7 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2018
    1. As noted by Zerubavel, “[t]ime is definitely one of the principles that can best allow us to establish and organ-ise priority in our lives as well as to symbolically display it” [59, p. 53].

      Design implication: Heuristic of control for user

  2. May 2017
    1. rebranding PBGS Ewohimi.

      CRO: Link each section to a CTA so user can take action. Heuristic: 'Consistency & Standards' - Headline to match same hierarchy and logical order.

    2. Good Afternoon!   We are Alumni of Pilgrim Baptist Grammar School, Ewohimi

      'Match between system and the real world' - Description should contain more information that should appear in natural and logical order.

    3. We connect, inspire and Impact Alumni members of Pilgrim Baptist Grammar School, Ewohimi.

      'Match between system and the real world' - Recommend including main headline followed by a description that introduces USP / mission statement.

  3. Nov 2016
    1. heuristic

      Not sure if this is a heuristic or a checklist. I think of heuristic as something like George Polya described in this book, How to Solve It. I would love to have more of these kinds of rules of thumb or better yet a path toward creating ones own custom rules of thumb.

  4. Oct 2015
    1. I have the feeling we do not need to use models as complicated as some outlined in the text; we can (and finally will have to) abstract from most of the issues we can imagine. I expect that "magic" (an undisclosed heuristic, perhaps in combination with machine learning) will deal with the issues, a black box that will be considered inherently flawed and practical enough at the same time. The results from experimental ethics can help form the heuristic while the necessity for easy implementation and maintainability will limit the applications significantly.

  5. Feb 2015
    1. Here are a few other commonly used heuristics, from George Pólya's 1945 book, How to Solve It:[2] If you are having difficulty understanding a problem, try drawing a picture. If you can't find a solution, try assuming that you have a solution and seeing what you can derive from that ("working backward"). If the problem is abstract, try examining a concrete example. Try solving a more general problem first (the "inventor's paradox": the more ambitious plan may have more chances of success).