospitalists as QB should play leadership role in integrating all members of care team

    8. Recent State of Hospital Medicine surveys showed that 83% of hospitalist groups are utilizing NPs and PAs, and SHM earlier this year added Tracy Cardin, ACNP-BC, SFHM, as its first non-physician voting board member
    9. “To me, this is the new frontier,” Dr. Wachter says. “If our defining mantra as a field is, ‘How do we make care better for patients, and how do we create a better system?’ … well, I don’t see how you say that without really owning the issue of informatics.”
    10. SHM’s Information Technology Committee, believes that hospitalists have to take ownership of health information technology (HIT) in their own buildings.
      • Kendall Rogers = Chair of SHM Information Technology Committee
      • Future role of hospitalist = QI initiatives, health information technology
      • Training needs, fellowship curricular components
    11. Dr. Bessler of Sound Physicians notes that advances in technology have come with their hurdles as well. Take the oft-maligned world of electronic medical records (EMRs). “EMRs are great for data, but they’re not workflow solutions,” Dr. Bessler says. “They don’t tell you what do next.” So Sound Physicians created its own technology platform, dubbed Sound Connect, that interacts with in-place EMRs at hospitals across the country. The in-house system takes the functional documentation of EMRs and overlays productivity protocols, Dr. Bessler says. “It allows us to run a standard workflow and drive reproducible results and put meaningful data in the hands of the docs on a daily basis in the way that an EMR is just not set up to do,” he adds. Technology will continue “to be instrumental, of course, but I think the key thing is interoperability, which plenty has been written on, so we’re not unique in that. The more the public demands and the clinicians demand … the better patient care will be. I think the concept of EMR companies not being easy to work with has to end.”

      Biggest challenge will be integration of different technological solutions and sources of data - workflows for delivering care and for research purposes (e.g., person-level QI initiatives, passive baseline data)

    1. Poor health literacy is a silent and ubiquitous health care issue, and the field of neurosurgery is particularly prone to the consequent adverse effects. Failure to address low health literacy has several detrimental health and economic consequences, and numerous policies have been initiated to address these. Better facilitating patient understanding of neurosurgical disease, treatment options, and care surrounding the operative period may have a positive impact on the health care economy and ultimately achieve improved outcomes for patients.

      Certain disciplines are particularly prone to consequent adverse effects of poor health literacy.

    1. Beyond the Frame: The New Classroom

      In this video a discussion of how the school system is broken but cost billions of dollars. 9 billion dollars a year is spent of textbooks that become outdated the minute they are printed according to the author.

      With the new generation of learners, virtual reality will be embracing how most learners learn the best by visual means and not by reading.

      This video short impactfully presents how VR will change the face of education.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  • Oct 2018
    1. forensically informed, interdiscipli-nary approach that integrates neuropsychiat-ric, neuropsychological, and psychophysiologi-cal methods for the study of brain localisation,social cognition, and emotional processing

      can such a large study be done?

    2. neuropsychiatric evaluation of violentpatients should include clinical assessment forfrontal lobe impairment and neuropsychologi-cal evaluation of executive functions,
    3. Accurate measurement of theincreased risk of violence in subjects with pre-frontal dysfunction also requires comparisonwith rates of aggression in appropriate controls

      different brain impairments = different levels of anger?

    4. future studies testing the relation betweenfrontal lobe dysfunction and aggression shouldincorporate controls for known risk factorscontributing to violent behaviour

      good solution, but there's sOOO many factors to consider

    1. As the power is unleashed, computers on the Semantic Web achieve at first the ability to describe, then to infer, and then to reason. The schema is a huge step, and one that will enable a vast amount of interoperability and extra functionality. However, it still only categorizes data. It says nothing about meaning or understanding.

      The author presents an interesting progression for the Web to eventually learn to reason. The picture he paints of more accessible content on the internet hinges on the internet learning to reason, which is a human characteristic. It seems we need to apply human characteristics to all of our mechanics for them to progress in their usefulness.

    1. having children is a privilege that has been historically denied to many nonwhite and nonafflu-ent people.

      The idea of "no future"/ "declining to reproduce the Child" doesn't do anything to help indigenous people because having children is an act that has been regulated for indigenous people. Settler colonialism/white supremacy does not want indigenous people to create future generations so having a child could be seen as a radical act for indigenous people.

  • Sep 2018
    1. Snap is also confident that it can reach a high amount of new voters: 80 percent of its users are over 18, so this campaign won't just fall on well-meaning (but still too young) thumbs.

      Each vote counts and our votes determine our future. If we all vote for what we want we can have a better future and not complain about why our community is bad.

    1. keenest attachments, and whose natural gifts may be, if we do not squander or destroy them, exactly what we need to flourish and perfect ourselves—as human beings.

      Kass' implications in the quote indicates the potential biotechnology has on the human psyche. Although biotechnology has the ability to forge new paths in curing feeble human (or in essence, any living thing) traits, such as sickness and suffering, it can be further exploited to enhance physical traits. However, Kass' tonality shines light that when this technology is fully developed, humans will lose sight of what they formerly relied on "keenest attachments" Therefore, it is of great significance that the limbs (keenest attachments) are used to "...perfect ourselves-as human beings." and not misused or ultimately destroyed.

  • Aug 2018
    1. Động thái một loạt ông lớn như Vingroup, Viettel, FPT, VNPT, Phenikaa… công bố các dự án thúc đẩy đầu tư cho khoa học, công nghệ trùng hợp với sự kiện 100 nhân tài trẻ nước ngoài trở về tham gia Chương trình Kết nối mạng lưới đổi mới sáng tạo Việt Nam 2018 đã thổi bùng niềm tin về một công cuộc vĩ đại đánh thức các tiềm lực mới cho phát triển kinh tế.
  • Jul 2018
    1. appointment. Time chunksopen up the possibility for future-oriented temporal manipulation and valuation; they assumethat we are able to know, in advance, the duration of tasks and experiences.

      How does the idea of time chunks and future-orientation fit with:

      Reddy's temporal horizon concept? Zimbardo's future time perspective?

    1. tries (Prado 2013). Here again, instead of looking at the present as a heterogeneous context, the present isconsidered as uniform and following a linear trajectory toward

      This is an important caveat for the study of sociotemporality in humanitarian crises. Need to stay grounded in the present and how even some immediate, incremental steps toward improving the representation of time in the data and in the data gathering process can be serve the larger, future goals of attaining real-time situational awareness.

  • Jun 2018
    1. Text is not going away, but if we really want it to be understood and remembered, we should integrate it better with physical and emotional experience. This convergence may happen with the “physicalization” of the digital world, where digital experiences become part of our physical life.

      Como nos filmes, será que um dia a Web vai extrapolar o digital e ir para o mundo físico?

    1. The possibilities of this storytelling technique are demonstrated by its transference into real-life projects, such as the immersive model that his production company, 5D GlobalStudio, developed for Al Baydha, a Bedouin village in Saudi Arabia.

      In order for Alex McDowell to think of the asthetics of a possible future city, he had to use a reference project in saudi arabia. Offering options to make a rural community in a village in Saudi Arabia more efficient in different ways made it possible for him to create a (better) future Detroit.

  • May 2018
    1. Offering consultation services to clients is no longer optional in a world where websites can be generated by Squarespace and other white label services.
    2. The model of future successful brand agencies is a hybrid approach of digital and brand, neither one prioritized over the other.
    3. While none of these are a traditional logo, each of them represents a touch point between a human and a brand. Just like a logo, these types of interactions represent the tip of the iceberg of a brand. These days, a brand mark does not need to be visual–touch, interaction, or sound can equally be a brand mark.
    4. At a time when brand experiences are often based upon touch, sound, and voice, how can a branding process that starts out from a purely visual perspective ever possibly succeed?
  • Apr 2018
    1. In the short term, digital design will move beyond screens to physical surfaces and augmented or artificial environments, and designers will occupy more positions where they are directing or consulting on larger and more complex systems of experience. Design is already less visual and more collaborative, and will continue along that trend. It’s not enough, though, to look five or ten years in the future. Will there be a Machine-Learning designer in 2050? Maybe. But in forty years, it’s just as likely that jobs will no longer exist, or at least not in a way that we would recognize them.
    1. The present is sticky.  The Long Now became the Long Right Now, somehow. This is not what we had in mind when we philosophised about atemporality, but it's probably what we deserved.
  • Feb 2018
    1. This is their ‘afterlife’!” They successfully transmitted some essence of their life to a world far beyond their own.

      This is a very interesting way to think about it. Maybe we need to make sure we leave similar such traces behind.

  • Jan 2018
    1. Belong to us and to our children — Are the proper objects of our inquiries, that thereby we may know our duty, and, by complying with it, may be kept from such terrible calamities as these now mentioned.

      Proper objects of our attention and effort. Let us not waste time inquiring after things that are beyond us or that have to do with God's sovereignty and design.

  • Dec 2017
    1. The head of a small university’s "academic innovation" office explains why that phrase isn’t a contradiction in terms, and how the office helps professors amplify creative approaches to teaching and learning.
    1. What happened this year that will still matter in 2022? Digital learning experts weigh in.
    2. faculty as guides for students toward knowledge and mastery

      a real understanding of and commitment to info lit is key here.

  • Oct 2017
    1. it also turns out that neural networks and data mining in general are really good at reinforcing the prejudices of their programmers, and embedding them in hardware. Here's a racist hand dryer — it's proximity sensor simply doesn't work on dark skin! Engineers with untested assumptions about the human subjects of their machines can wreak havoc.)

      racism? in my algorithms because of the biases of the people who designed them? it's more likely than you think.

    1. People with scientific training are adopting these practices as well, either by offering services on sites such as Upwork or finding projects through their previous academic networks.
    1. I can’t go on

      but I must go on!. Is this the future we are heading towards?

    1. I take as given the evidence that human beings are irrevocably altering the conditions for life on Earth and that, despite certain unpredictabilities, we live at the cusp of a mass extinction. What is the place of digital humanities (DH) practice in the new social and geological era of the Anthropocene? What are the DH community’s most significant responsibilities, and to whom?

      While the thought of this is incredibly depressing, it does open up questions as to the place of DH. Personally, I think the DH community's most significant responsibilities are to record life on earth as we know it now, how we as humans are endangering it and suggesting ways to actively preserve it. I believe keeping a record or an archive of plants and animals that are in danger of becoming extinct (for example) is incredibly important for future generations to come and this is who DH must aim to speak to: future generations.

    1. c = np.full((2,2), 7) # Create a constant array print(c)

      To avoid the warning, use

      np.full((2,2), 7.) or use explicitly for float np.full((2,2),7, dtype=float) or for int np.full((2,2),7, dtype=int)

  • Sep 2017
    1. that to secure Ourselves where we are, we must tread with awfull reverence in the footsteps of Our fathers.

      The word "secure" demonstrates a need for status and purpose. This seems interesting in reflecting on the document as a whole, which is essentially a declaration of establishment and is securing the meaning of the university. "Tread with awful reverence" prompts a reflection upon what is considered a good and valuable life in this situation. Do we need to keep this reverence in mind with all decisions that come with the progression of the school? Tana Mardian

  • Jul 2017