6 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The ideas expressed in Creative Experience continueto have an impact. Follett’s process of integration, for example, forms the basisof what is now commonly referred to as a ‘‘win-win’’ approach to conflictresolution; and her distinction between ‘‘power-with’’ and ‘‘power-over’’ hasbeen used by so many distinguished thinkers that it has become a part of ourpopular vocabulary. ≤

      While she may not have coined the phrase "win-win", Mary Parker Follett's process of integration described in her book Creative Experience (Longmans, Green & Co., 1924) forms the basis of what we now refer to as the idea of "win-win" conflict resolution.

      Follett's ideas about power over and power with also stem from Creative Experience as well.

      1. Those using the power-over, power-with distinction include Dorothy Emmett, the first woman president of the British Aristotelian Society, and Hannah Arendt; Mans- bridge, ‘‘Mary Parker Follet: Feminist and Negotiator,’’ xviii–xxii.

      Syndication link: - https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Win%E2%80%93win_game&type=revision&diff=1102353117&oldid=1076197356

  2. Sep 2020
    1. It turns out that even the length of time an element has been mounted is an important piece of state that determines what pixels the user sees. And some of this state can’t simply be lifted into our application state.

      What this means is that our desire to express UI using pure functions is in direct conflict with the very nature of the DOM. It’s a great way to describe a state => pixels transformation — perfect for game rendering or generative art — but when we’re building apps on the web, the idea chafes against the reality of a stateful medium.

  3. Feb 2019
    1. It’s about the student and his or her feelings and thoughts, though often articulated clumsily and from an as yet unthought through position.

      The advice to separate self from role is good... but let's think about this as a reaction to the student above who says they feel like the instructor doesn't allow equal opportunities to contribute in the class. Sometimes, despite all best efforts, the faculty member may be wrong, and deep listening and learning has to allow for that possibility. Don't take it personally, but model the kind of leadership which recognizes the need for personal change.

    2. perhaps particularly the student(s) who has generated the hot moment.

      This too is a challenging statement, especially in this moment of "call-out" and "cancel" culture. I'm not even entirely sure what's meant by "generated" - the person who gives offense, or the person who takes it? I think this is fundamentally about preserving the class as a learning community, with the knowledge that means action on an individual level.

    3. to manage ourselves

      Good point - it's tempting to think that hot moments are in the student domain, but that's not entirely true. Faculty have reactions too.

    4. For some instructors, hot moments are the very stuff of classroom life. They thrive on such moments, encourage them, and use them for pointed learning. Others abhor hot moments and do everything possible to prevent or stifle them. For them, conflict prevents learning.

      One presumes the same is true of students. But how does a student know which style a faculty member prefers, and vice versa?