59 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. appelons qu’en 2011, la Ville de Québec invitait la population, dans le cadre du Plan de mobilité durable de la Ville de Québec, à collaborer à la réalisation de projets collectifs en matière d'aménagement et de mobilité durable. Dans ce contexte, le Comité des citoyens et citoyennes du quartier Saint-Sauveur et le Conseil de quartier de Saint-Sauveur ont élaboré de 2011 à 2016 le premier plan de mobilité durable de quartier sur le territoire de la Ville de Québec. Au total, ce sont plus de 2500 heures de bénévolat et d'implication citoyenne qui ont été enregistrées lors des différentes activités.

      zone commentaire 1

  2. Feb 2019
  3. Jan 2019
  4. Sep 2018
    1. Snapchat says it reaches 28.5 to 30 million 18-24 year old users in the U.S. According to a recent survey of Instagram users, approximately 32 percent of its 1 billion-strong user base is 18-24.

      Snapchat reaches around 30 million 18-24 year old users; important ages that are more recently able to vote and take political action. Instagram and snapchat are most popular amongst younger users.

  5. Aug 2018
    1. Largest census metropolitan areas in Canada by population (2016 Census) viewtalkedit CMA Province Population CMA Province Population Toronto Ontario 5,928,040 London Ontario 494,069 Montreal Quebec 4,098,927 St. Catharines–Niagara Ontario 406,074 Vancouver British Columbia 2,463,431 Halifax Nova Scotia 403,390 Calgary Alberta 1,392,609 Oshawa Ontario 379,848 Ottawa–Gatineau Ontario–Quebec 1,323,783 Victoria British Columbia 367,770 Edmonton Alberta 1,321,426 Windsor Ontario 329,144 Quebec Quebec 800,296 Saskatoon Saskatchewan 295,095 Winnipeg Manitoba 778,489 Regina Saskatchewan 236,481 Hamilton Ontario 747,545 Sherbrooke Quebec 212,105 Kitchener–Cambridge–Waterloo Ontario

      5928040

    2. Largest census metropolitan areas in Canada by population (2016 Census) viewtalkedit CMA Province Population CMA Province Population Toronto Ontario 5,928,040 London Ontario 494,069 Montreal Quebec 4,098,927 St. Catharines–Niagara Ontario 406,074 Vancouver British Columbia 2,463,431 Halifax Nova Scotia 403,390 Calgary Alberta 1,392,609

      4098927

    3. Vancouver British Columbia 2,463,431

      2463431

    4. Largest census metropolitan areas in Canada by population (2016 Census) viewtalkedit CMA Province Population CMA Province Population Toronto Ontario 5,928,040 London Ontario 494,069 Montreal Quebec 4,098,927 St. Catharines–Niagara Ontario 406,074 Vancouver British Columbia 2,463,431 Halifax Nova Scotia 403,390 Calgary Alberta 1,392,609
    1. 1 Sydney NSW 5,131,326 11 Hobart Tas 224,462 BrisbanePerth 2 Melbourne Vic 4,850,740 12 Geelong Vic 192,393 3 Brisbane Qld 2,408,223 13 Townsville Qld 178,864 4 Perth WA 2,043,138 14 Cairns Qld 150,041 5 Adelaide SA 1,333,927

      5131326

    2. 2 Melbourne Vic 4,850,740

      4850740

    3. 4 Perth WA 2,043,138

      2043138

    4. 5 Adelaide SA 1,333,927

      1333927

    1. Region Capital Area (km2) Area (sq mi) Population Nominal GDP EURO billions (2016)[148] Nominal GDP EURO per capita(2016) [149] Abruzzo L'Aquila 10,763 4,156 1,331,574 32 24,100 Aosta Valley Aosta 3,263 1,260 128,298 4 34,900 Apulia Bari 19,358 7,474 4,090,105 72 17,800 Basilicata Potenza 9,995 3,859 576,619 12 20,600 Calabria Catanzaro 15,080 5,822 1,976,631 33 16,800 Campania Naples 13,590 5,247 5,861,529 107 18,300 Emilia-Romagna Bologna 22,446 8,666 4,450,508 154 34,600 Friuli-Venezia Giulia Trieste 7,858 3,034 1,227,122 37 30,300 Lazio Rome 17,236 6,655 5,892,425 186 31,600 Liguria Genoa 5,422 2,093 1,583,263 48 30,800 Lombardy Milan 23,844 9,206 10,002,615 367 36,600 Marche Ancona 9,366 3,616 1,550,796 41 26,600 Molise Campobasso 4,438 1,713 313,348 6 20,000 Piedmont Turin 25,402 9,808 4,424,467 129 29,400 Sardinia Cagliari 24,090 9,301 1,663,286 34 20,300 Sicily Palermo 25,711 9,927 5,092,080 87 17,200 Tuscany Florence 22,993 8,878 3,752,654

      3752654

    2. Liguria Genoa 5,422 2,093 1,583,263 48 30,800 Lombardy Milan 23,844 9,206 10,002,615 367 36,600

      1583263

    3. Region Capital Area (km2) Area (sq mi) Population Nominal GDP EURO billions (2016)[148] Nominal GDP EURO per capita(2016) [149] Abruzzo L'Aquila 10,763 4,156 1,331,574 32 24,100 Aosta Valley Aosta 3,263 1,260 128,298 4 34,900 Apulia Bari 19,358 7,474 4,090,105 72 17,800 Basilicata Potenza 9,995 3,859 576,619 12 20,600 Calabria Catanzaro 15,080 5,822 1,976,631 33 16,800 Campania Naples 13,590 5,247 5,861,529 107 18,300 Emilia-Romagna Bologna 22,446 8,666 4,450,508 154 34,600 Friuli-Venezia Giulia Trieste 7,858 3,034 1,227,122 37 30,300 Lazio Rome 17,236 6,655 5,892,425 186 31,600 Liguria Genoa 5,422 2,093 1,583,263 48 30,800 Lombardy Milan 23,844 9,206 10,002,615 367 36,600 Marche Ancona 9,366 3,616 1,550,796 41 26,600 Molise Campobasso 4,438 1,713 313,348 6 20,000 Piedmont Turin 25,402 9,808 4,424,467 129 29,400 Sardinia Cagliari 24,090 9,301 1,663,286 34 20,300 Sicily Palermo 25,711 9,927 5,092,080 87 17,200 Tuscany Florence 22,993 8,878 3,752,654 112 30,000 Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol Trento 13,607 5,254 1,055,934 42 39,755 Umbria Perugia 8,456 3,265 894,762 21 24,000 Veneto Venice 18,399 7,104 4,927,596 156 31,700

      4450508

  6. Jun 2018
  7. Nov 2017
  8. Oct 2017
    1. In 1873, the Italian geologist and priest Antonio Stoppani suggested that our technologies, infrastructures, and patterns of land use had created fundamental changes in Earth’s systems, propelling us into what he called an ‘anthropozoic era’

      Note : Read over Article again by Will Steffen, Paull J Crutzen & John R McNeill. [] (https://www.pik-potsdam.de/news/public-events/archiv/alter-net/former-ss/2007/05-09.2007/steffen/literature/ambi-36-08-06_614_621.pdf)

      Explore development of Anthropocence. How do we track progression of Anthropocene? CO2 Emissions??

  9. May 2017
    1. 66,000 Russians living in Eastern Siberia as opposed to the 247,000 in the west.

      This proportion would not change for the next 200 years, despite the large increase in populations in Siberia. In 1897, the huge eastern territory had a population of 909,000 Russian inhabitants, while the west had three times more.

      Forsyth, James. A history of the peoples of Siberia: Russia's north Asian colony, 1581-1990. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1992.

  10. Mar 2017
    1. Porcupine caribou herd

      The Porcupine caribou herd is one of the largest migratory barren-ground caribou herds found in North America. The range of the herd spans over 250,000 square kilometers in the northern tundra. In the spring, the herd migrates between Alaska and Yukon’s arctic coast. In the winter, the herd ventures into Yukon’s Ogilvie Mountains. Although the majority of the land in the range of the herd is undeveloped, there are certain key areas which have been industrialized. Oil and gas exploration in the Eagle Plains basin interrupts the winter range of the Porcupine caribou herd. Also affecting the herd’s winter range are the Dempster Highway and mineral exploration in the Peel River watershed. The Dempster Highway connects Inuvik to Dawson City (Porcupine Caribou Management Board).

      Regarding population size of the Porcupine caribou herd, according to the Arctic journal, “migratory wild reindeer and caribou numbers have dropped by about one-third since populations peaked in the 1990s and early 2000s”. There are natural periods of abundance and scarcity among migratory tundra caribou herds. These increases and decreases in population size are likely results of “continental climate switches” (Gunn et al. 2009, iii). Since the first population survey in the early 1970s, the Porcupine Caribou Management Board has conducted a survey every two years and reports that the population size has fluctuated between 100,000 and 200,000 animals (Porcupine Caribou Management Board). A detailed graph estimating the size of the population of the Porcupine caribou herd is shown below.

      For further information, please consider the following link to The Porcupine Caribou Management Board (PCMB) webpage: http://www.pcmb.ca/.

      References

      Gunn, Anne, Don Russell, Robert G. White, and Gary Kofinas. "Facing a Future of Change: Wild Migratory Caribou and Reindeer." Arctic 62, no. 3 (2009): Iii-Vi. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40513303.

      Porcupine Caribou Management Board. "The Porcupine Caribou Management Board (PCMB)." Porcupine Caribou Management Board. Accessed March 08, 2017. http://www.pcmb.ca/.

    2. Canadian Wildlife Service

      The Canadian Wildlife Service organization was originally founded under the name of the Dominion Wildlife Service in November 1947. There were about thirty staff members of the organization at this time. In 1950, the organization’s name was changed to its current title of the Canadian Wildlife Service. The three main focuses of the Canadian Wildlife Service have been and continue to be the management of migratory birds, the management of game and furbearing mammals, and the enforcement of international treaties to ensure conservation of species. In order to accomplish these tasks, the Canadian Wildlife Service has conducted extensive research regarding population, population ecology, survival factors, migration patterns, limnological studies, environmental toxicology, and endangered species evaluation and protection of several species of the Arctic. Examples of these species include elk, moose, bison, caribou, muskoxen, polar bears, wolves, arctic foxes, geese, ducks, songbirds, seabirds, trumpeter swans, whooping cranes, and peregrine falcons. Additionally, the Canadian Wildlife Service has been tasked with the management of National Parks and the creation of public education programs (Burnett et al. 1999).

      During the 1970s, the Canadian Wildlife Service researched and reported on the reproductive success of the black-crowned night heron on Pigeon Island of Lake Ontario (Price 1978), biology of the Kaminuriak population of barren-ground caribou (Arctic 1977), hunting of and attacks by polar bears along the Manitoba coast of Hudson Bay (Jonkel et al. 1976), biology and management of bears (Bears: Their Biology and Management 1976), and many other environmental and biological concerns regarding the wildlife of the Arctic.

      Additional information and the current contact information of the Canadian Wildlife Service can be found at: https://www.ec.gc.ca/paom-itmb/default.asp?lang=En&n=5f569149-1.

      References

      "Books Received." Arctic 30, no. 1 (1977): 67-68.<br> http://www.jstor.org/stable/40508780.

      Burnett, J. A., and Canadian Wildlife Service. 1999. A Passion for Wildlife: A History of the Canadian Wildlife Service, 1947-1997 and Selected Publications from Work by the Canadian Wildlife Service. Canadian field-naturalist, v. 113, no. 1; Canadian field-naturalist, v. 113, no. 1.

      Jonkel, Charles, Ian Stirling, and Richard Robertson. "The Popular Bears of Cape Churchill." Bears: Their Biology and Management 3 (1976): 301-02. doi:10.2307/3872777.

      "Preface." Bears: Their Biology and Management 3 (1976): 7. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3872749.

      Price, Iola. "Black-Crowned Night Heron Reproductive Success on Pigeon Island, Lake Ontario 1972- 1977 (Abstract Only)." Proceedings of the Colonial Waterbird Group 1 (1978): 166. doi:10.2307/1520916.

    3. Bluenose caribou herd

      Many of the same concerns regarding the well-being of the Bluenose caribou herd in the Berger Inquiry are still being discussed today due to continued industrial exploration, specifically regarding oil and gas, in the Northwest Territories and the Arctic. Since oil and gas are still valued resources in our current societies, exploration continues in the North, as described by Anne Dunn and her colleagues in the 2009 Arctic publication. These concerns include changes of habitat due to the introduction or industrial development such as roads, oilfields, mines, etc. The attraction of job opportunity to areas surrounding the Bluenose caribou herd could potentially cause an increase in demand of caribou meat. Increased income as a result of employment for industrial exploration allows for the advancement of hunting methods regarding the locating of caribou and utilization of year-round roads implemented originally for industrial exploration. The concerns regarding the Bluenose East and Bluenose West caribou herds of the Northwest Territories result specifically from oil and gas exploration (Gunn et al. 2009, iii).

      Besides industrial exploration, there are concerns about the population and survival of the Bluenose caribou herd surrounding climate trends. Specifically, warmer temperatures will affect the environmental conditions in which the caribou rely on for sustenance. An increased temperature in the wintertime could correspond to more freeze-thaw cycles (Gunn et al. 2009, iii).

      Regarding population size, according to the Arctic journal, “migratory wild reindeer and caribou numbers have dropped by about one-third since populations peaked in the 1990s and early 2000s”. There are natural periods of abundance and scarcity among migratory tundra caribou herds. These increases and decreases in population size are likely results of “continental climate switches” (Gunn et al. 2009, iii). According to the Northwest Territories Environment and Natural Resources division, the Bluenose West caribou herd was estimated to have population of 112,000 in 1992. In 2015, its population was estimated to be approximately 15,000. The Bluenose East caribou herd was estimated to have a population of 104,000 in 2000. In 2015, its population was estimated to be between 35,000 and 40,000 (Northwest Territories).

      References

      Gunn, Anne, Don Russell, Robert G. White, and Gary<br> Kofinas. "Facing a Future of Change: Wild<br> Migratory Caribou and Reindeer." Arctic 62, no. 3 (2009): Iii-Vi. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40513303.

      Northwest Territories: Environment and Natural Resources. "Barren-ground Caribou: Northern Herds." Environment and Natural Resources. Accessed March 08, 2017. http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/node/2979.

  11. Oct 2016
  12. Sep 2016
  13. online.salempress.com.lacademy.idm.oclc.org online.salempress.com.lacademy.idm.oclc.org
    1. 95 percent of Salvadorans.

      thats a pretty large poplation...

    2. Most Salvadorans are Christian. About 57 percent of the population identifies with the Roman Catholic Church, and much of the remainder is Protestant.

      What are the other religions in El Salvador? And how do they celebrate there religion? Like what are there traditions?

    3. (In 2011, the estimated population of the San Salvador metropolitan area was unofficially 2.44 million.)

      This is about 1/3 of the population for the entire country. Thats a lot of people in one place at one time for a country that small.

    4. The average population density is approximately 299 persons per square kilometer (774 per square mile).

      This means that El Salvador is clearly a small country, because if there is about 6 million people for the population, and there is 774 people per square mile, the amount of land is small.

  14. Aug 2016
    1. littleblack man—the smallest I have ever see

      As shown in an example earlier, in which Holmes references a book for descriptions of various nationalities, this quote is another example of Doyle giving an idea of the diversity in London at this time. As also explained in the article I have attached, while many different nationalities had migrated to London at this time very few were of different appearance.

    1. Should nonviolent drug offendersbe sent to prison?

      Sub-question and division in the topic. Also specifies a particular population in the issue. Maybe you wish to focus only on nonviolent drug offenses.

  15. Apr 2016
    1. n order to obtain an accurate estimate of true completion, and thus population, one must bias-correct the observed re-detection ratio to estimate the true completion as a function of size of asteroid. We do this with a computer model simulating actual surveys.