191 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Sep 2020
    1. (unless some necessity should arise for making it public) is for the information of the family only

      Interesting potential foreshadowing here. Earlier the narrator spoke about how this was meant to be addressed to his family to explain his side of a dispute between him and his cousin, something that I totally get wanting to keep in the family. So what does it mean that we're reading it? Is it implying we're on a level of intimacy of the family, that the narrator isn't being truthful about his discretion, or that something bad happened that necessitates it being public that we'll find out about?

  3. Aug 2020
  4. Jul 2020
  5. Jun 2020
  6. May 2020
    1. Ghinai, I., Woods, S., Ritger, K. A., McPherson, T. D., Black, S. R., Sparrow, L., Fricchione, M. J., Kerins, J. L., Pacilli, M., Ruestow, P. S., Arwady, M. A., Beavers, S. F., Payne, D. C., Kirking, H. L., & Layden, J. E. (2020). Community Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 at Two Family Gatherings—Chicago, Illinois, February–March 2020. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 69(15), 446–450. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6915e1

    1. Yong, S. E. F., Anderson, D. E., Wei, W. E., Pang, J., Chia, W. N., Tan, C. W., Teoh, Y. L., Rajendram, P., Toh, M. P. H. S., Poh, C., Koh, V. T. J., Lum, J., Suhaimi, N.-A. M., Chia, P. Y., Chen, M. I.-C., Vasoo, S., Ong, B., Leo, Y. S., Wang, L., & Lee, V. J. M. (2020). Connecting clusters of COVID-19: An epidemiological and serological investigation. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, S1473309920302735. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30273-5

    1. Zhu, Y., Bloxham, C. J., Hulme, K. D., Sinclair, J. E., Tong, Z. W. M., Steele, L. E., Noye, E. C., Lu, J., Chew, K. Y., Pickering, J., Gilks, C., Bowen, A. C., & Short, K. R. (2020). Children are unlikely to have been the primary source of household SARS-CoV-2 infections [Preprint]. Epidemiology. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.03.26.20044826

  7. Apr 2020
  8. Mar 2020
    1. Choosing between family and work is a difficult decision. At Osano, it won't be one you have to make. From flexible work schedules to leadership who understand that family comes first, you'll never have to choose.
  9. Feb 2020
    1. They are constantly reminding me that “family first” is our mantra, and give me ease of mind to take time away when needed.
    1. Family and friends first, work second Long lasting relationships are the rocks of life and come before work. As someone said in our #thanks channel, after helping a family member for 5 days after a hurricane: "THANK YOU to GitLab for providing a culture where "family first" is truly meant".
  10. Jan 2020
    1. no difference

      The nature of the wants that commodities satisfy makes no difference. This is perhaps somewhat surprising to readers, given the extent to which everyday critiques of capitalist society often center around the role that consumerism plays and the subjective effects that this produces, namely, the way that consumer society creates all sorts of desires (as well as the obverse--many will defend capitalism on the grounds that it is able to satisfy our inordinate appetite for novelty by producing an enormous proliferation of desirable commodities). Yet, for Marx, the nature of these desires "makes no difference."

      It is worth pointing out that the critique of the appetites that consumer society spawns is by no means new (a rather early moment in the history of consumer society). We find it already on display in Book II of Plato's Republic. In looking to shift the terrain of the analysis of justice from the individualistic, social contractualist theory of justice elaborated by Glaucon, Socrates founds a 'city' based on the idea that no one is self-sufficient, that human beings have much need of one another, and that the various crafts--farming, weaving cloth, etc.--fare best when each person specializes in that craft to which they are most suited by nature. After sketching out a kind of idyllic, pastoral community based on the principle of working together to satisfy our natural appetites, Socrates aristocratic companion Glaucon objects, describing this city as a 'city fit for pigs'. At this point, Socrates conjures what he calls the 'luxurious city', at which point a whole host of social ills are unleashed in order to satisfy Glaucon's desire for the luxuries to which he is accustomed. Currency and trade are introduced, along with a more complex division of labor (and wage labor!), and quite quickly, war. On the basis of the principle of 'one person, one craft', Socrates argues that making war is itself a craft that requires specialization (and thus a professional army).

      For Plato, this represents the beginning of class society, as the profession military becomes a class distinct from the class of producers and merchants.

      Plato thus anticipates a version of a view that becomes one of the key theses of the Marxist theory of the state, namely, the idea that the state exists only in societies that have become "entangled in an insoluble contradiction within itself" and which are "cleft into irreconcilable antagonisms which it is powerless to dispel," (Engels, The Origin of the Family, Private Property, and the State). The state emerges as "a power apparently standing above society...whose purpose is to moderate the conflict and keep it within the bounds of 'order'" Engels writes, "this power arising out of society, but placing itself above it, and increasingly separating itself from it, is the state." Lenin cites this passage in the first pages of State and Revolution in order to critique the 'bourgeois' view that the state exists in order to reconcile class interests. In Lenin's reading of Marx, the state exists as "an organ of classs domination, an organ of oppression of one class by another," a view articulated in The Communist Manifesto, (cf. V.I. Lenin, State and Revolution in V.I.Lenin: Collected Works, Vol. 25, pp. 385-497).

      Marx cites this same passage from Republic in a long footnote to his discussion of the Division of Labor and Manufacture on pp. 487-488, which also happens to be the sole place in Capital where Marx cites Plato.

      The fact that Marx here expresses indifference to the particular appetites that commodities satisfy is thus intriguing and ambiguous. Given that this question both clearly animates Plato's discussion of the origin of class society in Republic and, additionally serves as an alternative to the social contractarian view of justice that descends from Glaucon through Hobbes and the 18th century 'Robinsonades', this seemingly technical point also touches upon questions concerning Marx's engagement with both classical and modern political theory.

      If for Plato, the unruly appetites represent the seed of which class-divided society is the fruit, Marx's dismissal of the question of the nature of the appetites that are satisfied by commodities points to exchange-value and the social forms that it unleashes as being key dimensions of the particular form that class-antagonism takes in capitalist society.

  11. Dec 2019
    1. status epilepticus
    2. Hyponatremia
    3. Cerebellar atrophy
    4. Myoclonic jerks
    5. Ataxia
    6. Hypotonia
    7. Progressive microcephaly
    8. Developmental regression
    9. Developmental delay
    10. Myoclonic jerks
    11. encephalopathy
    12. Hyponatremia
    13. Cerebellar atrophy
    14. Progressive microcephaly
    15. Developmental regression
    16. Developmental delay
    1. This circumstance, added to his well known integrity and dauntless courage, made me very desirous to engage him. A youth passed in solitude, my best years spent under your gentle and feminine fosterage, has so refined the groundwork of my character, that I cannot overcome an intense distaste to the usual brutality exercised on board ship: I have never believed it to be necessary; and when I heard of a mariner equally noted for his kindliness of heart, and the respect and obedience paid to him by his crew, I felt myself peculiarly fortunate in being able to secure his services. I heard of him first in rather a romantic manner, from a lady who owes to him the happiness of her life. This, briefly, is his story.

      In this addition to the 1831 edition, Walton turns the focus of this passage about the ship’s master onto himself and how his older sister fostered him somewhat like a mother and helped build his character. Where 1818 says little about Mrs. Saville’s character, Walton now likens her to Elizabeth, who will also act as a mother figure to Victor Frankenstein after his own mother’s death. The 1831 edition more strongly accentuates the domestic world throughout the new version.

    2. Elizabeth

      In this change to the 1831 edition, "Elizabeth" appears instead of "niece." Elizabeth had been the father's brother's daughter (or Victor's actual cousin) in the 1818 edition, but this is no longer true in 1831.

    3. a variety of circumstances had prevented his marrying early, nor was it until the decline of life that he became a husband and the father of a family.

      These changes to the 1831 edition make clear that Victor's father's late marriage is a result of factors beyond his control rather than carelessness or indifference, and further accentuate his familial position as the figurehead of their "domestic circle."

    1. In this description of our domestic circle I include Henry Clerval

      Like Elizabeth, Henry is made part of the family and shares what Mary Shelley often call its "domestic affections" that Victor's later actions imperil.

    2. the inv1_045fant Elizabeth, the only child of his deceased siste

      As Victor's cousin, Elizabeth will also play other family roles as "sister," substitute "mother," and finally "wife." In 1831 Mary Shelley changed Elizabeth's role into that of a foundling, unrelated to Victor by blood. Some modern critics believe this 1831 change avoids the possibility of incest in the 1818 novel and makes the later novel more conservative in implication. For the first arguments of this kind, see Ellen Moers, "Female Gothic: The Monster's Mother," The New York Review of Books, 21, no. 4 (March 21, 1974) and "Female Gothic: Monsters, Goblins, and Freaks," The New York Review of Books, 21, no. 5 (April 4, 1974).

    3. To Mrs. Saville, England.

      Robert Walton's letters to his sister, Mrs. Saville, suggest he, like Victor later in the novel, has ambitious aims that will conflict with his family members' sense of well being. She never appears as a character in the novel, however.

    4. Elizabeth, my love, you must supply my place to your younger cousins

      With Victor's mother's death, her wish for Elizabeth to assume her motherly role begins a series of symbolic family roles that Elizabeth will occupy: mother to the children, "my more than sister" to Victor, and eventually wife to Victor.

    5. I had committed deeds of mischief beyond description horrible

      Victor expresses guilt over his failure to make the existence of the creature known to the public, especially at the trial of Justine. In Volume 3, Chapter 5, Victor claims that it is well for "the unfortunate to be resigned," since "for the guilty there is no peace."

    6. domestic affection

      The maintenance of "domestic affection" is one of the most important virtues for Mary Shelley, one that is repeatedly violated by Victor Frankenstein's disregard of family responsibility, including the care of his own creation, the Creature.

    7. Romulus

      Romulus (c. 750 BC) was believed to have founded the city of Rome, its institutions, government, military and religious traditions. He reigned for many years as its first king. He is thought to have killed his twin brother, Remus.

    8. my mother sickened

      The death of Victor's mother, caused by her catching Elizabeth's scarlet fever, would lead in Victor's mind to a morbid association between the two women. It appears more vividly in Victor's nightmare in Volume 1, Chapter 4, associated there with his first horror at beholding his creature.

    9. her features appeared to change, and I thought that I held the corpse of my dead mother in my arms

      Victor's intensely morbid association of Elizabeth with his dead mother, prefigured by his mother's death from scarlet fever in Chapter 1 of Book 1, associates his act of creating the Creature (whom he has just witnessed for the first time) with this disturbing disruption of the "domestic affections."

    10. when they were unhappy, I felt depressed; when they rejoiced, I sympathized in their joys

      The eighteenth century British discourse of "sympathy" is especially vivid in the Creature's instinctive opening onto the emotions of others, echoing. as James Chandler shows, Adam Smith's arguments in The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759). ADD CITE

    1. and they suffered that evil in a very distressing degree.They had appeared to me rich, because their possessions incomparably transcended mine, but I soon learnt, that many of these advantages were only p apparent, since their delicate frame made them subject to a thousand wants of the existence of which I was entirely ignorant.

      In the Thomas Copy, Shelley replaces the Creature's perception that the De Lacey family is extremely poor with a more subtle observation. He had not perceived their suffering earlier because they had seemed "rich" by contrast to his own poverty, suggesting that knowledge of others is always dependent on our own viewing position.

    1. Sanditon was a second wife and four children to him, hardly less dear, and certainly more engrossing.

      Women and property are characterized similarly as acquisitions. Men in this time often marry and make choices for money, so this relationship seems quite transactional. Additionally, the idea that Sanditon is what consumes his time, rather than his family, contributes to the gender role of fathers as "working men" rather than "family men".

    2. The Heywoods were a thoroughly respectable family and every possible attention was paid, in the kindest and most unpretending manner

      The Heywood's are respectable because they assist other families in need; the Parker's need medical attention and comfort, and they give this to them without question.

    3. And here come my girls to speak for themselves and their mother.”

      This is a continuation of Mr. Heywood's comment that he would answer for his daughters and wife. It's an interesting situation when he's giving them opportunity to speak for themselves; however it is doubtful that he thinks their answer will be any different from his. Additionally, the only dialogue we hear in this chapter comes from the fathers, which undermines the idea that their answers and opinions are considered.

  12. Oct 2019
  13. newclasses.nyu.edu newclasses.nyu.edu
    1. MrBoutwellwritesmefromFondduLac,thathehasdeterminedtoleavehisfamilytherewhilehegoeshimselftoLeechLaketoseetheIndiansthere,andtakecareofthepropertyhehasthere,andthenwillreturntoFduLtospendthewinter

      Boutwell is going to leave his family at Fond du Lac while he travels to Leech Lake

    1. erethewifeofamiasionaryoanmostthefenmalenowhereofthechurch,themothoraandthat;danghtono.onaexertanimportantinfluencewhereitwomlnbeimpossibloforthemissionaryhimselftolaborwithmuah

      According to Wheeler, missions needs more womyn because they can exert more domestic influence than men on the Natives

    2. theboom39mg:garnish:nre»withsomefemaleassistantEgg]tolaboras.dom1o££o{gig}Helploouéfami

      The Wheeler family has been at La Pointe for a year and a half and asks the Board for a female assistant

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    1. GodinhieProvidencehasagainbroughtmyoelf'afamilywithinashortdistanceofFeeon1&0!&thereasonofthisMovement,13,inshortth

      After war erupted at Pokegoma, the mission families decided to leave, some of whom wanted to go to La Pointe and others to Fond du Lac

    1. TheostensibleobjectofthevisitwastoleaveourtwoSonsinChristianfamiliestobeeducat

      Ayer wants to leave his sons with Christian families in the city (ie in "civilization")

    2. WeshouldthereforebeundertheneEcelesityoftravellingattheexpenseoftheBoard,unlessindi—viéueismightbenisposodtogiveussomethingforthispurp

      Hall wants to spend the whole winter in the NE states with his family at the expense of the Board

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  14. Sep 2019
    1. D.GreenetoJosephTow

      Mr. Greene seems to suggest that Mr. Town should abandon his post at the mission since he is gone from there so often anyway

    2. MrandMrsAyerMrSeymour&MissStevensstillcomposetheMissionfamil

      the mission family at Pokegoma

    3. Oneonwhomandencecuthimselfseverelysomeweekssince—andavebeensicmorethanusual

      help at Pokegama for the Ayer's family is low because of injury and sickness

    4. andmustbeforafewweeks—asourgroundforplantingisyetcoveredwithlogs&brush.

      the Ayer's family arrived at Pokegama (?) and is unsettled due to house and land setbacks

  15. Aug 2019
    1. Ihavebeenobligedtorenderilytotheneglectofimportantmissionarywor

      because his wife is often sick, Mr. Hall has to do some housework, which takes away from the importance of missionary work

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    1. reinthehabitofkeepingamistres

      Missionaries should not live alone because it will be assumed that they have taken a mistress - this is why most missionaries are actually Mission Families

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    1. Lumbar gibbus
    2. disproportionate stature
    3. disproportionate stature
    4. disproportionate stature
    5. platyspondyly
    6. platyspondyly
    7. platyspondyly
    8. Lumbar gibbus
    9. disproportionate stature
    10. platyspondyly
    1. IfaMissionfumiEyr————————______—+consistedofoneman&twofemales,itmightbedifficulttoeradicateff35—555—1537‘fn§“imvro§§1onthathokoayohastooWiveo

      a mission family with two women might look like a polygamous relationship to the Natives

    2. Itisdesirablethatthoroshouldbethreegersono.-~atalleventsthoroshoulibotwo.Afamilymightconsistofonemale&twofemales,thernvoroewoulihoweverbeprefrablo;two‘maiéo&onefemale.MuchasIhaveboonwonttodobroontetheideaof‘aMiasionarthothoeeIn;n.beilnawr—ried,Imustfranklyadmititsproprietyifamissionintoboloo—atodhe

      Boutwell's suggestions for a mission family at Leech Lake

    3. heexpenseofestablishing&supportingaMissionfamilyhere,lcouldsay,fromtheobservation&estimate'Ihavebeenabletomake,itwouldnotexceed3600,norwould-itprobablybelessthan$500.

      Mission Family costs at Leech Lake

    4. hatthereareindividualswhowouldbeun—willingtohavetheirchil.instructedatpresent,Ihavenodoubt.Iamnotwithouthopehowever,thatbykindness&ajudiciouscourseofconduct,theirprejudiceswouldsoongiveway

      Boutwell understands not all families want their children taught, but he believes that they will eventually

    5. erewelefttochooseweshouldpreferhrE.ec‘woarewellacquaintedwithhim,andknowthatourvieweonthesubjectofplinlivingandvarioussubjectsconnect-edwithmissionaryOperationsharmoniz

      Ayer expects Ely to close his Mission near Sandy Lake because not many Natives settle there and requests that Ely be sent to Yellow Lake because he has similar views to the Ayer Mission Family

    6. referdenyingour—selveotheuseofthemnodiminishourexpensesandhavemoretobestowupontheneedyIndiana

      the Mission Family decides not to spend money on clothing, tea, coffee, pies, cakes, butter, lard, or fancy dishes in order to give more to "the needy Indians"

    7. Thebilloftrans-portation&provisionsaregreatastheynecessarilymuetbeforafamilysofarintheinteri

      expensive for a Mission Family to live so deep in the region

    8. heIndiantitletothislandisextinct,havingbeencededtotheCadottefamilybytheIndia

      the Natives cede land (surrounding Lake Superior?) to Cadotte Family (Mission Family?) Hall and Boutwell think this means no more land needs to be asked of the Natives

    9. gurfamilya§mgresentconsistsofninepersons,includingourhe

      mission family at La Pointe has 9 people, including interpreter and people who work agriculture

    10. “isfiedwith.fewmonthsinthefamily.Lastspring,inordertomakeexperi-mentoftheconfidenceoftheIndiansinus,andtoexhibitmorefullybeforethem,theadvantagesofcivilizedoversavagelife,wetookintoourfamilytwochildr

      the Mission Family took two Native children into their care to show the Natives how civilized life is better than their savagery

    1. ucalluschildren.isarenotohildrn.bunman

      from here until the bottom of the next page, Boutwell repeats the speech the Chief gave to the tour about their war against the Sioux Main Points: the war is to avenge the death of men, women, and children killed by the Sioux

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  16. Jun 2019