409 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
  2. Jun 2022
    1. Third, sharing our ideas with others introduces a major element ofserendipity

      There is lots of serendipity here, particularly when people are willing to either share their knowledge or feel compelled to share it as part of an imagined life "competition" or even low forms of mansplaining, though this last tends to be called this when the ultimate idea isn't serendipitous but potentially so commonly known that there is no insight in the information.

      This sort of "public serendipity" or "group serendipity" is nice because it means that much of the work of discovery and connecting ideas is done by others against your own work rather that you sorting/searching through your own more limited realm of work to potentially create it.

      Group focused combinatorial creativity can be dramatically more powerful than that done on one's own. This can be part of the major value behind public digital gardens, zettelkasten, etc.

  3. May 2022
    1. Here's a link to the penultimate draft (not for citation): https://www.academia.edu/46814693/The_Signaling_Function_of_Sharing_Fake_Stories

      This broad thesis sounds to me like something I've read before, perhaps in George Lakoff about people signaling group membership or perhaps people with respect to their voting tendencies. The question isn't who should I vote for specifically, but who would someone like me (ie. who would my group, my tribe) vote for?

      This sort of phenomena is likely easier to see/show in sports fans who will tell blatant untruths or delude themselves about the teams of which they are fans.The team winning at all costs will cause them to put on blinders.

      A particular recent example of something like this with relation to what might otherwise be a logical business decision is seen in incoming Amazon CEO Andy Jassy nixing the idea of building in Philadelphia due to his own NFL fandom https://www.phillyvoice.com/amazon-hq2-philly-eagles-giants-rivalry-andy-jassy-jeff-bezos-amazon-unbound/

      Why would someone make a potential multi-million dollar decision over their sports preference?

  4. Apr 2022
    1. Assigning group grades without attempting to distinguish between individual members of the group is both unfair and deleterious to learning and may in some circumstances even be illegal (Kagan, 1997; Millis & Cottell, 1998).

    1. Researchdemonstrates that students who engage in active learning acquire a deeperunderstanding of the material, score higher on exams, and are less likely to failor drop out.

      Active learning is a pedagogical structure whereby a teacher presents a problem to a group of students and has them (usually in smaller groups) collectively work on the solutions together. By talking and arguing amongst themselves they actively learn together not only how to approach problems, but to come up with their own solutions. Teachers can then show the correct answer, discuss why it was right and explain how the alternate approaches may have gone wrong. Research indicates that this approach helps provide a deeper understanding of the materials presented this way, that students score higher on exams and are less likely to either fail or drop out of these courses.

      Active learning sounds very similar to the sorts of approaches found in flipped classrooms. Is the overlap between the two approaches the same, or are there parts of the Venn diagrams of the two that differ, and, if so, how do they differ? Which portions are more beneficial?

      Does this sort of active learning approach also help to guard against "group think" as the result of comparing solutions from various groups? How might this be applied to democracy? Would separate versions of committees that then convene to compare notes and come up with solutions improve the quality of solutions?

    2. Humans’ tendency to“overimitate”—to reproduce even the gratuitous elements of another’s behavior—may operate on a copy now, understand later basis. After all, there might begood reasons for such steps that the novice does not yet grasp, especially sinceso many human tools and practices are “cognitively opaque”: not self-explanatory on their face. Even if there doesn’t turn out to be a functionalrationale for the actions taken, imitating the customs of one’s culture is a smartmove for a highly social species like our own.

      Is this responsible for some of the "group think" seen in the Republican party and the political right? Imitation of bad or counter-intuitive actions outweights scientifically proven better actions? Examples: anti-vaxxers and coronavirus no-masker behaviors? (Some of this may also be about or even entangled with George Lakoff's (?) tribal identity theories relating to "people like me".

      Explore this area more deeply.

      Another contributing factor for this effect may be the small-town effect as most Republican party members are in the countryside (as opposed to the larger cities which tend to be more Democratic). City dwellers are more likely to be more insular in their interpersonal relations whereas country dwellers may have more social ties to other people and groups and therefor make them more tribal in their social interrelationships. Can I find data to back up this claim?

      How does link to the thesis put forward by Joseph Henrich in The WEIRDest People in the World: How the West Became Psychologically Peculiar and Particularly Prosperous? Does Henrich have data about city dwellers to back up my claim above?

      What does this tension have to do with the increasing (and potentially evolutionary) propensity of humans to live in ever-increasingly larger and more dense cities versus maintaining their smaller historic numbers prior to the pre-agricultural timeperiod?

      What are the biological effects on human evolution as a result of these cultural pressures? Certainly our cultural evolution is effecting our biological evolution?

      What about the effects of communication media on our cultural and biological evolution? Memes, orality versus literacy, film, radio, television, etc.? Can we tease out these effects within the socio-politico-cultural sphere on the greater span of humanity? Can we find breaks, signs, or symptoms at the border of mass agriculture?


      total aside, though related to evolution: link hypercycles to evolution spirals?

    1. John Bye [@_johnbye]. (2021, October 6). The new covid sceptic All Party Parliamentary Group on Pandemic Response and Recovery is backed by Gupta and Heneghan’s Collateral Global to the tune of over £30,000. £5,000 in financial benefits plus £25,501—£27,000 benefits in kind (CG is acting as their secretariat). Https://t.co/qll20Sg9aA [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/_johnbye/status/1445867760819396608

    1. Dr Duncan Robertson [@Dr_D_Robertson]. (2021, October 29). ONS Covid survey. 2% of the population +ve. “The percentage of people testing positive for COVID-19 increased for all age groups, except for those in school Year 12 to those aged 34 years, where the trend was uncertain in the week ending 22 October 2021” https://ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/bulletins/coronaviruscovid19infectionsurveypilot/29october2021 https://t.co/1n9KVq6wDT [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/Dr_D_Robertson/status/1454050450106376192

    1. You need to be in the triplescripts.org group to see this annotation.

      Membership is semi-private, but only as a consequence of current limitations of the Hypothes.is service.

      A copy of this annotation has been published in the Hypothes.is Public stream, which explains in detail that anyone is permitted to join.

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  5. Mar 2022
    1. sh-h-d

      I really was surprised that the writer will actually mention the roots of an Arabic word. I don't understand why the writer mentioned the roots while talking about war

    1. Welcome To 3D Pools and Landscape, the Best Pool Builder in the Katy´s and Houston Area

      I wasnt able to find anything in this article that can relate to my group project with the topic bail reform since this article is about a pool design and landscaping service.

  6. Feb 2022
    1. Anthony Costello. (2022, February 24). The risks of cognitive symptoms lasting at least 12 MONTHS were much higher in the infected group. 4.8x higher for fatigue, 3.2x for brain fog, 5.3x for poor memory, and an incredible 51x for altered taste and smell. We need data on children, but it could easily be similar. (17) https://t.co/JC1qYyW2Xc [Tweet]. @globalhlthtwit. https://twitter.com/globalhlthtwit/status/1496957266016313348

    1. a place that transvestites are drawn to ... probably for narcotics use

      This connects with my group project because it relates to the nypd. If the bail reform laws were in place during this time all of the people arrested in this would be out on bail.

    1. When an appraiser lowballs the value of a home simply because a Black family owns it, you are effectively committing grand larceny. You are robbing people of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of dollars. And it happens all the time.

      If the size and quality and everything else about a home is the same as another home, but the only difference is that its in a black neighborhood feels way too close to redlining, which the fair housing act makes illegal

  7. Jan 2022
    1. Whether it's due to institutional negligence or defiance, it seems that for now, the image is here to stay.

      This image shows how permanent things on the internet now can be.

  8. Dec 2021
    1. Office of the Memoriali

      This was a tricky one to find due to when the Memoriali was set up and likely issues from translation and the possibility that the office has changed its name or has been absorbed into something else.

      At the time, Bologna had the Libri Memoriali set up where notaries had to register articles with a value of 20 Lire or more to it. The term itself likely means "memorial books" if google translate is correct.

      With this, it is likely to assume that the Office of the Memoriali was likely a place to register wills, death certificates, etc. for official legal records.

      https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1384&context=rmmra

  9. Nov 2021
  10. Oct 2021
    1. While I think that there is something to embrace and retain in the idea of a bio-logic of the conditions of possibility of a normatively oriented form of life and even in the concept of a transcendental we, I have argued in a number of places that the only empirically, theoretically and phenomenologically adequate way for achieving something along these lines is by focusing, not on the idea of the individual, but rather on the emergence by 'natural detachment' of the normatively integrated hominin group.[6]

      Moss states the point at which he disagrees with Plessner.

    1. Team syntegrity and democratic group decision making: theory and practice

      Team Syntegrity

      Stafford Beer created Team Syntegrity as a methodology for social interaction that predisposes participants towards shared agreement among varied and sometimes conflicting interests, without compromising the legitimate claims and integrity of those interests. This paper outlines the methodology and the underlying philosophy, describing several applications in a variety of countries and contexts, indicating why such an approach causes us to re-think more traditional approaches to group decision processes, and relating Team Syntegrity to other systems approaches.

      Shared by Kirby Urner in the Trimtab Book Club

  11. Sep 2021
    1. For the Stop Reset Go project, we are exploring how we achieve a group flow state that can connect us in an experience of deep humanity as we engage in a process of human inner transformation and social outer transformation. The goal of the project is bottom-up whole system change.

      The concept of a builders collective is to document what people are already doing to build a world that works for 100% of life.

    1. This is the theory of the extended mind, introduced more than two decades ago by the philosophers Andy Clark and David Chalmers. A 1998 article of theirs published in the journal Analysis began by posing a question that would seem to have an obvious answer: “Where does the mind stop and the rest of the world begin?” They went on to offer an unconventional response. The mind does not stop at the usual “boundaries of skin and skull,” they maintained. Rather, the mind extends into the world and augments the capacities of the biological brain with outside-the-brain resources.

      https://icds.uoregon.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Clark-and-Chalmers-The-Extended-Mind.pdf

      Where does the mind stop and the rest of the world begin?

      There seems to be a parallel between this question and that between the gene and the body. Evolution is working at the level of the gene, but the body and the environment are part of the extended system as well. Link these to Richard Dawkins idea of the extended gene and ideas of group selection.

      Are there effects to be seen on the evolutionary scale of group selection ideas with respect to the same sorts of group dynamics like the minimal group paradigm? Can the sorts of unconscious bias that occur in groups be the result of individual genes? This seems a bit crazy, but potentially worth exploring if there are interlinked effects based on this analogy.

    2. The minds of other people can also supplement our limited individual memory. Daniel Wegner, a psychologist at Harvard, named this collective remembering “transactive memory.” As he explained it, “Nobody remembers everything. Instead, each of us in a couple or group remembers some things personally — and then can remember much more by knowing who else might know what we don’t.” A transactive memory system can effectively multiply the amount of information to which an individual has access. Organizational research has found that groups that build a strong transactive memory structure — in which all members of the team have a clear and accurate sense of what their teammates know — perform better than groups for which that structure is less defined.

      Transactive memory is how a group encodes, stores, and shares knowledge. Members of a group may be aware of the portions of knowledge that others possess which can make them more efficient.

      How can we link this to Cesar Hidalgo's ideas about the personbyte, etc.?

      How would this idea have potentially helped oral cultures?

      She uses the example of a trauma resuscitation team helping to shorten hospital stays, but certainly there are many examples in the corporate world where corporate knowledge is helpful in decreasing time scales for particular outcomes.

    3. One last resource for augmenting our minds can be found in other people’s minds. We are fundamentally social creatures, oriented toward thinking with others. Problems arise when we do our thinking alone — for example, the well-documented phenomenon of confirmation bias, which leads us to preferentially attend to information that supports the beliefs we already hold. According to the argumentative theory of reasoning, advanced by the cognitive scientists Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber, this bias is accentuated when we reason in solitude. Humans’ evolved faculty for reasoning is not aimed at arriving at objective truth, Mercier and Sperber point out; it is aimed at defending our arguments and scrutinizing others’. It makes sense, they write, “for a cognitive mechanism aimed at justifying oneself and convincing others to be biased and lazy. The failures of the solitary reasoner follow from the use of reason in an ‘abnormal’ context’” — that is, a nonsocial one. Vigorous debates, engaged with an open mind, are the solution. “When people who disagree but have a common interest in finding the truth or the solution to a problem exchange arguments with each other, the best idea tends to win,” they write, citing evidence from studies of students, forecasters and jury members.

      Thinking in solitary can increase one's susceptibility to confirmation bias. Thinking in groups can mitigate this.

      How might keeping one's notes in public potentially help fight against these cognitive biases?

      Is having a "conversation in the margins" with an author using annotation tools like Hypothes.is a way to help mitigate this sort of cognitive bias?

      At the far end of the spectrum how do we prevent this social thinking from becoming groupthink, or the practice of thinking or making decisions as a group in a way that discourages creativity or individual responsibility?

    1. Kevin Marks talks about the bridging of new people into one's in-group by Twitter's retweet functionality from a positive perspective.

      He doesn't foresee the deleterious effects of algorithms for engagement doing just the opposite of increasing the volume of noise based on one's in-group hating and interacting with "bad" content in the other direction. Some of these effects may also be bad from a slow brainwashing perspective if not protected for.

    2. https://youtu.be/qYsMtroVLeA?t=287

      The big thing that I want to talk about here is out groups. This is a phenomenon that we that we see, which is that it's very very easy for people to decide that someone else is not like them they're different and they should be shunned and talked about.

      This is the minimal group paradigm. Thanks to Rashmi for giving that term. [It] says the smallest possible difference will be magnified into in group and an outgroup. Kevin Marks, Web 2.0 Expo NY 09: "...New Words You Need to Know to Understand the Web"

      Perhaps we can decrease the levels of fear and racism in our society by tummelling? By bringing in outsiders, treating them with dignity and respect within your own group of friends, you can help to normalize their presence by decreasing the irrational fears that others have built up and carry with them about these supposed outsiders.

    1. Die Bewertung der direkten Gefährdung durch Laserstrahlung erfolgt mithilfe des Vergleichs der Exposition durch die Laserstrahlung von Auge oder Haut mit den jeweiligen Expositionsgrenzwerten, welche eine Grenze für einen Augen- oder Hautschaden darstellen.

      Was kann ich aus dieser Information lernen?

    2. Bewertung der direkten Gefährdung durch Laserstrahlung erfolgt mithilfe des Vergleichs der Exposition durch die Laserstrahlung

      Noch ein wichtiger Kommentar

  12. Aug 2021
  13. Jul 2021
  14. Jun 2021
    1. One way to do this is by using first-party data to connect in-store transactions back to digital advertising campaigns.

      I work for a jewelry store and get to see all of this happening first hand. I believe this is like what we did when Covid hit and our store kept closing down and re opening. We use Shopify that is linked to our website and then I have a Shopify POS system in store that helps keep everything connected. So I believe that is an example of this.

  15. May 2021
    1. So the truth is that the influencer economy is just a garish accentuation of the economy writ large. As our culture continues to conflate the private and public realms—as the pandemic has transformed our homes into offices and our bedrooms into backdrops, as public institutions increasingly fall prey to the mandates of the market—we’ve become cheerfully indentured to the idea that our worth as individuals isn’t our personal integrity or sense of virtue, but our ability to advertise our relevance on the platforms of multinational tech corporations.
    1. Systems for encoding, transmission, and protection of essential knowledge for group survival and cohesion were developed by multiple cultures long before the advent of alphabetic writing.

      Focusing in on the phrase:

      essential knowledge for group survival

      makes me wonder if we haven't evolutionarily primed ourselves to use knowledge and group knowledge in particular to create group cohesion and therefor survival?

      Cross reference: https://hyp.is/LWtjtLhjEeuTqHPwUUMUbA/threadreaderapp.com/thread/1381933685713289216.html and the paper https://www.academia.edu/46814693/The_Signaling_Function_of_Sharing_Fake_Stories

    1. Examples of this sort of non-logical behaviour used to represent identity can be found in fiction in:

      • Dr. Seuss' The Butter Battle Book (Random House,1984) which is based on
      • the war between Lilliput and Blefuscu in Jonathan Swift's 1726 satire Gulliver's Travels, which was based on an argument over the correct end to crack an egg once soft-boiled.

      It almost seems related to creating identity politics as bike-shedding because the real issues are so complex that most people can't grasp all the nuances, so it's easier to choose sides based on some completely other heuristic. Changing sides later on causes too much cognitive dissonance, so once on a path, one must stick to it.

  16. commonplace.knowledgefutures.org commonplace.knowledgefutures.org
    1. This almost appears to be a small, community-based commonplace book.

      And apparently published on PubPub.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Samuel Klein</span> in Samuel Klein on Twitter: "@flancian See also https://t.co/KMmU7pDuQx" / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>05/18/2021 19:30:42</time>)</cite></small>

  17. Apr 2021
  18. Mar 2021
  19. Feb 2021
    1. Typically, a process associated with a controlling terminal is foreground process and its process group is called foreground process group. When you start a process from the command line, it's a foreground process:
    1. The shell process itself is in yet another process group all of its own and so doesn't receive the signal when one of those process groups is in the foreground. It's that simple.
    2. Switching "jobs" between foreground and background is (some details aside) a matter of the shell telling the terminal which process group is now the foreground one.
  20. Jan 2021
    1. Utterly encapsulating gapless dark ambient experience.

      Now there's a touchstone for the ages

  21. Dec 2020
  22. Nov 2020
    1. EBF was much more potent than Pax5 in inducing B celldevelopment, as its expression in MPPs yielded at least 100-foldmore B lineage progeny than did expression of Pax5 (Fig. 3band data not shown). These data suggest that promotion of B cellgeneration from MPPs by EBF is not mediated solely throughactivation of Pax5 expression.

      EBF expression represses and restricts alternative lineage genes, also help promote B cell independently of Pax 5.

    1. We do not utilize a formulaic or standard, formalized benchmarking level or element in setting our executive compensation relative to that of other companies. 
  23. Oct 2020
    1. It happened in 2000, when Gore had more popular votes than Bush yet fewer electoral votes, but that was the first time since 1888.

      it happened again in 2016

    1. Subgroups of the computer underground with different attitudes and motives use different terms to demarcate themselves from each other. These classifications are also used to exclude specific groups with whom they do not agree.
    1. The default groups, that we talked about before, like domain users and domain admins are security groups. They're used to grant or deny access to IT resources.
    2. A distribution group, is only designed to group accounts and contacts for email communication. You can't use distribution groups for assigning permission to resources.
  24. moodle.southwestern.edu moodle.southwestern.edu
    1. unbiased

      The Republican party will never stop claiming the media is bias, so I am surprised they are claiming they have resolved this issue. I would think they would want to keep acknowledging it as an issue.

  25. moodle.southwestern.edu moodle.southwestern.edu
    1. "The President has been regulating to death a free market economy" - it's interesting how much this preamble throws Trump under the bus

    2. "our enemies no longer fear us and our friends no long trust us" - I guess the democrats and republicans agree on this.

    3. "This platform is optimistic because the American people are optimistic." This is completely unsupported by everything stated before it.

    4. "covenant" "Creator" "God-given natural resources" "prepared to deal with evil in the world" show religious tone

    1. Friends and foes alike neither admire nor fear President Trump’s leadership

      I feel like there are countries who fear his leadership.

    2. The challenges before us—the worst public health crisis in a century, the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, the worst period of global upheaval in a generation, the urgent global crisis posed by climate change, the intolerable racial injustice that still stains the fabric of our nation—will test America’s character like never before.

      I know that we are making history but it doesn't exactly feel like it. The election feels like a joke. There is a stark difference between what came out of Roosevelt's mouth and either of the presidential candidates mouth's. Now it is a matter of choosing the lesser of two evils than a heroic leader to help our country achieve greatness.

    3. a more perfect union

      I feel like this goal has been abandoned.

  26. Sep 2020
    1. So how should we think about federalism in the ageof coronavirus? The answer is to emphasize theimportance of building social solidarity — the beliefin a shared fate for all Americans that transcendsstate or regional identities

      What makes Americans not have a social solidarity?

    2. institutional antagonism willprevent the concentration of power, encouragesindividualist mentalities that lead to self-interestedactions and erode national unity.

      What makes Americans so individualistic? What is different about Taiwan’s society that made their people more selfless?

    1. “We’re changing federalism from the idea of shared expertise in different policy areas into partisan stakes in the ground that are meant to obstruct opponents,” Robertson says.

      This is so true with the Trump Administrations "Alternative Facts" it is as though we will soon be living in the dystopian novel Brave New World.

    2. “The coronavirus response is actually sort of a perfect measuring stick of our transition to our contemporary, very polarized model of federalism.”

      I want to reference the Netflix documentary Social Dilemma. The documentary says that the reason politics has become so polarized is because of social media. Everyone is operating off of a different set of facts.

    3. He has threatened to withhold federal funds from school districts that don’t open for in-person instruction.

      Is it within Trump's right to do this?

    4. He has threatened to withhold federal funds from school districts that don’t open for in-person instruction.

      Is it within trump's rights to do this?