5 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2018
    1. The idea that our students must have innate technological skills because they’ve grown up in a computer-saturated world is equal, to my mind, with assuming all drivers must be excellent mechanics or auto designers because they’ve spent so much time behind the wheel or, perhaps more germanely, to assuming all students must be innately gifted writers because they’ve grown up around books and paper.

      A valid point, however I think students that have grown up with lots of interaction with digital platforms are more likely to easily integrate digital humanities into their lives. For me, taking notes on my laptop is much more efficient than handwriting notes. I attribute this to my high school's use of iPads for notetaking and textbook access. I became skilled in taking notes digitally and still being able to absorb the information. In contrast, my mother could never take digital notes and feel as though she was absorbing the information. This is because she has not had the practice and training to do so because she grew up handwriting notes.

  2. Oct 2015
    1. Arriving in the Domodedovo Airport or Red Square or other public spaces, the suicide bomber takes advantage of the hospitable infrastructures of networked life. But this “black widow” perished due to this same structure of hospitality. This bombing is particularly instructive given this book’s discussion of hospitality and software. The bomber’s payload was detonated by a spam message from a cell phone provider. That text message, arriving on her phone through a hospitable network, arrived because she had connected herself to that network and, therefore, had welcomed the message.

      What a perfect example. The dynamics of networked relation entail a mutual exposure.

  3. Oct 2013
    1. That mere boys should sit mixed with young men, I do not approve; for though such a man as ought to preside over their studies and conduct may keep even the eldest of his pupils under control, yet the more tender ought to be separate from the more mature, and they should all be kept free, not merely from the guilt of licentiousness, but even from the suspicion of it
    1. SOME TIME is also to be devoted to the actor, but only so far as the future orator requires the art of delivery, for I do not wish the boy whom I educate for this pursuit either to be broken to the shrillness of a woman's voice or to repeat the tremulous tones of an old man's. 2. Neither let him imitate the vices of the drunkard nor adapt himself to the baseness of the slave; nor let him learn to display the feelings of love, or avarice, or fear: acquirements which are not at all necessary to the orator and which corrupt the mind, especially while it is yet tender and uninformed in early youth, for frequent imitation settles into habit.

      Is a parent supposed to limit a child's exposure to the world?

    1. Would not he seem to be affected with something like madness? There would be no eloquence in the world if we were to speak only with one person at a time.