44 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. Ashley Norris is the Chief Academic Officer at ProctorU, an organization that provides online exam proctoring for schools. This article has an interesting overview of the negative side of technology advancements and what that has meant for student's ability to cheat. While the article does culminate as an ad, of sorts, for ProctorU, it is an interesting read and sparks thoughts on ProctorU's use of both human monitors for testing but also their integration of Artificial Intelligence into the process.

      Rating: 9/10.

    1. The article, published in Cornell University's React publication, is an overview of technology that is currently being used in the classroom. There is an overview of interactive abilities using these technologies and a conclusion that technology should always be used to enhance and not replace.

      Rating: 6/10. Short.

    1. This journal article, written by Amaury Nora, who is currently the Dean for Research at the University of Texas San Antonio and Blanca Plazas Snyder who was pursuing a degree in educational psychology at the time this article as written. The author's bring an honest review of technology and include the benefits, the downfalls and they identify areas where more research needs to be conducted (especially around student persistence).

      Rating: 9/10. The article is informative and takes many perspectives. The only flaw is that when discussing technology in Higher Education, this article is from 2008, but it was also helpful to get the perspective from 10 years ago.

  2. Mar 2019
    1. This article contains the following sections:Getting Started Integrating Technology Across the Access Spectrum Getting to "Seamless" Integration Tips for Shared Hardware Creating a Professional-Development Plan Hardware and Equipment Using Technology for Feedback and Assessment The Role of Digital Citizenship

      Edutopia presents multiple ways to integrate technology into the classroom efficiently and effectively. The article begins with how to get started. This will help the average teacher create a seamless integration of technology. Then, it moves on to how to use technology across the curriculum, how the school can provide effective professional development to aid in teacher success and how the role of digital citizenship can make or break the effectiveness of the integration.

      Rating 10/10

    1. Effective Classroom Practices To Transform Education DOI:https://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264293243-en Teachers are the most important school-related factor influencing student learning. Teachers can help level the playing field and provide opportunities for success to all their students. They can inspire students to innovate; to think and reflect and to work in collaboration with others.

      This 116 page document includes everything from how to effectively use technology in the classroom to alternative education methods as a lever for teaching innovation. The section I found most helpful was how to effectively use technology in the classroom starting on page 75. Rating 8/10

    1. Effective Integration of Technology and Instructor-Led Training to Promote Soft Skills Mastery

      The Access Technologies Group published this article to discuss purposeful use of technology in ILT environments whose goal was to teach soft skills. The article claims that blended learning is the ideal delivery technique because it provides the ease of e-learning with the face-to-face time necessary to develop soft skills. It is critical to the success of the training program to integrate e-learning and ILT seamlessly to ensure the two produce synergy without limiting themselves or each other. It is also important that the learners are provided with an environment that suits their learning needs best. Technology and ILT can both provide ways to meet those needs, and where one lacks, the other can fill in. 8/10

    1. Learning Technologies that Increase the Impact of Classroom Training

      Training Industry published this article about some learning technologies that increase the impact of classroom training. These can include class-oriented webpages, multimedia presentations, and activities, as well as web-based scoring systems and supplements. For instance, learners could collectively create a blog or a webcast and use those tools to communicate with each other to help facilitate learning. This is helpful when teaching a technology-fluent group that is excited to do hands-on activities. 6/10

    1. Teaching with technology

      The University of Wisconsin - Madison published this helpful, quick guide to assist instructors in using technology to teach others. It discusses some of the technology available to help teach, including Microsoft products, Blackboard, Kaltura, and others. It also discusses some of the tools the school uses to facilitate blended learning. This includes Google Apps, technology-equipped classrooms, and a Quality Matters subscription that helps produce high-quality blended learning products. It is important to incorporate technology in the classroom because it helps to facilitate learning and engage learners. 5/10

    1. classroom assessment techniques These are quick ways to complete formative assessment during a class session. The results can help the instructor determine what he or she should address. it can unearth learner misconceptions. These were designed for college classrooms but can be used in other adult learning contexts. rating 4/5

  3. Feb 2019
  4. Jan 2019
    1. one of the most pervasive topics of concern and frustration that I address in my workshops with faculty members and graduate teaching assistants is classroom incivility

      GTAs at Portland State often ask for more training around conflict resolution and difficult conversations.

  5. Dec 2018
    1. This blog post from the Copyright Licensing Agency based in England explains the main concerns surrounding copyright in college and education settings.

    1. The notion of exploratory speech is central to the "writing to learn" approach in which writers are granted the opportunity to think through writing, no matter what that writing looks like at first glance. In this approach, not all writing is designed to be read as coherent by readers other than the author. Rather, the idea is to use writing as a way to think through a problem.

      People write differently when they know that it is just fro them and they are the only one who is going to read it

  6. Nov 2018
    1. Factors influencing teachers’ adoption and integration of information and communication technology into teaching: A review of the literature

      This article is a review of literature regarding what influences teachers to adopt and integrate information and communication technology (ICT) in the classroom. This discussion takes into consideration age, gender, prior exposure to technology, and teacher attitudes. Further consideration is given to institutional support, technical support, available professional development, and access to both hardware and software. The conclusion is that there are numerous levels of support that are required to make technology support and training available to educators.

      RATING: 7/10

    1. Prezi is a productivity platform that allows for creation, organization, collaboration of presentations. It can be used with either mobile or desktop. Prezi integrates with slack and salesforce. RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Holographic computing made possible

      Microsoft hololens is designed to enable a new dimension of future productivity with the introduction of this self-contained holographic tools. The tool allows for engagement in holograms in the world around you.

      Learning environments will gain ground with the implementation of this future tool in the learning program and models.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Online Options Give Adults Access, but Outcomes Lag

      In this article, drivers that increase and improve online learning success in adults are explored. State by state data along with federal stats contribute to the conclusions presented.

      Roughly 13% of all undergraduates are full-time online students and between 2012 and 2017 online students grew y 11 percent, about 2.25 million. The article presents a map showing state by state stats and the information provided can assist in growing individual school needs.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Study: Most Teaching and Learning Uses Technology Nowadays

      This article reviews the impact of technology in the classroom. Today over 73% of teachers stated students are using tablets or laptops in the classroom. According to David Nagel, technology not only dominates education but also make students more productive and stimulates them intellectually.

      There is a link on the site to the complete study.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Learning Needs Analysis of Collaborative E-Classes in Semi-Formal Settings: The REVIT Example.

      This article explores the importance of analysis of instructional design which seems to be often downplayed particularly in distance learning. ADDIE, REVIT have been considered when evaluating whether the training was meaningful or not and from that a central report was extracted and may prove useful in the development of similar e-learning situations for adult learning.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. This website, Campus Technology, is an excellent source for integrating technology and teaching. The annotated section is on learning spaces designed to maximize student and teacher time. This site includes articles, tutorials, research, case studies, and more.

      10/10

  7. Aug 2018
    1. to learn how to better understand students like Cory and how to use that understanding to both connect with the student in the classroom as well as how to better address behavioral issues, and to also learn how to better control my emotions as a teacher so that I can both address situations with a clear mind, as well as go home

      希望在课堂中能很好的理解学生,更好的控制好学生行为,并且也控制好自己的情绪

  8. Mar 2018
  9. Feb 2018
    1. They now stand out as the only one in the class (or, if they’re lucky, one of two) who gets to use a device while other students wonder just why they get to use one. I have seen a couple of students on social media say that as soon as they see a “no devices” policy on a syllabus they drop the class because of this concern.

      Good rationale for not enacting a blanket classroom tech ban

  10. Mar 2017
    1. I was in the room with him from my learning space in Clermont Ferrand. I could hear the bad acoustics of the room in which he was/we were?. We were sharing the slides on the screen in Krakow inside the slide share of our hangout on air.

      Social presence.

      Hybridization.

      Room, space. confusion

    1. just because I "free" someone, doesn't mean that he/she will know what to do next, nor how to do it effectively

      Good point. What's the way to bring students to use technology effectively?

  11. Feb 2017
  12. Jul 2016
    1. Right now the focus is on audio data, which is being used in two ways. First, the system signals the TA when he or she is talking too much. That shows up as a big red screen that flashes to the instructor to give a warning, or a green light to signal that all is well.

      Does it apply the “10-second rule”, @slamteacher? Or does it trigger warnings at rhetorical questions?

    1. None of us, students and faculty included, have really figured out how to live, learn, and work in the emerging digital media-cognitive ecology. So it is certainly true that we can struggle to accomplish various purposes with technologies pulling us in different directions

      What could educators do to better prepare students to interact with digital media that leverages tech to go far beyond what paper and pen affords (tools, skills, etc.)?

  13. Jun 2016
    1. p. 71

      Gheen and Midgely 1999 examined "how teachers' reports of social comparison practices related to avoiding novelty and chellenge. They found that teachers' reports of informative social comparison practices related to slightly higher levels of avoidance. However, these practices weakened the association between self-efficacy and avoiding novelty and challenge. In classrooms where teachers were high in their use of interstudent discussion about how to improve one's own work, low- and high-efficacy students were on a more equal footing when it came to avoiding novelty challenge. However, in classrooms where teachers reported using high levels of relative ability social comparison practices, low self-efficacy students' avoidance was higher than that of high self-efficacy students'"

    2. pp. 70-71

      • Gheen and Midgley 1999 looked at classroom practices of sharing information about student work:
      • Where work was shared to "see who got the right answer" (relative ability purposes) and
      • to "get hints for when you have difficulty" (acquiring information purposes"

      No surprise:

      "They found that students' perceptions of the goal structure related to avoidance of novelty and challenge. When students perceived that their classrooms emphasized mastery goals, they reported lower levels of avoidance, but when they perceived their classrooms emphasized performance goals, they were more lilely to say that thei preferred to avoid novel and challenging work."

    3. p.70

      "Students' perceptions of a mastery classroom goal structure were associated with a lower level of help avoidance whereas their perceptions of a performance classroom goal structure were associated with a higher level of help avoidance. In classrooms where students perceived that the focus was on understanding, mastery, and the intrinsic value of learning, compared to classrooms where the focus was on competition and proving one's ability, students were less likely to avoid seeking help with their work when they needed it."

    4. p. 69

      "In the learning environments of classrooms and schools, students are exposed to and perceive various messages about the purposes of achievment. For example, students can perceive that in their classroom or school, there is an emphasis on learning, understanding, and improvment (a mastery goal structure). Similarly, they can perceive messages that suggest that getting the highest grades on the test and outperforming their classmates are valued most in the classroom or school (a performance goal structure). Sometimes, these perceptions are influenced by teacher practices that emphasize a mastery or performance goal structure, such as when teachers post only the work of the highest achieving students in the class (performance-goal-oriented instructional practices)."

  14. May 2016
  15. Apr 2016
  16. Jan 2016
  17. Nov 2015
  18. Sep 2015
    1. Este estudio presenta una síntesis de los temas abordados y las conclusiones de unos 20 meta-análisis y estudios sistemáticos, para ofrecer una perspectiva basada en evidencias sobre las prácticas conocidas como Blended Learning - una combinación de enseñanza cara a cara y contextos educativos basados en la web y mediados por la tecnología. Los estudios que investigan el BL han evolucionado, desde la práctica más básica, hasta convertirse en un campo de investigación maduro. Esto es bien evidente en las definiciones cambiantes, el aumento del número de tesis doctorales y la ampliación de las conversaciones que tienen lugar actualmente en la investigación primaria. Esta transformación del campo del BL ha sido impulsada por los rápidos avances en la tecnología, que ha facilitado la instrucción en línea que refleja las propiedades de los contextos cara a cara, lo que permite la rápida convergencia de estas modalidades de enseñanza.
  19. Aug 2015
    1. Flexibility

      Some connection with SAMR, unbundling, “open learning”… With diverse learners whose constraints may affect institutions, there’s a fair bit of talk about new(ish) tech-infused approaches to distance education. As with many other things, not much of it is new. But there might be some enabling phenomena. Not sure how gamification fits, here. Sure, open play could allow for a lot of flexibility. But gamification is pretty much the reverse: game mechanics without the open-ended playfulness.

  20. Jun 2015