27 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2020
  2. Jul 2020
  3. May 2020
    1. What's terrible and dangerous is a faceless organization deciding to arbitrarily and silently control what I can and can not do with my browser on my computer. Orwell is screaming in his grave right now. This is no different than Mozilla deciding I don't get to visit Tulsi Gabbard's webpage because they don't like her politics, or I don't get to order car parts off amazon because they don't like hyundai, or I don't get to download mods for minecraft, or talk to certain people on facebook.
    2. They don't have to host the extension on their website, but it's absolutely and utterly unacceptable for them to interfere with me choosing to come to github and install it.
    3. I appreciate the vigilance, but it would be even better to actually publish a technical reasoning for why do you folks believe Firefox is above the device owner, and the root user, and why there should be no possibility through any means and configuration protections to enable users to run their own code in the release version of Firefox.
  4. Apr 2020
  5. Dec 2019
  • Feb 2019
    1. giving the human the minute-by-minute services of a digital computer equipped with computer-driven cathode-ray-tube display

      Sitting there with a smartphone one might smirk at the mention of a CRT display, but remember when this was written-- screens were way way off from being a "normal" interface for computer interaction

  • Dec 2018
  • Jun 2018
  • Feb 2018
    1. They now stand out as the only one in the class (or, if they’re lucky, one of two) who gets to use a device while other students wonder just why they get to use one. I have seen a couple of students on social media say that as soon as they see a “no devices” policy on a syllabus they drop the class because of this concern.

      Good rationale for not enacting a blanket classroom tech ban

  • Dec 2017
  • Oct 2016
  • Sep 2016
  • Oct 2015
  • Nov 2013
    1. Once upon a time, in some out of the way corner of that universe which is dispersed into numberless twinkling solar systems, there was a star upon which clever beasts invented knowing. That was the most arrogant and mendacious minute of "world history," but nevertheless, it was only a minute. After nature had drawn a few breaths, the star cooled and congealed, and the clever beasts had to die.

      Great use of fable to hyper illuminate his central theme right away. It's colorful, dramatic, poignant, and a little unnerving, altogether engaging.

  • Sep 2013