36 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. Teaching problem solving This page is included because some of our theories indicate that problem solving should be taught specifically. This page is a bit unusual; I did not find many others like it. It is rather easy to read and also addresses the differences between novice and expert learners. rating 3/5

  2. Feb 2019
    1. Motivating Learners

      Notes from Video -embracing change -hardcore gamers- surprising things that you find- kids are incredibly bottom-line oriented- want to be measured to see how much they are improving -"if i am not learning, then i am not having fun"- embracing change, leveling up, higher order tasks, or the game is changing -Questioning position helps students to embrace change -Compete with each other and collaborate each other -Start looking at other people online to help them to learn new things -kids that have been turned on to learning- there is no stopping them -passionate community interest group that students can join -learning has to do with learning how to join a group with a common interest -what you are doing becomes a platform for something new -trajectories through life pace as opposed to fixed points -power and importance of play- how to I take an idea and play with it to become something new -learn that not everything works- need to be willing to realize that instead of being afraid of things not working- we need to be willing to change what hasnt worked to make it work for us

  3. Nov 2018
    1. One of the most striking features of the quantitative and qualitative data from first- and second-semester German students is that the students interact directly with each other, as opposed to interacting mainly with the teacher. The changed role of teacher and students

    1. This article takes a different perspective on technological integration, showing that sometimes technology, when used improperly, can set a class backwards.Examples in the article clearly show that effective use of technology is extremely important, otherwise the technology may cause more problems than it offers solutions.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This article takes the perspective that education should not necessarily be solely focused on educational experiences, as we tend to do. Rather, technology should also have a focus in supporting non-academic areas and using data to drive instruction.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. This research takes an interesting look into the role gender plays in self-efficacy in technology. The research finds that self-efficacy in technology was primarily effected by gender and gender roles, not specifically by biological sex.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. Several problems and barriers to technological integration are often included in the discussion about using technology in higher education, however it is less common that solutions are presented. This article proposes solutions for transforming educational technology through personalized experiences and collaboration.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This article suggests that perhaps keeping updated and informed on technology can prevent the shut-down and closure of specific degrees and the departments they come from. Technology is constantly changing, and it is expected that institutions will change with it. Rating: 7/10

    1. Early Attrition among First Time eLearners: A Review of Factors that Contribute to Drop-out, Withdrawal and Non-completion Rates of Adult Learners undertaking eLearning Programmes

      NEW - This study researches dropout rates in eLearning. There are many reasons for attrition with adult eLearners which can be complex and entwined. The researched provide different models to test and also a list of barriers to eLearning - where technology issues ranked first. In conclusion, the authors determined that further research was necessary to continue to identify the factors that contribute to adult learner attrition.

      RATING: 7/10

    1. The paper argues that the adult learning environment can in some instances be a ‘double-edged sword’, in that it can both enhance and limit student engagement.

      This article is about a study performed on both students and teachers about the adult learning environment and the pro and cons. They call it a "double edge sword" because there are different positives and drawbacks.

    1. This site includes five highly effective technological resources that instructors can use in their higher ed classrooms. What is especially useful about this site is that it includes a rationale for all the proposed technologies, ensuring that the technology is not just including in lesson planning for technology's sake.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. We often talk about avoiding the use of technology for technology's sake and ensuring here is relevance in the integration. This site lays out specific characteristics of effective technologies in the classroom.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This article brings up the important issue of accessibility as a barrier to technology integration. It is suggested that accessibility should be a much more pressing concern than technological relevance to a lesson plan. First it is important to know whether or not all students will still have equal access and ability to reach mastery with the deliver method provided.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. This article focuses on the importance of using technological integration in the classroom correctly and effectively. Barriers to effectiveness, as the article states, are often linked to lack of rational, vision, or necessity for including technology in instruction.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This is scholarly article that shares research findings in questions such as, to what extent is there a relationship between faculty's comfortableness with technology and perception of technology integration and student success? The data is very interesting, including the fact that students in the sample reported being most proficient with a printer and least proficient with a smarboard. This definitely indicates a shift in what technological knowledge a professor will need verses their students.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This website details a case study that was performed in order to determine the effectiveness of online advising (a position I am currently involved in myself). There were several studies conducted and student responses are detailed in charts-- overwhelmingly, students felt the online advising format was a success.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. This article gives a few quick insights into how technology is useful in academic advising. This article makes the distinction between technology "complementing" advising and actually impacting student success. In other words, technology should never be a sole substitute for success. I would like to see more numerical-based data supporting the claims listed, but there are some great resources cited.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. This site gives a thorough overview into the integration of technology in the classroom. The most helpful element it includes is a list of limitations to consider within this integration. The downside is you will have to "dig" a little through the article to find the solutions to these problems, as they are not immediately obvious. Rating: 8/10

    1. Self-directed learning is independent—it provides the learner with the ability to make choices, to take responsibility for their own learning, and “the capacity to articulate the norms and limits of learned society, and personal values and beliefs” (Goddu, 2012).In self-directed learning, the instructor shifts from the leader of the learning experience to the “facilitator of learning,” becoming“a source to be tapped, as required by the learner” (Robotham 1995, as cited in Goddu 2012). Self-directed learning provides students with the “opportunity and freedom to choose the means of acquiring knowledge that is best suited” to them based on their own self-knowledge (Alex et al., 2007). In online or blended environments, self-directed learning canbe offered through the creation of “dynamic learning environments where students may go beyond content presented by the instructor to explore, interact with, comment on, modify, and apply the set content and additional content they discover or create through the learning process” (LeNoue, 2011).

      This article reviews effective teaching characteristics and effective teaching methods and strategies to engage adult learners. The piece goes further in exploring five specific teaching methods to support adult learning: self-directed, active, experiential, collaborative, and narrative.

      9/10

    1. Learning a Map of Environment: The Role of Visuo-Spatial Abilities inYoung and Older Adults

      This study focused on the difference in visuo-spatial relations between younger adults and older adults. The purpose was tol determine the effect of aging on visuo-spatial relations.<br> Both groups performed the same tasks using a simplified map for orientation, pointing out locations, and recreating the map. The results indicated that older adults successfully completed the tasks at a lower rate and that males successfully completed tasks more that women. The researches highly recommended other duplicate the study to determine if the results can be generalized and consistent. This study is a valuable indication of the changing needs of adult learners due to aging. Rating: 8/10

  4. content.ebscohost.com content.ebscohost.com
    1. Toward constructivism for adult learners in online learning environments

      This is an article from 2002 that identified the emerging need of online, adult learners. One concept is the use of cognitive learning theory as tools for the online learning environment.<br> Several descriptors identified who the adult online student is, primarily adult working women with full time jobs and a family (often single head of household) who are trying to return to school to improve personal circumstances.

      This article is a invitation to review the learning environment that was devised and determine if it met the needs of students then and what changes need to be implemented for today's students.

      Rating 9/10

  5. Sep 2018
    1. This ideaof deploying dominant culture against the dominant classes is a familiar aspect of South African history. African Nationalist leaders such as Mandela and Tambo were in no way deceived by their missionary education but usedit as a sort of “common school,” arming them for the struggle against apartheid.

      I find this article to be neglectful of our own agency -- that we learn and bring back to our own family and community that which helps us live and work together. And this paragraph holds most meaning to me-- and it reminded me of Sitting Bull who said, "When you find something good on the whiteman’s road, pick it up; but when you find something bad, or it turns out bad, drop it and leave it alone." https://flic.kr/p/NMPuKG

      There are many truths within all of these [I found page 7 of the most interest]. I think about the propaganda that is permeating our online discourse-- and I think we all are getting smarter in our engagement or refusal to do so. And I see more polite disagreement recently. Because, with time, we strive for truth, even when we must revise our own thinking. We choose, no matter what is forced or imposed. Education matters. Schools matter. And learners take that which best benefits them. We see in schools kids not learning that which they deem not relevant-- so the transformation will come from the students expectations, I think. Consider the whole of our world, and what people have done with what they have learned. I don't think the hidden agenda, if there is one, works quite like these academics think -- when we consider the progress -- and how we are overcoming any back steps -- that exists in the world.

      Education is not just school: it's wherever we are and how we connect with others to understand it.

  6. Feb 2018
    1. They now stand out as the only one in the class (or, if they’re lucky, one of two) who gets to use a device while other students wonder just why they get to use one. I have seen a couple of students on social media say that as soon as they see a “no devices” policy on a syllabus they drop the class because of this concern.

      Good rationale for not enacting a blanket classroom tech ban

  7. May 2017
  8. Apr 2017
  9. Nov 2016
    1. Unfortunately, many focus on skills rather than literacies.

      True. It's also worth noting that some may be tempted to think that 21st century learners are "tech savvy" by default...but this is not really the case. The students were born and brought up during the age of digital technology but that doesn't mean they will naturally excel in the digital world without any form of guidance.

  10. Sep 2016
    1. narratives that pit students, teachers, and publics against one another

      Recalls one of Audrey Watters’s key points about the Blockchain in Education (based, in this case, on Neil Selwyn).

  11. Jun 2016
    1. Students require little in the way of special messaging

      Useful to point out. There’s so much distrust of learners…