77 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Feb 2019
    1. It’s about the student and his or her feelings and thoughts, though often articulated clumsily and from an as yet unthought through position.

      The advice to separate self from role is good... but let's think about this as a reaction to the student above who says they feel like the instructor doesn't allow equal opportunities to contribute in the class. Sometimes, despite all best efforts, the faculty member may be wrong, and deep listening and learning has to allow for that possibility. Don't take it personally, but model the kind of leadership which recognizes the need for personal change.

    2. perhaps particularly the student(s) who has generated the hot moment.

      This too is a challenging statement, especially in this moment of "call-out" and "cancel" culture. I'm not even entirely sure what's meant by "generated" - the person who gives offense, or the person who takes it? I think this is fundamentally about preserving the class as a learning community, with the knowledge that means action on an individual level.

    3. to manage ourselves

      Good point - it's tempting to think that hot moments are in the student domain, but that's not entirely true. Faculty have reactions too.

    4. For some instructors, hot moments are the very stuff of classroom life. They thrive on such moments, encourage them, and use them for pointed learning. Others abhor hot moments and do everything possible to prevent or stifle them. For them, conflict prevents learning.

      One presumes the same is true of students. But how does a student know which style a faculty member prefers, and vice versa?

  3. Aug 2018
    1. This school in effect applies a Hobbesian view of politics to international relations, and assumes that aggression and insecurity are universal characteristics of human societies rather than the product of specific historical circumstances.
    1. Now he had got a grip on himself, had stopped, and was taking stock of himself and the situation.

      This is an example of a Man vs Self conflict since he is trying to keep himself calm.

    2. "But no animal can reason," objected Rainsford."My dear fellow," said the general, "there is one that can.""But you can't mean--" gasped Rainsford."And why not?""I can't believe you are serious, General Zaroff. This is a grisly joke."

      This is an example of a Man vs Man conflict since the general and Rainsford are arguing back and forth of he Rainsford truly believes that he hunts men.

    3. The cry was pinched off short as the blood-warm waters of the Caribbean Sea dosed over his head.

      This is an example of conflict. It shows Man vs Nature and that it is getting intense and he is trying hard to survive. The nature surrounding him is not treating him well.

    4. He had not been entirely clearheaded when the chateau gates snapped shut behind him. His whole idea at first was to put distance between himself and General Zaroff; and, to this end, he had plunged along, spurred on by the sharp rowers of something very like panic. Now he had got a grip on himself, had stopped, and was taking stock of himself and the situation.

      This is an example of Man vs self as rainsford has to fight himself to remain calm and think logically.

    5. Thank you, I'm a hunter, not a murderer."

      This is an example of Man vs. man as Rainsford makes it clear to the general that he does not agree with his practices.

    6. The cry was pinched off short as the blood-warm waters of the Caribbean Sea dosed over his head.He struggled up to the surface and tried to cry out, but the wash from the speeding yacht slapped him in the face and the salt water in his open mouth made him gag and strangle.

      This is a Man vs. Nature conflict because Rainsford is struggling to stay above water after he has fallen into the ocean and the salt water engulfs him making it impossible to breathe.

    7. "Tonight," said the general, "we will hunt--you and I."Rainsford shook his head. "No, general," he said. "I will not hunt."The general shrugged his shoulders and delicately ate a hothouse grape. "As you wish, my friend," he said. "The choice rests entirely with you. But may I not venture to suggest that you will find my idea of sport more diverting than Ivan's?"

      This is a Man vs. Self conflict becuast Rainsford is giving the choice to either be given to Ivan to be taken care of or to go against the general in a hunting game and it is a dicision he has to make himself.

  4. Nov 2017
    1. The Special Adviser on the Responsibility to Protect leads the conceptual, political, institutional and operational development of the Responsibility to Protect. The efforts of their Office include alerting relevant actors to the risk of genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity, enhancing the capacity of the United Nations to prevent these crimes, including their incitement.

      3/ Preventing Genocide and Responsibility to Protect

    2. Prevention requires apportioning responsibility to and promoting collaboration between concerned States and the international community. The duty to prevent and halt genocide and mass atrocities lies first and foremost with the State, but the international community has a role that cannot be blocked by the invocation of sovereignty. Sovereignty no longer exclusively protects States from foreign interference; it is a charge of responsibility where States are accountable for the welfare of their people.

      3/ Preventing Genocide and Responsibility to Protect

    3. Complementing preventive diplomacy is preventive disarmament, which seeks to reduce the number of small arms in conflict-prone regions. In El Salvador, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Timor-Leste and elsewhere, this has entailed demobilizing combat forces, as well as collecting and destroying their weapons as part of an overall peace agreement. Destroying yesterday’s weapons prevents their being used in tomorrow’s wars.

      2/ Preventive disarmament

    4. In some trouble spots, the mere presence of a skilled envoy can prevent the escalation of tension. This work is often undertaken in cooperation with regional organizations.

      1/ Preventive diplomacy

    5. Early warning is an essential component of prevention, and the United Nations carefully monitors developments around the world to detect threats to international peace and security, thereby enabling the Security Council and the Secretary-General to carry out preventive action.

      1/ Preventive diplomacy

    6. The main strategies for preventing disputes from escalating into conflict, and for preventing the recurrence of conflict, are preventive diplomacy and preventive disarmament. Preventive diplomacy refers to action taken to prevent disputes from arising or from escalating into conflicts, and to limit the spread of conflicts when they occur. It may take the form of mediation, conciliation or negotiation.

      +Conflict Prevention

      • Preventive diplomacy
      • Preventive disarmament
      • Preventing Genocide and Responsibility to Protect
  5. Oct 2017
    1. ‘No, you wouldn’t have.’

      Similar to her previous line, this dialogue from the girl introduces us readers to an underling element of negativity. The line is a charged, declarative statement, suggesting that she may not hold her male companion in high esteem. Or at least, is non-receptive to his response. It's a line containing hostility and perhaps even resentment.

      This introduces us to our first experience of conflict between the girl and the American.

  6. Aug 2017
    1. Person vs. person is when General Zaroff forces Rainsford to play in his "game" against him.Person vs. surroundings is when Rainsford was trying to swim to shore and when he was trying to survive in the wilderness/jungle. Person vs. self was when the text said, "He could stay where he was... That was suicide. He could flee. That was postponing the inevitable."

  7. Jun 2017
    1. people feel comfortable to exchange ideas and challenge the status quo without fear of misplaced judgement or rejection.

      THIS! Need to have healthy space for discussions, even when it is uncomfortable discussions.

    2. Fair warning to team members (and leaders) who don’t like conflict — things will get awkward. But if teams can’t identify the issues, communicate constructively, and work to resolve them, they will get stuck at this stage.

      Expect conflict. Respectful conflict is healthy and should be encouraged.

  8. Mar 2017
    1. The teacher in front of me was also clearly in a hurry "Do you have many more copies to make? I have a class in five minutes?"

      teacher conflict teacher stress teacher panic

  9. Nov 2016
    1. Huerta rose to power, Villa teamed up with a former ally, Emiliano Zapata, and Venustiano Carranza to overthrow the new president.

      After Huerta assassinated Madero, he became presidant and Villa teamed up with a former ally Emiliano Zapata to over throw him

  10. Oct 2016
    1. hy did he have to say that, about getting it wholesale?

      she seams kinda mean she sounds like a antagonist the center of the conflict.

  11. Sep 2016
    1. The author affirms that “Zombies—lacking interior, lacking mind—cannot look; they are, for this reason, completely realized colonial objects. Zombies cannot be recognized, accommodated, or negotiated with; once identified, they must immediately be killed.” He contends that the coding of the zombie figure in the biopolitical terms of epidemic is evidence that “The biopolitical state . . . needs to create this sort of racial imaginary in order to retain its power to kill.”

      I've been a big fan of the zombie/living dead sub-genre since I was pretty young, and the interest has grown even more in the last 12+ years. Overtime, I have wondered whether this sub-genre, our fascination with zombies/infected apocalyptic themes/elements, has deeper meaning for us that can point back to the innate nature of othering or ingroup/outgroup. There are stories of genocide and wars in literature throughout time and across every culture. Humankind has an extensive history that involves the oppression and marginalization of many different civilizations and people. We have an intimate relationship with war and conflict. In the past, it may have not been so usual to see apocalyptic literature with themes that target a certain race or groups of people, even a race that was deemed inferior or less than fully human, due to the prevailing ideologies and worldviews during those times. But the same attitude and worldview is unacceptable today, at least to many. Survivors of the apocalypse can't go all feral and Purge on another group of people, at least not on such a wide scale. However, zombies/infected seem to take that place. Zombies serve a similar function. Not only is there the classic world-ending event that has existed in religious literature for millennia, but survivors get to maintain human supremacy (rather than racial) over non-humans. It becomes unacceptable because these things are no longer conscious or recognized as a living, sentiment human.

    2. Another oft-overlooked aspect of biblical apocalypse is its (doubly) utopian nature: the triumph of God’s faithful over Lucifer’s followers at Mount Megiddo is to result in Satan being confined to hell, ushering in Christ’s millennial reign on Earth—a period of peace, plenty, and harmony. The devil will then escape for four years before suffering a final defeat, at which time the dead are to be resurrected and the final judgment of souls will take place. Mass annihilation is therefore only the beginning of a process that will allow the righteous to enter into the ultimate, eternal Utopia, heaven, and the unjust to be sent to that dystopia par excellence, hell. Thus apocalypse, even in its scriptural source, is inextricably tied to the concepts of utopia and dystopia

      This interpretation of Christian eschatology, based on futurism, presents a utopia is exclusive by its very nature. There isn't just the battle of good vs. evil, of Yahweh vs. Ha-satan, but also a final judgment and the annihilation of "unsaved" souls.

      But like I stated previously, even modern concepts of utopian societies are exclusive in at least some, or many ways. There is something that we have to sacrifice or give up, or communities/groups that we have to exclude, in order to achieve the ideal. Then again, what is the ideal? In ancient literature the utopian society is metaphysical in nature, based largely on the concept of an afterlife. Within the context of an afterlife there is no human experience or condition, so the ideal, whatever that may be, can be achieved. If it's an afterlife, and one often depicted in Western literature, film, art, etc., then it is devoid of the trials and tribulations that make the human condition what it is, and make us what we are: imperfect.

      But in the real world, outside a utopian afterlife, the human condition is alive and well. Conflict and struggles persist. There is an aspect of control earth-based utopian societies, and one could even say the classic heaven-based utopian concept is not without its own set of rules governed by Yahweh, Jesus, et al.

  12. Nov 2015
    1. Research points to the notion that gratitude might have positive effects on transforming conflicts, which can benefit the organization and working relationships. How do you do that? It starts with the one charged with mediating the conflict: For example, a supervisor with two bickering employees might open a meeting by expressing sincere appreciation of both parties. Throughout the process, that person should never miss an opportunity to say “thank you.” The research says this attitude of gratitude will have a positive feedback effect, even if results aren’t obvious right away.
  13. Oct 2015
    1. This offers us insight into the true nature of embarrassment: I have discovered that this subtle display—the averted gaze, the pressed lips—is a sign of our respect for others, our appreciation of their view of things, and our commitment to the moral and social order. Far from reflecting confusion, it turns out that embarrassment can be a peacemaking force that brings people together—both during conflict and after breeches of the social contract, when there’s otherwise great potential for violence and disorder. I’ve even found evidence that facial displays of embarrassment have deep evolutionary roots, and that this seemingly inconsequential emotion provides us with a window into the ethical brain.
    2. Dacher documents his research on embarrassment, an often involuntary emotional response to having committed a social faux pas. People all around the world reflexively signal appeasement when they feel embarrassed, which serves as an unspoken acknowledgement of wrongdoing or having broken a social contract. This submissive, apologetic signal serves to avoid or prevent--rather than invite--conflict.  
  14. Sep 2015
    1. Working with captive primates, de Waal and Johanowicz created a mixed-sex social group of juvenile macaques, combining rhesus and stump tails together. Remarkably, instead of the rhesus macaques bullying the stump tails, over the course of a few months the rhesus males adopted the stump tails’ social style, eventually even matching the stump tails’ high rates of reconciliatory behavior. It so happens, moreover, that stump tails and rhesus macaques use different gestures when reconciling. The rhesus macaques in the study did not start using the stump tails’ reconciliatory gestures, but rather increased the incidence of their own species-typical gestures. In other words, they were not merely imitating the stump tails’ behavior; they were incorporating the concept of frequent reconciliation into their own social practices. Finally, when the newly warm-and-fuzzy rhesus macaques were returned to a larger, all-rhesus group, their new behavioral style persisted.

      An amazing way of looking at this is persistence of social qualities, regardless of the biological vector involved. On the other hand, such social qualities do not appear to be viral by any means: "This is nothing short of extraordinary. But it brings up one further question: When those rhesus macaques were transferred back into the all-rhesus world, did they spread their insights and behaviors to the others? Alas, they did not—at least not within the relatively short time they were studied. For that, we need to move on to a final case."

    2. Kummer conducted a simple experiment, trapping an adult female savanna baboon and releasing her into a hamadryas troop and trapping an adult female hamadryas and releasing her into a savanna troop. The females who were dropped in among a different species initially carried out their species-typical behavior, a major faux pas in the new neighborhood. But gradually, they absorbed the new rules. How long did this learning take? About an hour. In other words, millennia of genetic differences separating the two species, a lifetime of experience with a crucial social rule for each female—and a miniscule amount of time to reverse course completely.
    1. Keyan Tomaselli does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond the academic appointment above.

      As people have pointed out in the comments, author is Editor in Chief of Critical Arts. Relevant for potential conflict of interest given this paragraph:

      Taylor & Francis in particular, via a development strategy with selected South African journals, initially facilitated by the National Research Foundation and Unisa Press, helped to position many of these titles as global, rather than only local. In so doing, they catapulted South African authors into global research networks.

  15. Mar 2014
    1. While the city was burning, the Lydians and all the Persians who were in the citadel, being hemmed in on every side since the fire was consuming the outer parts and having no exit from the city,

      Hdt. 5.101 The Ionians burn Sardis to the ground 498 BCE The Achaemenid Empire is not indestructible. Even the Ionians (notorious servant folk) can be convinced to revolt.

    2. When his words were brought back to the Athenians, they would not consent to them, and since they would not consent, it was resolved that they should be openly at war with Persia.

      Hdt. 5.96 Athenians refuse to take Hippias back, thus making their dispute with the Achaemenid Empire public (so it shall be war between us). The Achaemenid are no longer the only open aggressors on the board, free to build their empire at will. Now the threatened territories challenging their authority. This sets up the conflict between the states and also echoes Herodotus' idea of cyclical nations. Nations move from barbarism to simple, masculine, civilization to effeminate opulence. Once a nation reaches a level of effeminate opulence it will surely fall to a more rugged simple-living people.

    3. The Naxians, then, made all preparations to face the onset of war. When their enemies had brought their ships over from Chios to Naxos, it was a fortified city that they attacked, and for four months they besieged it.

      Hdt. 5.34 After approving his plan with Darius and Artaphrenes, Aristagoras sets out to attack Naxos. The Naxians surprisingly outlast the attacking Achaemenid forces, enduring a four month siege. The prolonged siege leaves Aristagoras bankrupt...

    4. This Otanes, then, who sat upon that seat, was now made successor to Megabazus in his governorship. He captured Byzantium, Calchedon, Antandrus in the Troad, and Lamponium, and with ships he had taken from the Lesbians, he took Lemnos and Imbros, both of which were still inhabited by Pelasgians.

      Hdt. 5.25 Otanes follows Megabazos in the line of Darius' generals. He goes on a shopping spree of the Aegean islands capturing Byzantium, Calchedon, Antandrus, Lamponium, Lemnos, and Imbros. This extends Achaemenid control out of Asia and the Hellespont into the Aegean Sea, directly threatening mainland Greece.

    5. Those Persians whom Darius had left in Europe under the command of Megabazus, finding the Perinthians unwilling to be Darius' subjects, subdued them before any others of the people of the Hellespont.

      Hdt. 5.1 Megabazus, as a proxy of Darius and the Achaemenid Empire, subdues the Perinthians living near the Hellespont.

  16. Feb 2014
    1. As time went on, Croesus subjugated almost all the nations west of the Halys

      1.28. The Landmark Herodotus dates this to 560-547 BC.

    2. These were the first whom Croesus attacked; afterwards he made war on the Ionian and Aeolian cities in turn, upon different pretexts

      1.26. Croesus attacks the Ionian and Aeolian cities on various pretexts, probably ca. 560-550 BC.

    3. for eleven years

      1.18. The chronology is confused, but the Landmark Herodotus suggests 610-598 BC (p. 12).

    4. the Cimmerians, driven from their homes by the nomad Scythians, came into Asia, and took Sardis

      1.15. According to the Landmark Herodotus, which cites Assyrian documentary sources, the capture of Sardis by the Cimmerians took place in 644, at which time Gyges was killed.

    5. He took Priene and invaded the country of Miletus

      1.15. Ardys, Gyges' son, also makes war on the Milesians.

    6. As soon as Gyges came to the throne, he too, like others, led an army into the lands of Miletus and Smyrna; and he took the city of Colophon

      1.15. Gyges engages in conflict with the Ionian cities on the coast of Asia Minor nearest to Lydia. The Lydian kings appear to have a particular antipathy to the Milesians.

    7. Alyattes, who waged war against Deioces' descendant Cyaxares and the Medes

      1.16. Alyattes, king of Lydia, wages ware against the Medes under Cyaxares, probably in the late 7th or early 6th c. BC.

    8. . Tomyris, when Cyrus would not listen to her, collected all her forces and engaged him. This fight I judge to have been the fiercest ever fought by men that were not Greek;

      1.214 The persian Army is destroyed and Cyrus is killed in a great battle with the Massagetai.

    9. Then the Persians attacked them, killing many and taking many more alive, among whom was the son of Tomyris the queen, Spargapises by name, the leader of the Massagetae.

      1.211 Croesus' stratagem succeeds. the Persians destroy one third of the Massagetai force and capture Tomyris' son, Spargapises.

    10. When Cyrus had conquered this nation, too, he wanted to subject the Massagetae.

      1.201 After concurring the Babylonians Cyrus turns his attention to the Massegetai, determined to add them to his growing Achaemenid Empire.

    11. But as it was, the Persians took them unawares, and because of the great size of the city (those who dwell there say) those in the outer parts of it were overcome, but the inhabitants of the middle part knew nothing of it;

      1.191 Cyrus and the Persian army attack Babylon by lowering the level of the Euphrates and takes the city by surprise.

    12. Cyrus, then, marched against Nitocris' son, who inherited the name of his father Labynetus and the sovereignty of Assyria.

      1.188 Cyrus attacks Nitokris' son Labynetos of Babylon as part of his conquest of Assyria.

    13. When Cyrus had made all the mainland submit to him, he attacked the Assyrians.

      1.178 Cyrus decides to attack Babylon and all of Assyria. This passage marks the end of Harpagos's conquering of Asia Minor (all of which has now come under the power of the Achaemenids).

    14. These were the only men near Caria who held out for long against Harpagus,

      1.175 The Pedaseans are the only one among the Carians to hold out against Harpagos for an extended period of time. Herodotus demarcates them from the rest of the subjugated peoples of Asia Minor.

    15. nor any Greeks who dwell in this country did any thing notable before they were all enslaved by Harpagus. Among those who inhabit it are certain Cnidians, colonists from Lacedaemon.

      1.174 In Harpagos's conquest of Ionia and Aeolia for the Achaemenid Empire, he engaged the Lacedaemonian settlers in Triopion and conquered them without too much trouble.

    16. Lycians

      1.171 Harpagos goes on a veritable shopping spree of acquisitions for the Achaemenid Empire, including the Lycian in the region of Lycia in Asia Minor.

    17. Carians

      1.171 Harpagos goes on a veritable shopping spree of acquisitions for the Achaemenid Empire, including the Carians in the region of Caria in Asia Minor.

    18. Caunians

      1.171 Harpagos goes on a veritable shopping spree of acquisitions for the Achaemenid Empire, including the Caunuans in the city of Caunus .

    19. The rest of the Ionians, except the Milesians, though they faced Harpagus in battle as did the exiles, and conducted themselves well, each fighting for his own country, yet, when they were defeated and their cities taken,

      1.169 The Ionian islands and the rest of Ionian are conquered by Harpagos and Cyrus for the growing Achaemenid Empire.

    20. The Teians did the same things as the Phocaeans: when Harpagus had taken their walled city by building an earthwork, they all embarked aboard ship and sailed away for Thrace.

      1.168 The Teians of the island Teos pull the same disappearing act the Phocaeans pulled in 1.164, escaping the siege of Harpagos and the Persian Army by abandoning the city to the Achaemenid general.

    21. So when Harpagus withdrew his army from the walls, the Phocaeans launched their fifty-oared ships

      1.164 The Phocaeans escape from Harpagos and the Persian Army as the siege lines retreat.

    22. Phocaea was the first Ionian town that he attacked.

      1.163 Harpagos, a general and representative of the Achaemenids, begins his conquest of Ionia in the name of Cyrus. His conquest starts at Phocaea and captures the city with a siege.

    23. at length the Lydians were routed and driven within their city wall, where they were besieged by the Persians.

      1.80 After the battle, the defeated Medes retreat and the Persian Army lays siege to the city of Sardis.

    24. when Cyrus arrived and encamped face to face with Croesus, there in the Pterian country the armies had a trial of strength. The fighting was fierce, many on both sides fell, and at nightfall they disengaged with neither side victorious.

      1.76 The forces of Cyrus and Croesus engage in battle near Pteria , Cappadocia. Neither side is victorious but there were huge losses on each side.

    25. Leading these out, and engaging the Persians, he was beaten:

      1.128 Another battle ensues and Astyages is defeated once again by Cyrus. This time he is taken prisoner by Cyrus and loses his army.

    26. So when the Medes marched out and engaged with the Persians,

      1.127 A battle between the forces of Astyages and Cyrus occurs

    27. Such is the Persian account; in their opinion, it was the taking of Troy which began their hatred of the Greeks

      Hdt. 1.5 The Persians say Troy began their hatred of the Greeks.

    28. after this (the Persians say), the Greeks were very much to blame; for they invaded Asia before the Persians attacked Europe.

      Hdt. 1.4 The Persians say the Greeks were to blame; the Greeks invaded Asia before the Persians attacked Europe.

    29. Persian learned men say that the Phoenicians were the cause of the dispute

      Hdt. 1.1 The Persians blame the Phoenicians for their dispute.

    30. he sent messengers to Cyme demanding that Pactyes be surrendered.

      Mazares sends a message to the Cymeans to negotiate the return of Pactyes the rabble-rouser.

    31. But Pactyes, learning that an army sent against him was approaching, was frightened and fled to Cyme.

      1.157 Pactyes escapes to Cyme in order to avoid the wrath of Cyrus and the approaching Persian army. This vignette of conflict within the Achaemenids/Persians is still a long way from its conclusion.

    32. Pactyes made the Lydians revolt from Tabalus and Cyrus

      1.154 Division within the Persians. Pactyes revolts against Cyrus, taking over the treasury of Sardis and leading a rebellion.

    33. So then they were besieged.

      The Persian army lays siege to Sardis, the capitol and last foothold of Croesus and the Medes. In the culmination of this siege, Croesus's forces will be overcome and the monarch himself will be captured by his enemies, fulfilling the prophecy from 1.13 and reiterated in 1.53.

    34. So when battle was joined, as soon as the horses smelled and saw the camels they turned to flight, and all Croesus' hope was lost.

      1.80.5 Cyrus scores a definitive victory over the forces of Croesus, employing camel cavalry corps. This is the beginning of the end for Croesus who begins grasping at strings and looking for allies to help him defeat the Persians.

  17. Oct 2013
    1. The following website suggests that the picture at the top of this article doesn't represent what is implied. Indeed, the title suggests that the graph represents radioactive waters spreading through the ocean, but the following website says "the map was created by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to chart wave patterns from the March 2011 Tohoku earthquake". Check it out: http://www.ultraculture.org/fukushima-scare-picture-fake/

  18. Sep 2013
    1. Why, their modesty is so great that they are driven to contradict themselves, first one and then the other of them, in the face of a large company, on matters of the highest moment

      This goes back to the idea of caring about what the world thinks of you causing self conflict in inopportune moments.