167 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. The default groups, that we talked about before, like domain users and domain admins are security groups. They're used to grant or deny access to IT resources.
    2. A distribution group, is only designed to group accounts and contacts for email communication. You can't use distribution groups for assigning permission to resources.
    1. The service that hosts copies of the Active Directory database are called domain controllers, or DCs
      • Hosts a replica of the Active Directory database and group policy objects.

      • Serve as DNS servers to provide name resolution and service discovery to clients.

      • Provides central authentication through a network security protocol called Kerberos

      • Decides whether or not clients have access to shared resources like file systems and printers

    2. Active Directory has been used to centrally manage networks of computers
      • A native service for Microsoft Windows
      • Knows how to speak LDAP protocol and can interoperate with Linux, OS-X and other non-windows hosts
      • Central repository of Group Policy Objects (GPOs)
    3. One of the most common methods for this authentication is using Kerberos.
      • Kerberos is a network authentication protocol that is used to authenticate user identity, secure the transfer of user credentials, and more
    4. role-based access control, or RBAC
      • Is an approach to restricting system access to authorized users.

      • Controlling access to resources isn't all you can do. You can also centralize configuration management.

        You wouldn't want to setup printers or software for each and every user.

    1. Useful mass transportation doesn’t suddenly appear. It is carefully nurtured from a tiny seedling of a good idea to a fully-formed organism that breathes life into a city. It is a process that takes time and effort and patience as well as money.

      Could sub out mass transportation with open scholarly infrastructure! ... "Useful mass transportation doesn’t suddenly appear. It is carefully nurtured from a tiny seedling of a good idea to a fully-formed organism that breathes life into a city. It is a process that takes time and effort and patience as well as money."

  2. Sep 2020
  3. Aug 2020
  4. Jul 2020
  5. Jun 2020
  6. www.tumblr.com www.tumblr.com
    1. Opting out of ads or paying not to have ads will be the likely initial way that we'll all move towards the inevitable truism of platform business, which is that ad-only models aren't predominant for a reason.

      I personally wouldn't bother to pay. I'll just block the ads or get the content / tool someplace else. Abundant alternative options....

    1. Cities are cradles. Nests made of carefully knitted infrastructure holding us up. When a city's infrastructure is exposed - a hole in the pavement, arteries under sun - we're reminded of our dependence on a deeper physical reality and our implicit vulnerability as a result. We're reminded that our cities are engineered and technical places as much as they are natural expressions of the Human and the Social, whose buildings echo ancient grouping of people at work, play, or home. What we expect from infrastructure is that it works, because when it doesn't , it isn't. We want infrastructure to seamlessly integrate with the existing world — in the ground like water rather than an accessory above. After all, infrastructure is here to support us; an expression of what may be our most endemic myth, that the world is here for us. But with every receding seam, from cable to code, comes a techno-political risk. Without edges we cannot know where we are and nor through whom we speak.

      "our most endemic myth, that the world is here for us."

      I thought about the article about how we have a bad understanding of mapping the exact placements of utilities under manhattan.

    1. But that is changing.

      who would've thought we'd cycle back to being at war and distance

      as divisive as ever (?)

      how technology is accused of bringing the faraway closer but distancing the nearby

    1. Media is supported by ads, ads want clicks, clicks come from outrage, so therefore – the media’s goal has shifted to create as much outrage as possible

      our social and media infrastructure are outrage machines, icentivised

  7. May 2020
  8. Apr 2020
    1. Establish standard models and criteria for funding alternatives to “pay for access” or “pay to publish” (transactional funding models) so that libraries can more easily invest in diverse content and services, including open infrastructure

      Yes!

    1. pas forcément rationalisables

      la nature dynamique du phénomène numérique le rend justement non cristallisable; son actualisation permanente (donc toujours virtuel, jamais tout à fait actuel) en fait un structure «pas forcément rationalisable»

  9. Feb 2020
  10. Jan 2020
    1. Between 2011 and 2013, china used 50% more cement than the United States in the 20th century.Of the world’s 100 highest bridges, 81 are in China, including some unfinished ones.

      China's infrastructure is growing amazingly fast

  11. Dec 2019
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  • Nov 2019
    1. From Peg Cheechi, an instructional designer at Rush University: informing faculty members about the advantages of working with experts in course design.

      The Chronicle of Higher Education is a website and newspaper informing students and faculty of college affairs and news.

      Rating: 9/10

  • Oct 2019
  • Jul 2019
  • Jun 2019
    1. What are the risks in digitizing these materials outside the library? Are there possibilities of this collection not being well integrated with other holdings? Did you collaborate with metadata experts?

    1. On one hand, DH pedagogy can no longer be meaningfully said to be entirely in service of or secondary to the research project.

      !!!

      Yes! How does DH end up caught in the trap of focusing solely on research? I'm loving the notion of more attention to DH pedagogy separate from the research discussion

  • May 2019
    1. By “Infrastructure” we mean

      ​The definition of "open infrastructure" (or the software component of open infrastructure) should include an explicit requirement for open-source code.​ Even an explicit recommendation short of a requirement would be better than the current definition, which is entirely silent the value of opening the code. The Elsevier acquisition of bepress (to use one example among many) would have been much less harmful to the community if the code had been open and user institutions could hold on to the platform, fork it if they wanted, take it in their own direction, and continue using it without becoming Elsevier customers.

    1. Hey all, this is Michael – I am writing to test out this platform and to begin to build something in this document. I realize it’s slightly obscure at the moment how this pad will come to be useful during Publishing Sphere – I believe this will be come clearer in the coming days as we begin to roll out some of the sites, info, and programming for the gathering.

      Danny and I will be meeting tomorrow (Thursday, the 2nd of May) to discuss the publishing apparatus we have been discussing, and will begin to introduce it to the group as something to work off, develop in new directions, or to create publication systems concurrent to this one. Once we have this initial formulation mapped out, I’ll let him introduce it to you all to begin to discuss and edit.

      Shortly, I’ll post some info that I think is relevant to the gathering more generally, and then some additional information about you all so that you might begin to become more aware of the other members of the group. I’m truly looking forward to witnessing how you might all begin to work with one another.

      More soonest~

      M.

  • Apr 2019
    1. It's the act of creating the curriculum in a particular form that will be useful to Minnesota 3rd grade teachers that generates revenue for me, and not the content which is created.

      This is the clearest expression for me, of what David Wiley might be talking about when he calls OER infrastructure.

    1. chemistry lab simulation is the “wrong” content if students are supposed to be learning world history

      Isn't this exactly why it isn't helpful to think of content as infrastructure?

    2. Apache is a piece of software that meets the need of its developers

      Okay, so the open source software analogy has deep roots. But I still (looking at this a dozen years later) think this analogy is flawed. Apache was a webserver (infrastructure) that could serve any page (content). I think the proper analog to Apache in OER is a platform or app (Pressbooks, Hypothes.is), not any particular Pressbook or annotation.

    3. The example of the Linux kernel shows that this is completely possible.

      I think the Linux kernel analogy breaks down even more in considering "the other 93%" of educational content, which David has already identified here as more niche, less kernelesque, than content for core courses. Seems to me, the more specialized and rarely used something is — either in digital technology or in content — the less likely it is going to be the focus of widespread, shared activity.

      If commercial publishers could rely on OER content for core classes and generate revenue from wrapping them in additional services (as David describes here), what is their incentive to devote any resources to labor-intensive, niche content that would have far lower revenue margins?

    4. Traditional textbook content like words and images are just like the operating system kernel – kind of boring.

      This is the part of the argument here I don't find convincing. I'm not sure we can liken content — yes even "traditional textbook content" — to OS kernels or roads as a kind of "boring" infrastructure. Content is an expression of knowledges/understandings right? If anything, content seems more like the "interesting" part that relies on the kernels/roads.

      Yet I am interested in the idea of thinking of content as PUBLIC infrastructure, in the sense that like roads, we have common interests in securing public sources for the resources necessary to produce and maintain educational content.

    1. A Vision for Scholarly Communication Currently, there is a strong push to address the apparent deficits of the scholarly communication system. Open Science has the potential to change the production and dissemination of scholarly knowledge for the better, but there is no commonly shared vision that describes the system that we want to create.

      A Vision for Scholarly Communication

    1. Instead of encouraging more “data-sharing”, the focus should be the cultivation of “data infrastructure”,¹⁴ maintained for the public good by institutions with clear responsibilities and lines of accountability.

    1. Seized with the desire to improve the visibility of Canadian music in the world, a ragtag band of librarians led by Stacy Allison-Cassin set out to host Wikipedia edit-a-thons in the style of Art+Feminism, but with a focus on addressing Canadian music instead. Along the way, they recognized that Wikidata offered a low-barrier, high-result method of making that data not only visible but reusable as linked open data, and consequently incorporated Wikidata into their edit-a-thons. This is their story.

    1. When we think about caring for our neighbors, we think about local churches, and charities—systems embedded in our communities. But I see these technological systems as one of the main ways that we take care of each other at scale. It’s how Americans care for all three hundred million of our neighbors, rich or poor, spread over four million square miles, embedded in global supply chains.
  • Mar 2019
    1. Engaging the Public Through Wikipedia: Strategies and Tools Show affiliations

      Engaging the Public Through Wikipedia: Strategies and Tools

    1. There is a serious crisis of discoverability. To overcome it, we have to tear down the walls of dark knowledge and invest in the open discovery infrastructure, esp. user interfaces.

    1. Super cool. The difference between annotating the web, and annotating academic scholarship / science.

  • Jan 2019
    1. Our research reveals several design opportunities in this space. Importantly, informed by the empirical findings presented here, we argue for situating solutions within current work practices and infrastructures.

      Description of design opportunities

    1. As fluctuations in resource endowments arise overtime because of the fluidity in the OC, these fluctua-tions in resources create fluctuations in tensions, makingsimple structural tactics for managing tensions such ascross-functional teams or divergent opinions (Sheremata2000) inadequate for fostering knowledge collaboration.As complex as these tension fluctuations are for the com-munity, it is precisely these tensions that provide thecatalyst for knowledge collaboration. Communities thatthen respond to these tensions generatively (rather thanin restrictive ways) will be able to realize this potential.Thus, it is not the simple presence of resources that fos-ter knowledge collaboration, but rather the presence ofongoing dynamic tensions within the OC that spur thecollaboration. We describe these tensions in the follow-ing section

      Tension as a catalyst for knowledge work/collaboration

    2. Fluidity recognizes the highly flexible or permeableboundaries of OCs, where it is hard to figure out whois in the community and who is outside (Preece et al.2004) at any point in time, let alone over time. Theyare adaptive in that they change as the attention, actions,and interests of the collective of participants change overtime. Many individuals in an OC are at various stagesof exit and entry that change fluidly over time.

      Evokes boundary objects and boundary infrastructures.

    1. In knowledge work, several related factors sug-gest the need to reconceptualize coordination.

      Complex knowledge work coordination demands attention to how coordination is managed, as well as what (content) and when (temporality).

      "This distinction becomes increasingly important in complex knowledge work where there is less reliance on formal structure, interdependence is changing, and work is primarily performed in teams."

      Traditional theories of coordination are not entirely relevant to fast-response teams who are more flexible, less formally configured and use more improvised decision making mechanisms.

      These more flexible groups also are more multi-disciplinary communities of practice with different epistemic standards, work practices, and contexts.

      "Thus, because of differences in perspectives and interests, it becomes necessary to provide support for cross-boundary knowledge transformation (Carlile 2002)."

      Evokes boundary objects/boundary infrastructure issues.

    1. Under the stress of the situation, with too many peopledoing too many things at once, the socio-technical infrastructure that underliestheirwork practice wasbreaking down. Star and Ruhleder [25] explain that infrastructure becomes visible only at these points of breakdown. Volunteers directedtheir attention to their social configuration as the critical infrastructure here (the technical infrastructure remains take

      Evokes Star's work on the invisibility of boundary infrastructure until a breakdown.

    1. In this section of the paper we broach two aspects of this articulation issue, onefocusing on the management of workflow, the other on the construction and manage-ment of what we term a ‘common information space’. The former concept has beenthe subject of discussion for some time, in the guise of such terms as office automa-tion and more recently, workflow automation. The latter concept has, in our view,been somewhat neglected, despite its critical importance for the accomplishmentof many distributed work activities

      A quick scan of ACM library papers that tag "articulation work" seems to indicate the "common information space" problem still has not attracted a lot of study. This could be a good entry point for my work with CSCW because time cuts across both workflow and information space.

      Nicely bundles boundary infrastructure, sense-making and distributed work

  • Dec 2018
    1. Resistance Realily is 'that which resists,' according to Latour's (1987) Pragmatist­inspired definition. The resistances thal designers and users encounter will change lhc ubiquitous networks of classifications and standards. Although convergence may appear at times to create an inescapable cycle of feedback and verification, the very multiplicity of people, things and processes involved mean lhat they are never locked in for all time.

      Questioning the infrastructural inversion via ubiquity, material and texture, history, and power shapes the visibility and invisibility of the infrastructure that society creates for itself.

    2. Infrastructure and Method: Convergence These ubiquitous, texture