15 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
  2. Aug 2019
  3. May 2019
  4. Feb 2019
    1. Teachers in the substitution and augmentation phase can use technology to accomplish traditional tasks,  but the real learning gains result from engaging students in learning experiences that could not be accomplished without technology. At the Modification and Redefinition level, the task changes and extends the walls of the classroom

      Using the whole SAMR model can help our students to use autonomy to learn information and helps us to differentiate their learning experiences.

    1. Escobar casts wide the net of his critique, his objective is not merely to tackle neoliberal capitalism, rampant individualism, patriarchy or colonialism — although each of those topics are explored in detail. He is writing against nothing less than all of modernity, a “particular modelo civilizatorio, or civilizational model… an entire way of life and a whole style of world making.” Our toxic, modern lifestyle in the Global North and the way it understands (or fails to understand) the relationality between humanity and other forms of life plays the dominant role in creating the contemporary crises. To preserve the future we need a different way of life and way to relate to all of life, “no less than a new notion of the human.” The crises are inseparable from our social lives. We need to step outside of our established worldviews to bring about significant transformations. Is this possible? How can we achieve such a transition?

      Designs for the Pluriverse book review

  5. Nov 2018
    1. For house staff in internal medicine, the introduc-tion of hospitalists may mean a greater likelihood ofbeing supervised by attending physicians who arehighly skilled and experienced in providing inpatientcare. House staff have long enjoyed a certain amountof autonomy, because many of their faculty supervi-sors have been relatively unfamiliar with moderninpatient care. Such autonomy may be diminishedwith the new approach to inpatient care. Althoughthere is bound to be transitional pain, we believethat the potential for improved inpatient teachingwill more than compensate for it. Moreover, thischange will help answer public calls for closer andmore effective faculty oversight of house staff andstudents.34
  6. Aug 2018
    1. Kant’s basicthoughts on autonomy and the public domain arehighly relevant to challenges concerning modernsociety, particularly to communication in the publicsphere. Trust is but one important topic being dis-cussed here; openness another. Thus, our aim has notonly been to demonstrate how Kant can be produc-tively applied to new technology; in addition, it hasbeen to show how the basic philosophical queriesraised within this context can be fruitfully illuminatedwithin Kant’s conceptual frames.
  7. Oct 2017
    1. Inside it is close and smelly. There are no windows. The two prisoners lie bound on the floor. The smell comes from them, a smell of old urine. I call the guard in: “Get these men to clean themselves, and please hurry.”

      This passage demonstrates the autonomy of the empire through the treatment of prisoners when Colonel Joll captures prisoners. The magistrate shows that he doesn't approve of the treatment and attempts to help the prisoners and gets"them to clean themselves" and attempts to help them, but he doesn't fully help them, he still follows the power and runs away from the problems within his society.

  8. Sep 2017
    1. The crucial consideration is that a woman's right to privacy, dignity and bodily integrity should be respected

      Woman's right to choose

    2. Also, a large number of people are non-vegetarian and they cannot be compelled to become vegetarian for a long period. What one eats is one's personal affair and it is a part of his right to privacy which is included in Article 21 of our Constitution as held by several decisions of this Court.

      Hinsa Virodhak Sangh - aside from right to practise trade under 19 (1) (g), right to make one's eating choices was also invoked - example of privacy including decisional autonomy.

      Important to note that this principles is qualified by only being applied if the ban was for a considerable period of time

  9. Jun 2016
    1. A recent organization of the experimental literature (Deci 8z Ryan, in press) revealed that events which are experienced as supporting autonomy and promoting or signifying competence-thus facilitating an internal perceived locus of causality and perceived competence-tend to increase intrinsic motivation as reflected, for example, by behavior that persists with a minimum of external support. We refer to these initiating or regulatory events as informational. Events that are experienced as pressure toward particular outcomes-thus co-opting choice and facilitating an external perceived locus of causality-tend to undermine intrinsic mo- tivation, restrict creativity (Amabile, 1983), and impair cognitive flexibility (McGraw & McCullers, 1979). We refer to these events as controlling. Finally, events which are experienced as conveying that the person cannot master an activity-thus promoting perceived incompetence-undermine intrinsic motivation and tend to leave one feeling helpless (e.g., Boggiano & Barrett, 1984). We refer to these events as amotivating.

      Wow. A pretty straightforward summary! I wonder what the "at press" article is?

      Autonomy focusses internal motivation; controlling events reduces it.

    1. The significance of autonomy versus control for the maintenance of intrin-sic motivation has been clearly observed in studies of classroom learning.For example, several studies have shown that autonomy-supportive (in con-trast to controlling) teachers catalyze in their students greater intrinsic moti-vation, curiosity, and the desire for challenge (e.g., Deci, Nezlek, & Shein-man, 1981; Ryan & Grolnick, 1986). Students who are overly controlled notonly lose initiative but also learn less well, especially when learning is com-plex or requires conceptual, creative processing (Benware & Deci, 1984;Grolnick & Ryan, 1987). Similarly, studies show children of parents whoare more autonomy supportive to be more mastery oriented—more likely tospontaneously explore and extend themselves—than children of parents whoare more controlling (Grolnick, Deci, & Ryan, 1997)

      Autonomy is crucial

  10. Sep 2014
    1. If I decide I want to be more outgoing, I could just print a personalized ad for myself with the slogan "Be more social" imposed next to a supermodel or private jet, or whatever image of success or happiness I think would motivate me the most.

      The issue with this straw person is that there's a very real repulsion people experience at perceiving themselves being manipulated. Advertising works best when we aren't thinking much about its effects.

  11. Feb 2014
    1. Autonomy, or individual freedom, is the second value that I sug- gest can be substantially served by increasing the portion of our in- formation environment that is a commons and by facilitating non- market production. Autonomy means many things to many people, and some of these conceptions are quite significantly opposed to oth- ers. Nonetheless, from an autonomy perspective the role of the indi- vidual in commons-based production is superior to property-based production almost regardless of the conception one has of that value.
  12. Oct 2013
    1. To beginners should be given matter designed, as it were, beforehand in proportion to the abilities of each. But when they shall appear to have formed themselves sufficiently on their model, a few brief directions may be given them, following which, they may advance by their own strength without any support. 6. It is proper that they should sometimes be left to themselves, lest, from the bad habit of being always led by the efforts of others, they should lose all capacity of attempting and producing anything for themselves. But when they seem to judge pretty accurately of what ought to be said, the labor of the teacher is almost at an end, though should they still commit errors, they must be again put under a guide. 7.

      Autonomy in learning and expression