219 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2021
    1. A lot of similarity to Caitlin Flanagan's article after the Oprah interview. Almost as if this was much the same, just shortened and the Oprah pieces fitted in. Still some excellent writing about the cultural changes of the people and their time.

    1. Will it also help accomplish another goal — communicating to my students that a classroom of learners is, in my mind, a sort of family?

      I like the broader idea of a classroom itself being a community.

      I do worry that without the appropriate follow up after the fact that this sort of statement, if put on as simple boilerplate, will eventually turn into the corporate message that companies put out about the office and the company being a tight knit family. It's easy to see what a lie this is when the corporation hits hard times and it's first reaction is to fire family members without any care or compassion.

    1. On the “lows” side, I’d say the worst thing was the impact of not being present enough for my family. I was working a full-time job and doing faastRuby on nights and weekends. Here I want to give a big shout out to my wife. She supported me through this and didn’t cut my head off in the process.
    1. Fexeel ba kër gi bañ ñàkk alkol.

      Veille à ce qu'il ne manque pas d'alcool à la maison.

      fexe+el (fexe) v. -- search/seek by all means.

      ba -- the (?).

      kër gi -- house; family.

      gi -- the (indicates nearness).

      bañ v. -- refuse, resist, refuse to; to hate; verb marking the negation in subordinate clauses.

      ñàkk v. / ñàkk bi -- vaccinate / vaccine (not sure exactly how this fits in the sentence if it's even the right translation -- perhaps it has to do with surgical alcohol rather than drinking alcohol).

      alkol ji -- (French) surgical alcohol. (I'm certain this is also used for the type of alcohol you drink -- but sangara is probably the most used term).

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsUjvAItysA

  2. Feb 2021
  3. Jan 2021
    1. He married Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon in 1923, and they had two daughters, Elizabeth and Margaret.

      Immediate family

  4. Dec 2020
  5. icla2020b.jonreeve.com icla2020b.jonreeve.com
    1. the Madam

      The switching between Mrs. Mooney and The Madam is interesting in this paragraph. Someone else pointed out before how Mrs. Mooney was defined by her relationship to the men in her life, and The Madam then is a name for her that grants her authority over herself and her boarding house, acting like a kind of imposing, powerful title. However, the story then switches between these two names for her, so what does that mean? She can't escape her past? Also, describing her children as being "the Madam's" adds a layer of interest there. What does it mean to be Mrs. Mooney's son vs. the Madam's son?

  6. Nov 2020
  7. Oct 2020
  8. Sep 2020
    1. (unless some necessity should arise for making it public) is for the information of the family only

      Interesting potential foreshadowing here. Earlier the narrator spoke about how this was meant to be addressed to his family to explain his side of a dispute between him and his cousin, something that I totally get wanting to keep in the family. So what does it mean that we're reading it? Is it implying we're on a level of intimacy of the family, that the narrator isn't being truthful about his discretion, or that something bad happened that necessitates it being public that we'll find out about?

  9. Aug 2020
  10. Jul 2020
  11. Jun 2020
  12. May 2020
    1. Ghinai, I., Woods, S., Ritger, K. A., McPherson, T. D., Black, S. R., Sparrow, L., Fricchione, M. J., Kerins, J. L., Pacilli, M., Ruestow, P. S., Arwady, M. A., Beavers, S. F., Payne, D. C., Kirking, H. L., & Layden, J. E. (2020). Community Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 at Two Family Gatherings—Chicago, Illinois, February–March 2020. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 69(15), 446–450. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6915e1

    1. Yong, S. E. F., Anderson, D. E., Wei, W. E., Pang, J., Chia, W. N., Tan, C. W., Teoh, Y. L., Rajendram, P., Toh, M. P. H. S., Poh, C., Koh, V. T. J., Lum, J., Suhaimi, N.-A. M., Chia, P. Y., Chen, M. I.-C., Vasoo, S., Ong, B., Leo, Y. S., Wang, L., & Lee, V. J. M. (2020). Connecting clusters of COVID-19: An epidemiological and serological investigation. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, S1473309920302735. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30273-5

    1. Zhu, Y., Bloxham, C. J., Hulme, K. D., Sinclair, J. E., Tong, Z. W. M., Steele, L. E., Noye, E. C., Lu, J., Chew, K. Y., Pickering, J., Gilks, C., Bowen, A. C., & Short, K. R. (2020). Children are unlikely to have been the primary source of household SARS-CoV-2 infections [Preprint]. Epidemiology. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.03.26.20044826

  13. Apr 2020
  14. Mar 2020
    1. Choosing between family and work is a difficult decision. At Osano, it won't be one you have to make. From flexible work schedules to leadership who understand that family comes first, you'll never have to choose.
  15. Feb 2020
    1. They are constantly reminding me that “family first” is our mantra, and give me ease of mind to take time away when needed.
    1. Family and friends first, work second Long lasting relationships are the rocks of life and come before work. As someone said in our #thanks channel, after helping a family member for 5 days after a hurricane: "THANK YOU to GitLab for providing a culture where "family first" is truly meant".
  16. Jan 2020
    1. no difference

      The nature of the wants that commodities satisfy makes no difference. This is perhaps somewhat surprising to readers, given the extent to which everyday critiques of capitalist society often center around the role that consumerism plays and the subjective effects that this produces, namely, the way that consumer society creates all sorts of desires (as well as the obverse--many will defend capitalism on the grounds that it is able to satisfy our inordinate appetite for novelty by producing an enormous proliferation of desirable commodities). Yet, for Marx, the nature of these desires "makes no difference."

      It is worth pointing out that the critique of the appetites that consumer society spawns is by no means new (a rather early moment in the history of consumer society). We find it already on display in Book II of Plato's Republic. In looking to shift the terrain of the analysis of justice from the individualistic, social contractualist theory of justice elaborated by Glaucon, Socrates founds a 'city' based on the idea that no one is self-sufficient, that human beings have much need of one another, and that the various crafts--farming, weaving cloth, etc.--fare best when each person specializes in that craft to which they are most suited by nature. After sketching out a kind of idyllic, pastoral community based on the principle of working together to satisfy our natural appetites, Socrates aristocratic companion Glaucon objects, describing this city as a 'city fit for pigs'. At this point, Socrates conjures what he calls the 'luxurious city', at which point a whole host of social ills are unleashed in order to satisfy Glaucon's desire for the luxuries to which he is accustomed. Currency and trade are introduced, along with a more complex division of labor (and wage labor!), and quite quickly, war. On the basis of the principle of 'one person, one craft', Socrates argues that making war is itself a craft that requires specialization (and thus a professional army).

      For Plato, this represents the beginning of class society, as the profession military becomes a class distinct from the class of producers and merchants.

      Plato thus anticipates a version of a view that becomes one of the key theses of the Marxist theory of the state, namely, the idea that the state exists only in societies that have become "entangled in an insoluble contradiction within itself" and which are "cleft into irreconcilable antagonisms which it is powerless to dispel," (Engels, The Origin of the Family, Private Property, and the State). The state emerges as "a power apparently standing above society...whose purpose is to moderate the conflict and keep it within the bounds of 'order'" Engels writes, "this power arising out of society, but placing itself above it, and increasingly separating itself from it, is the state." Lenin cites this passage in the first pages of State and Revolution in order to critique the 'bourgeois' view that the state exists in order to reconcile class interests. In Lenin's reading of Marx, the state exists as "an organ of classs domination, an organ of oppression of one class by another," a view articulated in The Communist Manifesto, (cf. V.I. Lenin, State and Revolution in V.I.Lenin: Collected Works, Vol. 25, pp. 385-497).

      Marx cites this same passage from Republic in a long footnote to his discussion of the Division of Labor and Manufacture on pp. 487-488, which also happens to be the sole place in Capital where Marx cites Plato.

      The fact that Marx here expresses indifference to the particular appetites that commodities satisfy is thus intriguing and ambiguous. Given that this question both clearly animates Plato's discussion of the origin of class society in Republic and, additionally serves as an alternative to the social contractarian view of justice that descends from Glaucon through Hobbes and the 18th century 'Robinsonades', this seemingly technical point also touches upon questions concerning Marx's engagement with both classical and modern political theory.

      If for Plato, the unruly appetites represent the seed of which class-divided society is the fruit, Marx's dismissal of the question of the nature of the appetites that are satisfied by commodities points to exchange-value and the social forms that it unleashes as being key dimensions of the particular form that class-antagonism takes in capitalist society.

  17. Dec 2019
    1. status epilepticus
    2. Hyponatremia
    3. Cerebellar atrophy
    4. Myoclonic jerks
    5. Ataxia
    6. Hypotonia
    7. Progressive microcephaly
    8. Developmental regression
    9. Developmental delay
    10. Myoclonic jerks
    11. encephalopathy