3,630 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Is Muni, is the Sage, the true Recluse! He who to none and nowhere overbound By ties of flesh, takes evil things and good Neither desponding nor exulting, such Bears wisdom’s plainest mark!

      In this excerpt, Krishna is explaining yoga and mindfulness to Arjuna. He describes how the saint, or "Muni", stays awake when the world is asleep, and does not take interest in what the world lives for. "Muni" translates to "the silent one"; someone who can "control and silence their illogical thoughts". (Prasad). By practicing silence, munis are able to reach a higher level of consciousness and more spiritual holiness is achieved.

    1. Result of lots of searching on net is that pre-checkout hook in git is not implemented yet. The reason can be: There is no practical use. I do have a case It can be achieved by any other means. Please tell me how? Its too difficult to implement. I don't think this is a valid reason
    1. https://www.complexityexplorer.org/courses/162-foundations-applications-of-humanities-analytics/segments/15630

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwkRfN-7UWI


      Seven Principles of Data Feminism

      • Examine power
      • Challenge power
      • Rethink binaries and hierarchies
      • Elevate emotion an embodiment
      • Embrace pluralism
      • Consider context
      • Make labor visible

      Abolitionist movement

      There are some interesting analogies to be drawn between the abolitionist movement in the 1800s and modern day movements like abolition of police and racial justice, etc.


      Topic modeling - What would topic modeling look like for corpuses of commonplace books? Over time?


      wrt article: Soni, Sandeep, Lauren F. Klein, and Jacob Eisenstein. “Abolitionist Networks: Modeling Language Change in Nineteenth-Century Activist Newspapers.” Journal of Cultural Analytics 6, no. 1 (January 18, 2021). https://doi.org/10.22148/001c.18841. - Brings to mind the difference in power and invisible labor between literate societies and oral societies. It's easier to erase oral cultures with the overwhelm available to literate cultures because the former are harder to see.

      How to find unbiased datasets to study these?


      aspirational abolitionism driven by African Americans in the 1800s over and above (basic) abolitionism

  2. Jan 2023
    1. the lack of external input—of content to consume—is terrifying to people, to the extent that singular artifacts of media aren't sufficient. you need multiple inputs at once, to hedge against the possibility that one of them will fail to hold your attention and force you to sit in the quiet of your own mind.

      Overwhelming the senses, numbing thought -- antithetical to meditation, blocking thought rather than releasing it, detachment from reality and immersion in the created world, embracing overwhelm instead of deep experience

    1. This seems to have an interesting relation to the tradition of wassailers and "luck visitors" traditions or The Christmas Mummers (1858). The song We Wish You a Merry Christmas (Roud Folk Song Index #230 and #9681) from the English West Country (Cornwall) was popularized by Arthur Warrell (1883-1939) in 1935. It contains lyrics "We won't go until we get some" in relation to figgy pudding and seems very similar in form to Mari Lwyd songs used to gain access to people's homes and hospitality. An 1830's version of the song had a "cellar full of beer" within the lyrics.

      I'm curious if the Roud Folk Song Index includes any Welsh songs or translations that have similar links? Perhaps other folk song indices (Child Ballads?) may provide clues as well?

    1. contractual relations of individual and collectivity (in the formof written ship’s articles specifying shares of booty and ratesof compensation for on-the-job injury

      Pirate ships as forms of political organization and collective action!

    2. contemporary radical thinkersare more likely to see Enlightenment thought as the ultimate inreceived authority, as an intellectual movement whose mainachievement was to lay the foundations of a peculiarly modern formof rational individualism that became the basis of “scientific” racism,modern imperialism, exploitation, and genocide

      second and third order effects of the Enlightenment movement...

    3. This anyway would explain the apparent paradox of theBetsimisaraka: supposedly created by a failed philosopher king but,in fact, remaining as a stubbornly egalitarian people to this day,notorious, in fact, for their refusal to accept the authority of overlordsof any sort.

      The modern day culture of the Betsimisaraka which displays both egalitarian and stubborn people who refuse the authority of any overlords is some of the evidence that their culture through pirate stories into Europe were the beginnings of the Enlightenment.

    4. first stirrings of Enlightenment political thought

      David Graeber argues that the Betsimisaraka Confederation of Madagascar represents the first stirrings of Enlightenment political thought which influenced political philosophers who fueled revolutionary regimes a century later.

    5. But the blanketcondemnation of Enlightenment thought is in its own way rather odd,when one considers that this was perhaps the first historically knownintellectual movement organized largely by women, outside of officialinstitutions like universities, with the express aim of undermining allexisting structures of authority.
    6. Enlightenment thinkers were often quiteexplicit that the sources of their ideas lay outside what we now call“the Western tradition” entirely
    7. the Enlightenment project, one now seen inrevolutionary quarters as a false dream of liberation that has insteadunleashed unspeakable cruelty upon the world

      Was the Enlightenment a false dream of liberation which has really unleashed an unspeakable cruelty upon the world?

    1. Hall, opposite the chamber where stands the hearth. In this room they entertain the winners in the Olympic games.

      Description of layout.

    2. In the building is an altar to all the gods in common. Now return back again to the Altis opposite the Leonidaeum.

      description of the layout

    3. In this room they entertain the winners in the Olympic games.

      Where the winners of the Olympic games would go possibly for the banquet on the final day of the games.

    1. Re"...what is it like? How does it manifest?"For me, the idea that my zettelkasten becomes an entity outside myself is most often (and most obviously) felt in two situations (tho there are probably others):When I'm importing new ideas and a connection arises that I hadn't thought of previouslyWhen following trains of thought and connections arise that I didn't overtly intend to makeIn the first instance, I come across ideas I had forgotten about, and although it's not the direction I assumed the new idea would go, it becomes an exciting and possibly more lucrative way to take it.In the second instance, where I might be tracing a thought line to develop an article, I might, for example, zoom in on the graph view in Obsidian and see an idea that, while not formally connected to the ones I'm following, happens to be in close proximity spatially, and so it triggers a new direction I might want to take the article. (You can see this happen IRL in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OUn2-h6oVc&)In both cases, my zk feels like it's offering me more than what I would have gotten had I not been communicating with it. There is a sense that I and it are working together. I import new ideas with a rough sense of how they should connect. It shows alternatives to my thinking on the matter.Obviously, in both cases, all the ideas are my own. So, the zk is not necessarily developing ideas for me. But, because of the way in which the ideas are handled—non-hierarchically, rhizomatic, cross-categorical, cross-theme, etc.—non-habituated connections come to light, connections that are less conditioned by my own conventional ways of thinking.

      A good description from Bob Doto.

    1. Motoo Kimura, author of the book, The Neutral Theory of Molecular Evolution, published in 1983, more than a hundred years after Darwin's masterpiece.

      !- Title : The Neutral Theory of Molecular Evolution, published in 1983 !- Author : Motoo Kimura

    1. what do I say to these young activists that I train around the world when they come to me and they say are you okay with putting the the CEO of 00:42:38 one of the largest oil companies in the world in as the president of the cop is that really okay well it's not whether he's a nice guy or not or whether he's intelligent 00:42:51 the appearance of a conflict of interest undermines confidence at a time when climate activists around the world and I'm partly speaking for them right here on this stage have come to the conclusion that the people in Authority 00:43:04 are not doing their job there's a lot of blah blah blah as Greta says there are a lot of words and there are some meaningful commitments but we are still failing badly we need to have a super 00:43:17 majority process instead of unanimity in the cop we cannot let the oil companies and gas companies and petrol States tell us what is permissible in the last cop we were not allowed to even discuss 00:43:30 scaling down oil and gas can't discuss it a lot of the ndcs weren't even called for are we going to be able to discuss face scaling down oil and gas in the next cop

      !- COP28 President : is head of UAE ‘s largest oil company - putting the Fox in charge of the hen house

    2. we're taking colossal risks with the future of civilization on Earth We're degrading life support system that we all depend on we're actually pushing 00:00:57 the entire Earth system to a point of destabilization pushing Earth outside of the state that has support civilization since we left the last ice age 10 000 years ago this requires a transformation to safe 00:01:11 and just Earth system boundaries for the whole world economy

      !- Title : Leading the charge through earth’s new normal !- speakers : Johan Rockstrom et al.

    1. Since Rails creates callbacks for dependent associations, always call before_destroy callbacks that perform validation with prepend: true.
    1. 个人学习可能取决于他人行为的主张突出了将学习环境视为一个涉及多个互动参与者的系统的重要性
    1. Finally, a culture that rewards big personal accomplishments over smaller social ones threatens to create a cohort of narcissists

    2. Just as the wealthiest 1 percent of Americans gobble up a disproportionate share of the nation’s economic resources and rejigger our institutions to funnel them benefits and power, so too do our educational 1 percent suck up a disproportionate share of academic

      opportunities, and threaten to reconfigure academic culture so that it both mimics and serves their values

    1. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt11534762/

      The Good Fight S4 E5 "The Gang Goes to War"

      This episode features Diane chatting with a co-star about her note taking experience. The woman indicates that she took notes incessantly and voraciously, but that she never referred back to them. The experience just caused her extreme stress so she gave it up completely as she felt it never gave her any benefit. She resorted instead to a more zen practice of drawing circles in her notebooks. She showed Diane a pile of notebooks filled with circles in various designs and colors. Later in the episode while in court the woman asked Diane about it and Diane showed her some of her new circle "note" pages.

      [Watched the episode passively sometime in the past two weeks.]

    1. The Compass of Zettelkasten Thinking.

      The Brain in some of its views (see for eg: Jerry Michalski's default brain view) instantiates this sort of directional semantics for ideas.

      Note too, that The Brain makes it much easier to help create connections between multiple ideas as a basic functionality.

    1. “She is likely our earliest Black female ethnographic filmmaker,” says Strain, who also teaches documentary history at Wesleyan University.

      Link to Robert J. Flaherty

      Where does she sit with respect to Robert J. Flaherty and Nanook of the North (1922)? Would she have been aware of his work through Boaz? How is her perspective potentially highly more authentic for such a project given her context?

    1. ‘Running on Emptiness – The Pathology of Civilisation’John Zerzan (2002) All religions have problems with ‘unbelievers’, but that response is insignificant compared to their visceral hatred of ‘apostates’.

      !- Book Review : Free Range Activist !- Title : ‘Running on Emptiness – The Pathology of Civilisation’ !- Author : John Zerzan (2002) !- Website : http://www.fraw.org.uk/blog/reviews/023/index.shtml

      • All religions have problems with ‘unbelievers’, but that response is insignificant compared to their visceral hatred of ‘apostates’.
    1. Note 9/8j says - "There is a note in the Zettelkasten that contains the argument that refutes the claims on every other note. But this note disappears as soon as one opens the Zettelkasten. I.e. it appropriates a different number, changes position (or: disguises itself) and is then not to be found. A joker." Is he talking about some hypothetical note? What did he mean by disappearing? Can someone please shed some light on what he really meant?

      On the Jokerzettel

      9/8j Im Zettelkasten ist ein Zettel, der das Argument enthält, das die Behauptungen auf allen anderen Zetteln widerlegt.

      Aber dieser Zettel verschwindet, sobald man den Zettelkasten aufzieht.

      D.h. er nimmt eine andere Nummer an, verstellt sich und ist dann nicht zu finden.

      Ein Joker.

      —Niklas Luhmann, ZK II: Zettel 9/8j

      Translation:

      9/8j In the slip box is a slip containing the argument that refutes the claims on all the other slips. But this slip disappears as soon as you open the slip box. That is, he assumes a different number, disguises himself and then cannot be found. A joker.

      Many have asked about the meaning of this jokerzettel over the past several years. Here's my slightly extended interpretation, based on my own practice with thousands of cards, about what Luhmann meant:

      Imagine you've spent your life making and collecting notes and ideas and placing them lovingly on index cards. You've made tens of thousands and they're a major part of your daily workflow and support your life's work. They define you and how you think. You agree with Friedrich Nietzsche's concession to Heinrich Köselitz that “You are right — our writing tools take part in the forming of our thoughts.” Your time is alive with McLuhan's idea that "The medium is the message." or in which his friend John Culkin said, "We shape our tools and thereafter they shape us."

      Eventually you're going to worry about accidentally throwing your cards away, people stealing or copying them, fires (oh! the fires), floods, or other natural disasters. You don't have the ability to do digital back ups yet. You ask yourself, can I truly trust my spouse not to destroy them?,What about accidents like dropping them all over the floor and needing to reorganize them or worse, the ghost in the machine should rear its head?

      You'll fear the worst, but the worst only grows logarithmically in proportion to your collection.

      Eventually you pass on opportunities elsewhere because you're worried about moving your ever-growing collection. What if the war should obliterate your work? Maybe you should take them into the war with you, because you can't bear to be apart?

      If you grow up at a time when Schrodinger's cat is in the zeitgeist, you're definitely going to have nightmares that what's written on your cards could horrifyingly change every time you look at them. Worse, knowing about the Heisenberg Uncertainly Principle, you're deathly afraid that there might be cards, like electrons, which are always changing position in ways you'll never be able to know or predict.

      As a systems theorist, you view your own note taking system as a input/output machine. Then you see Claude Shannon's "useless machine" (based on an idea of Marvin Minsky) whose only function is to switch itself off. You become horrified with the idea that the knowledge machine you've painstakingly built and have documented the ways it acts as an independent thought partner may somehow become self-aware and shut itself off!?!

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNa9v8Z7Rac

      And worst of all, on top of all this, all your hard work, effort, and untold hours of sweat creating thousands of cards will be wiped away by a potential unknowable single bit of information on a lone, malicious card and your only recourse is suicide, the unfortunate victim of dataism.

      Of course, if you somehow manage to overcome the hurdle of suicidal thoughts, and your collection keeps growing without bound, then you're sure to die in a torrential whirlwind avalanche of information and cards, literally done in by information overload.

      But, not wishing to admit any of this, much less all of this, you imagine a simple trickster, a joker, something silly. You write it down on yet another card and you file it away into the box, linked only to the card in front of it, the end of a short line of cards with nothing following it, because what could follow it? Put it out of your mind and hope your fears disappear away with it, lost in your box like the jokerzettel you imagined. You do this with a self-assured confidence that this way of making sense of the world works well for you, and you settle back into the methodical work of reading and writing, intent on making your next thousands of cards.

    1. https://press.princeton.edu/series/ancient-wisdom-for-modern-readers

      This appears like Princeton University Press is publishing sections of someone's commonplace books as stand alone issues per heading where each chapter has a one or more selections (in the original language with new translations).

      This almost feels like a version of The Great Books of the Western World watered down for a modern audience?

    1. Kropotkin’s actual argument is far more interesting. Much of it, for instance, is concerned with how animal cooperation often has nothing to do with survival or reproduction, but is a form of pleasure in itself. “To take flight in flocks merely for pleasure is quite common among all sorts of birds,” he writes. Kropotkin multiplies examples of social play: pairs of vultures wheeling about for their own entertainment, hares so keen to box with other species that they occasionally (and unwisely) approach foxes, flocks of birds performing military-style maneuvers, bands of squirrels coming together for wrestling and similar games

      Perhaps play helps to provide social lubrication, communication, and bonding between animals which may help in creating cooperation which improves survival or reproduction?

    2. Spencer, in turn, was struck by how much the forces driving natural selection in On the Origin of Species jibed with his own laissez-faire economic theories. Competition over resources, rational calculation of advantage, and the gradual extinction of the weak were taken to be the prime directives of the universe.
    1. High Country News, Rebecca Nagle reported that for every dollar the U.S. government spent on eradicating Native languages in past centuries, it has spent less than 7 cents on revitalizing them in the 21st century. 

      !- United States indigenous language : ststistic - US Govt spent less than 7 cents for every dolloar spent eradicating indigenous language in the past - Citation : report by Rebecca Nagle in the High Country News: https://www.hcn.org/issues/51.21-22/indigenous-affairs-the-u-s-has-spent-more-money-erasing-native-languages-than-saving-them

    1. too much focus on the ‘indie’ (building complicated self-hosted everything-machines) and not enough on the ‘web’
    1. Index card carrying case

      Try Kaitiaki or Rite in the Rain. If you search for "index card wallet" you'll likely find a variety of others, including some custom made versions on sites like Etsy. 3 x 5" are relatively common, but 4 x 6" are much harder to come by.

    1. ExxonMobil, the world’s biggest oil company, knew as early as 1981 of climate change – seven years before it became a public issue, according to a newly discovered email from one of the firm’s own scientists. Despite this the firm spent millions over the next 27 years to promote climate denial.

      Exxon knew as early as 1981 of climate change

    1. The oil giant Exxon privately “predicted global warming correctly and skilfully” only to then spend decades publicly rubbishing such science in order to protect its core business, new research has found.

      Exxon Knew

    1. The Massachusetts high court on Tuesday ruled that the US’s largest oil company, ExxonMobil, must face a trial over accusations that it lied about the climate crisis and covered up the fossil fuel industry’s role in worsening environmental devastation.

      Exxon must face trial for climate crimes, Exxon Knew

    1. The deep AnthropoceneA revolution in archaeology has exposed the extraordinary extent of human influence over our planet’s past and its future

      !- Title : The deep Anthropocene - A revolution in archaeology has exposed the extraordinary extent of human influence over our planet’s past and its future !- Author : Lucas Stephens - researcher at archaeoGLOBE project

    1. Nice try, but it's still full of exceptions. To make the above jingle accurate, it'd need to be something like: I before e, except after c Or when sounded as 'a' as in 'neighbor' and 'weigh' Unless the 'c' is part of a 'sh' sound as in 'glacier' Or it appears in comparatives and superlatives like 'fancier' And also except when the vowels are sounded as 'e' as in 'seize' Or 'i' as in 'height' Or also in '-ing' inflections ending in '-e' as in 'cueing' Or in compound words as in 'albeit' Or occasionally in technical words with strong etymological links to their parent languages as in 'cuneiform' Or in other numerous and random exceptions such as 'science', 'forfeit', and 'weird'.
    1. not the technology itself that will bring about the learning or solve pedagogic prob-lems in the language classroom, but rather the affordances of those technologies andtheir use and integration in a well-formulated curriculum
    2. eachers’ digital litera-cies and their preparedness and motivation to introduce technology in their teachingwill largely impact on the extent to which technology-mediated TBLT will be viable asan innovation (Hubbard 2008)
    3. The addition of new technologies to people’s lives is never neutral, as it affects them,their language, and their personal knowledge and relations (Crystal 2008; Jenkinset al. 2009; Walther 2012)
    4. “digital natives”(Prensky 2001)

      A retenir pour usage ultérieur: digital native aka gen Z

    5. Warschauer has long warned, computerand information technology is no magic bullet and can be used to widen as much asto narrow social and educational gaps (Warschauer 2012
    6. particularly newInternet-connected devices and digital technologies have become embedded in thelife and learning processes of many new generations of students (Baron 2004; Ito et al.2009)

      saving this fact because it can be used as a reference in all our works later: so related to our field.

    1. The fate of Luetzerath embodies Germany's battle to ditch coal to meet its climate commitments and also keep the lights on following Russia's squeeze on gas supplies.

      Sky news on Luetzerath with strong picture

    1. Die Braunkohle unter dem Dorf Lützerath (Kreis Heinsberg) wird nicht benötigt, um die Energieversorgung in Deutschland sicherzustellen.

      Lützerath kohle nicht gebraucht

    1. Am 1. Dezember wurde im Bundestag der Deal des vorgezogenen Kohleausstiegs zwischen Robert Habeck, NRW-Ministerin Mona Neubaur und RWE-Chef Krebber angenommen(1).

      luetzerathlebt.info - aktuelle situation

    1. the tragedy of the Commons is not so much that it's Commons per se but that it's a cooperation problem that he described I 00:01:48 think very clearly that environmental degradation is often a social dilemma is often a cooperation problem and be it a commons or not the regulatory structure 00:02:02 or the the social structure can vary but cooperation problems are are important however of course he said his famous line this paper is you know solution is mutual coercion mutually agreed upon and and so that's 00:02:18 institutions right so the solution is institutions and of course we have other people who have said that very clearly and with a lot of wonderful evidence to back it up Elinor Ostrom being at the 00:02:31 top of that list and and her work on common pool resources and contains this fantastic list of sort of key design 00:02:44 elements that have emerged from studying small-scale common pool resource communities and and these are these are factors that tend to make those communities more successful in managing 00:02:56 those resources sustainably so so that's great

      !- mitigating : tragedy of the commons - Elinor Ostrom's design principles - It's often a cooperation problem - it is a social dilemma pitting individual vs collective interest

    1. there's a landlord tax the the  one percent in their day were the landlords you   have to tax away the land rent and make that  the public uh tax base not income not taxes on   consumer goods not taxes on capital because you  want good capital investment you want fortunes to   00:45:07 be made in a good way that add to the economy's  productivity you don't want them to be made in   a predatory bad way uh the whole fight to tax  economic rent and to even recognize that most   income is unearned when you talk about the uh  income disparity almost all this disparity is   unearned income it's economic rent it's not  income that's made by increasing uh production   00:45:33 it's not income that's made by increasing living  standards it's just predatory rent seeking from   special privileges that the wealthy have gained  from government and today it's not the landlord   class anymore as it was in the 19th century it's  the financial class and the raw materials class   uh and uh without dealing uh with this uh  cl structure i don't uh the system is going   00:45:57 to shrink and shrink and we've seen this before  we saw it in rome the same kind of polarization   and concentration of wealth in the roman empire  well the last stage of that is feudalism so we're   back to what rosa luxemburg said the choice is  between socialism and barbarism basically and uh   there's no other way to do it you can't  solve the problems within the existing system   00:46:23 because it's controlled already by the one  percent

      Micheal Hudson : tax the rent seeking class or face barbarism like in Rome - The situation today is degrading in the same way Rome degraded into feudalism - rent seeking class today is not the landlord class, but the financial and raw materials class that are making large fortunes from rent seeking - that is the system level reform necessary today

    2. i don't feel like we have any major  uh disagreement about you know everything you just   said michael uh let me say also regarding you know  my book capital in the 21st century you know it's   a book that has lots of limitations and and you  know i have on many issues you know i've tried to   00:26:31 to to to make progress since then so this  was written 10 years ago i wrote capital   and ideology much more recently which i  think addresses some of the shortcomings   but this is and still this book has also a  lot of limitations so you know i'm trying to   make progress all the time and i certainly  don't pretend that all the answers are in   you know one book and that being said i think you  know many many things that you've mentioned you   know again i fully agree with

      !- Thomas Piketty : Agreement with Michael and limitations of past books - Piketty states that every book has a lot of limitations. Capital and Ideology is his recent book and addresses some of the shortcomings of Capital in the 21st Century

    3. to get rid   of monopoly rent you have to return basic key  uh infrastructure to the public domain where   it was before 1980 so that uh basic needs can be  supplied at low prices not uh creating monopoly   for uh the one percent uh and i guess i'm saying  you have to realize that finance has used as well   00:25:12 to take over the economy and this has to  be reversed uh because uh once you have   uh wealth taking the form of uh claims uh  loans and claims on other people's debt   we'll count you up compound interest any rate of  interest is a doubling time and compound interest   is always going to grow faster than the economy's  real growth and the only way to prevent this isn't   00:25:37 simply to lower the interest rate which you've  done today 0.1 uh the only solution is to wipe out   the overall debts that are stopping economic  growth and these debts are the savings of the   one percent the good thing about cancelling debts  is you cancel the savings of the one percent   and as long as you leave these savings in  place there's not going to be a solution

      !- Michael Hudson : reverse privatization and wipe out debt - returning the public infrastructure sold off to companies after 1980 back to the public to get rid of monopolies who gouge the public - cancel all debt so that the savings of the 1% cannot continue compound growth trajectory

    1. Wir sind die Initiative „Lützerath Lebt“ und mittlerweile seit circa zwei Jahren in Lützerath aktiv. Unser Protest vor Ort entstand als RWE im Juni 2020 die Landstraße (L277) zwischen Lützerath und Keyenberg abgerissen hat.

      Was ist Lützerath lebt?

    1. Storytelling Will Save the EarthEmotional resonance, not cold statistics, will bring home the scale of the climate crisis—and the need for action.

      !- Title : Storytelling Will Save the Earth Emotional resonance, not cold statistics, will bring home the scale of the climate crisis—and the need for action. - See related story: Brian Eno – "We need the creative industry to help inspire climate action" https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.imperial.ac.uk%2Fnews%2F241832%2Fbrian-eno-we-need-creative-industry%2F&group=world

    1. We know the information. But information is not changing our minds. Most people make decisions on the basis of feelings, including the most important decisions in life – what football team you support, who you marry, which house you live in. That is how we make choices.”  “Thought is at the basis of our feelings, and before we have ideas we have feelings that lead to those ideas. So how do we change minds? A change in feelings changes minds.”

      !- "So how do we change minds? A change in feeling changes minds" : Comment - Brian Eno's comment is very well aligned with Deep Humanity praxis, which can be summed up as: The heart feels, the mind thinks, the body acts, an impact appears in our shared reality. - Also see the related story: - Storytelling will save the Earth: https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wired.com%2Fstory%2Fenvironment-climate-change-storytelling%2F&group=world

    1. it really all does 00:06:53 trace back to the start of our what we call civilization our civilization meaning Agriculture and then settlements and cities so prior to that we lived in approximate equilibrium with ecosystems

      !- Original source of : polycrisis - According to Prof. Tom Murphy, the original source of our current polycrisis is our collective, human need for control and mastery of our environment starting with civilization building itself, - and has its roots over 10,000 years ago in the beginnings of agriculture

      !- Tom Murphy : Comment His thesis is aligned with the work of: - Glenn Albrecht & Gavin Van Horn: Replacing the Anthropocene with the Symbiocene https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fhumansandnature.org%2Fexiting-the-anthropocene-and-entering-the-symbiocene%2F&group=world - Buddhist scholar David Loy: On the Emptiness at the heart of the human being that cannot be filled by consumerism & materialism https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2F1Gq4HhUIDDk%2F&group=world - Korean / German philosopher Byung-Chul Han: The Burnout Society https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2FbNkDeUApreo%2F&group=world - Cognitive Scientist, Buddhist scholar Jay Garfield: Losing the Self: https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2FE5lW5XedNGU%2F&group=world

    2. once we took 00:07:21 control of our food production a lot of things happen so suddenly we had Surplus we needed ways to store that Surplus we had settlements to stay close to our stores and the land that was producing our food we started 00:07:34 accumulating material possessions that led to hierarchies and systems to kind of preserve that status standing armies to protect those stores from 00:07:47 yourselves and other nearby populations it led to property rights this crazy idea that we can own the land and the property rights together with accumulation of material possessions led 00:08:02 to uh want a desire to continue that ownership into further generations and that led to patriarchy scheme which by the way got tied into our our religious 00:08:15 schemes and became monotheism so you have this great paternal um sort of overseer and then you know we had subjugation of humans and animals to do work for us led to all kinds of 00:08:27 ecological problems from Soul soil degradation habitat destruction um Extinction rates far above normal and all the rest all the things that we see today just sort of a connect the dot straight 00:08:40 from this idea of Agriculture so not now that we've kind of dialed up this rate of Destruction it's more obvious what the pattern is showing us which is that this initial impulse to control nature 00:08:54 was itself kind of a flawed um premise and consequential very consequential so since then we've actually been doubling down on that idea of control so that we keep trying 00:09:07 to control more and more but it's never going to be enough we're never going to be full Masters and so it's going to fail it's guaranteed to fail and unfortunately this system that we've constructed is so 00:09:21 huge that the failure is is almost by definition going to be spectacular and awful and lamentable because we just built it up so large

      !- collective control of nature : chain of events since agriculture - once we mastered stationary food production - we needed to settle down permanently, giving rise to the first settlements and built environment - surplus harvest needed storage so human settlements were built to stay close to the stores and land producing our food - we started acquiring material possessions, leading to armies to guard them, hierarchies and systems to preserve status - it led to the idea that we could own land and thus began the idea of property, wealth and material accumulation - ownership led to patriarchy, which was associated with religion - monotheism is the great paternal overseer - we had to subjugate humans and other flora and fauna species to serve us - this led to greater extinction and ecological problems

    1. the trip to korea is always a winter trip for me [music] [music] 00:13:16 if you are supposed to be on a subway platform, you immediately understand that you are in a tired society, you could say in a tired society in the final stage 00:13:30 the subways are supposed to be the same sleeping cars in which people decide whether they want to sleep after school everywhere and at different times in korea you can see people sleeping 00:13:44 people apparently people are fighting against permanent overtiredness very many people have long since succumbed to burnout and more than 100 die every year

      !- Title : The Burnout Society !- Author : Philosopher Byung-Chul Han - the price for freedom, the price for the pathological advocacy of "Yes, we can" is compulsion to achieve high goals, and failure and depression when it cannot be realistically achieve - the goal, as promoted is far too lofty and failure is all but assured

    1. DeWine said he has talked directly with the director and several members of the six-member Ohio Casino Control Commission, to which the legislature gave the job of regulating the fledgling industry.

      Since neither you nor I nor anyone else may dictate whether or not people bet on sports in Ohio, we couldn't have justly granted that authority to the legislature to hand off to the made-up "Ohio Casino Control Commission". We also couldn't have justly granted any authority to "Governor" Mike DeWine.

      This is simply corrupt racketeering by the most powerful gang in the state, and their "legions of enforcer" mercenaries to claim a right to impose their opinions on Ohioans when no one else can.

      For those confused, it's right there in the Just Powers clause of The Declaration of Independence.

      All just Gov power must be granted to it by individuals. They can't just wish power for themselves out of thin air, no matter how many legislators or voters "vote" for the wish to come true.

    1. The second tradition relating to the Sorek Valley tells of the Ark of theCovenant, which was kept in the Tabernacle at Shiloh in the Samaria Hillsand was sent with the Israelite army into battle against the Philistines.
    1. I've worked with and have helped maintain paranoia for a while. I'm convinced it does the wrong thing for most cases. Paranoia and acts_as_paranoid both attempt to emulate deletes by setting a column and adding a default scope on the model. This requires some ActiveRecord hackery, and leads to some surprising and awkward behaviour.
    1. the illusion of subject object duality 01:21:14 because the moment i think of myself as a self then i think that there's me a subject and then there's my objects there's the i and there's its visual field and they're totally different from one 01:21:26 another and that the basic structure of experience is there's me the subject who's always a subject and never an object and then all of those objects and i take that to be primordially given to 01:21:39 be the way experience just is instead of being a construction or superimposition so that's one illusion

      !- self illusion : creates illusion of duality - as soon as a self is imputed, that is metaphorically Wittgenstein's eye that stands in opposition to the visual field, the object - hence, existence of the imputed self imputes opposing objects

    2. now i want to talk about that serpent and really focus um firmly on what the 01:18:05 self illusion is this will be the last part of this little section that self is supposed to be something that stands outside of the world not something embedded in the world 01:18:17 it's the wittgenstein um the austrian philosopher of the first half of the 20th century um expressed this beautifully in his book the trektatus he said that the self stands to the world 01:18:30 like the eye stands to the visual field we don't see the eye but the fact that we have a visual field lets us know that there is an eye behind it but not in the field 01:18:42 the self he said is just like that we see a world we experience a world we act on a world and that tells us that there has to be a subject that stands outside of that world and experiences it just like the 01:18:56 eye stands outside of the visual field that's one of the worst things about the self-illusion is the illusion that we're not even in the world that we're totally transcendent to it that's really weird right i mean when you realize that 01:19:09 that's what you believe in your gut um that is it's like the eye and the visual field um that the self is continuous it doesn't stop as hume said talking about descartes 01:19:22 that it's always present to us that it's conscious it's the thing that's aware of everything else that it's free from causation that we can act freely on our motives without being caused so when you go to the 01:19:34 notary public to have a document notarized and she asks you those beautiful questions is this your free act and deed and if you said no i'm being caused to 01:19:46 do this she wouldn't notarize it would you so you say yes this is my free act indeed and i always just have my fingers crossed behind my back i don't believe in free acts and deeds but 01:19:59 we do take have this ideology about ourselves that we're with our free actions aren't cause we just do them as can't put it spontaneously that we are independent not 01:20:11 interdependent that when your mom tells you you've got to learn to stand on your own two feet that somehow that makes sense that ourselves can stand on our own two feet as independent objects 01:20:24 and mostly the self is what i am i am not my body my body is constantly changing my body was once young and fast now it's old and has a new knee um i'm 01:20:36 not my mind my mind was once sharp now it's dulled and beaten into submission by years of overwork but that i the jay who was once young is still here in this old man's body 01:20:49 so when we think about that self-illusion the self-illusion is partly bad because it's only a root illusion that leads to a whole cascade 01:21:01 of terrible illusions so now i want to really dump on the self-illusion by showing you just how dangerous it is

      !- Wittgenstein : Self-illusion - Wittgenstein also elucidated the power of the self-illusion - self is interpreted as something that stands outside of the world, not embedded in it - In his work "Tractacus Logico-Philosophicus", Wittgenstein used the metaphor of the eye that stands apart from the visual field to compare to the self concept - We have the compelling illusion that we as subject, like the eye, transcend the world - We perceive that this "self" is without cause, we are independent, not INTERDEPENDENT

    3. the important thing to point out is that when we think of the self this way the self isn't my body or my mind i don't take my body to be myself and 00:17:39 we're going to see that in a moment but i think of the self the target of this analysis the snake in the wall as the thing that has a body the thing that has a mind and of course if we were 00:17:50 operating in india and taking a doctrine of reincarnation or rebirth for granted we would think of it as the thing that in different lives appropriates different bodies and minds um and 00:18:02 but remains the same through those lives but if we're not in a kind of reincarnation and rebirth kind of mood um then we might think that it's just the thing that endures through our entire life while everything else 00:18:15 changes that is um the thing that was me when i was an itty-bitty baby when i was a young handsome guy when now that i'm an old guy um that it's there's something continuous there and we think of that as 00:18:28 the self

      !- different ways to think of : the self - the thing that has the mind or the body - the thing that endures through life while everything else changes, it was me as a baby, a child, a young man, an old man, etc.

    4. tells a great story says there's this guy um who is pretty sure he's got a snake in the wall of his house and in india um 00:14:13 that's still a problem and it was a much bigger problem back in the 7th century that snakes especially crates but also cobras would in order to get warm take up residence in the nooks and crannies of the stone wall of a house so this guy 00:14:26 is afraid that he's got a snake in the wall of his house and he's in order to dispel his own fear he walks around the house convincing himself that there's no elephant there and chandra charity says wouldn't this 00:14:40 guy be a public laughingstock who tries to assuage his fear of the snake by convincing himself that there's no elephant and what's the point of this weird story 00:14:52 you might ask well the moral of the story is this the snake is the self it's the self that you really do john vacardi thinks believe that you have and 00:15:05 the elephant is all of the things you might convince yourself that you don't have or that the self isn't um in order to really convince yourself that you're a really cool no self person so you might say hey i know my body's not a 00:15:18 self i've really got no self down pat or i know my mind isn't the self i've got myself myself i've got myself really on the right track here or all of these things and chandra kiriti thinks that a lot of the time when we think that we're refuting 00:15:32 the idea of a self we're actually refuting something else and so that the first important thing to do is to identify what that thing is that is the target of 00:15:43 our critical inquiry

      !- Explanation : Snake and Elephant story from Chandrakirti - the snake represents the self - and the elephant represents what we impute the self to be - All those things we refute (the elephant) are actually not the self at all:

    1. I've seen a bunch of people sharing this and repeating the conclusion: that the success is because the CEO loves books t/f you need passionate leaders and... while I think that's true, I don't think that's the conclusion to draw here. The winning strategy wasn't love, it was delegation and local, on the ground, knowledge.

      This win comes from a leader who acknowledges people in the stores know their communities and can see and react faster to sales trends in store... <br /> —Aram Zucker-Scharff (@Chronotope@indieweb.social) https://indieweb.social/@Chronotope/109597430733908319 Dec 29, 2022, 06:27 · Mastodon for Android

      Also heavily at play here in their decentralization of control is regression toward the mean (Galton, 1886) by spreading out buying decisions over a more diverse group which is more likely to reflect the buying population than one or two corporate buyers whose individual bad decisions can destroy a company.

      How is one to balance these sorts of decisions at the center of a company? What role do examples of tastemakers and creatives have in spaces like fashion for this? How about the control exerted by Steve Jobs at Apple in shaping the purchasing decisions of the users vis-a-vis auteur theory? (Or more broadly, how does one retain the idea of a central vision or voice with the creative or business inputs of dozens, hundreds, or thousands of others?)

      How can you balance the regression to the mean with potentially cutting edge internal ideas which may give the company a more competitive edge versus the mean?

    2. “There is no substitute for good decisions at the top—and no remedy for stupid ones.”
  3. Dec 2022
    1. It’s fairly clear now that the current catalog process is too heavyweight. I hope we can move to a lighter workflow in the future that feels more like editing a wiki.
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPuqBdPULx4

      Mostly this is a lot of yammering about what is to come and the trials and tribulations it's taken him to get set up for making the video tutorials. Just skip to the later videos in the series.

      He did mention that he would be giving a sort of "peep show" of his note taking method, though he didn't indicate whether or not we might be satisfied with it. This calls to mind Luhmann's quote about showing his own zettelkasten being like a pornfilm, but somehow people were left disappointed.

      cross reference: https://hyp.is/GFj15IcbEe21OIMwT2TOJA/niklas-luhmann-archiv.de/bestand/zettelkasten/zettel/ZK_2_NB_9-8-3_V

    1. 9/8,3 Geist im Kasten? Zuschauer kommen. Sie bekommen alles zusehen, und nichts als das – wie beimPornofilm. Und entsprechend ist dieEnttäuschung.

      https://niklas-luhmann-archiv.de/bestand/zettelkasten/zettel/ZK_2_NB_9-8-3_V

      I've read and referenced this several times, but never bothered to log it into my notes.

      Sasha Fast's translation:

      Ghost in the box? Spectators visit. They get to see everything, and nothing but that - like in a porn movie. And the disappointment is correspondingly high.

    1. When writing history, there are rules to be followed and evidence to be respected. But no two histories will be the same, whereas the essence of scientific experiments is that they can be endlessly replicated.

      A subtle difference here between the (hard) sciences and the humanities. Every human will bring to bear a differently nuanced perspective.

    2. Because I am as interested in the attitudes and assumptions which are implicit in the evidence as in those which were explicitly articulated at the time, I have got into the habit of reading against the grain. Whether it is a play or a sermon or a legal treatise, I read it not so much for what the author meant to say as for what the text incidentally or unintentionally reveals.

      Historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and surely other researchers must often "read against the grain" which historian Keith Thomas defines as reading a text, not so much for what the author was explicitly trying to directly communicate to the reader, but for the small tidbits that the author through the text "incidentally or unintentionally reveals."

    1. For those who can hear. When you name you divide. There is zero biblical precedent for naming a certain group of believers .... Identify with the body of Christ in your area .... We are exhorted to, "let there be no division among you".The only use of "churches" plural in scripture refers to the church in different locations. There was no such thought of "churches" within one locality. Love you all and pray more will see this so the world may see we are one and know that Jesus was sent by the Father.It's important John 17:20-23
    2. no need any name whatsoever bro It's who we are that's important.
    1. Time was good to the Go-Betweens: it vindicated them. They were not a popular group, but they were very much loved, and that was far more important. The gospel had spread. There were substantial inducements for the two songwriters to work together again – not least their faltering solo careers – and after they toured as a duo to promote a best-of release, there was a sense of inevitability that a second act was imminent, especially when both songwriters returned to live in Brisbane.

      Although 'time may have been good to them' in regards to their legacy and reputation, Robert Forster explains in his autobiography that they were still paying off the touring advance associated with 16 Lovers Lane for 25 years.

    2. HERE'S THE FIRST thing you should know about Grant McLennan: he wasn't a genius. Neither is his friend and songwriting partner Robert Forster, with whom he formed the Go-Betweens in late 1977. Rather, both were artisans of the first order: talented songwriters who worked diligently at their craft and believed completely in the value of what they were doing. Their aesthetics were finely tuned and they understood – first intuitively, then by experience – what it took to make great records.

      Maybe 'genius' is in the ability to keep going.

    1. Now picture Timothy, who lives with his grandchildren in Walande Island, a small dot of land off the east coast of South Malaita Island, part of the Solomon Islands. Since 2002, the 1,200 inhabitants of Walande have abandoned their homes and moved away from the island. Only one house remains: Timothy’s. When his former neighbors are asked about Timothy’s motives they shrug indifferently. “He’s stubborn,” one says. “He won’t listen to us,” says another. Every morning his four young grandchildren take the canoe to the mainland, where they go to school, while Timothy spends the day adding rocks to the wall around his house, trying to hold off the water for a bit longer. “If I move to the mainland, I can’t see anything through the trees. I won’t even see the water. I want to have this spot where I can look around me. Because I’m part of this place,” he says. His is a story that powerfully conveys the loneliness and loss that 1.1 degrees of anthropogenic warming is already causing. 

      !- example : storytelling to save the earth

    1. The sudden awareness of something that calls for an explanation, once the fog of habit has lifted, seems to be the real stuff revolutions’ sparkles are made of

      !- revolutionary learning comes from : questioning basic assumptions - the art of asking questions about the simplest things - is the art of recognizing complexity in the obvious - is the art of not just taking things for granted - is the art of articulating wonder at the way things are

    2. Noam Chomsky and Andrea Moro on the Limits of Our ComprehensionAn excerpt from Chomsky and Moro’s new book “The Secrets of Words.”

      !- book title : The Secrets of Words" - authors : Moro and Chomsky

    1. Commentators have compared Bachelard's views to those of the philosopher Martin Heidegger.

      Related to Heidegger

    2. The Poetics of Space (French: La Poétique de l'Espace) is a 1958 book about architecture by the French philosopher Gaston Bachelard

      what is The Poetics of Space

    1. In this case, if the constant Admin::User was already loaded at the time Admin::UserManager.all was called, then it would return Admin::User objects.However, if Admin::User was not yet auto-loaded, but User was, Admin::UserManager.all would instead return User objects!
    1. I think one of the the things that 00:00:27 really separates us from the high primates is that we're tool builders and I read a a study that measured the efficiency of locomotion for various species on the planet the Condor used 00:00:41 the least energy to move a kilometer and humans came in with a rather unimpressive showing about a third of the way down the list it was not not too proud of a showing for the crown of 00:00:53 creation so that didn't look so good but then somebody at Scientific American had the insight to test the efficiency of locomotion for a man on a bicycle and a man on a bicycle or human on a bicycle 00:01:07 blew the Condor away completely off the top of the charts and that's what a computer is to me what a computer is to me is it's the most remarkable tool that we've ever come up with and it's the 00:01:19 equivalent of a bicycle for our minds

      Cleaned up quote:

      I think one of the [the] things that really separates us from the high primates is that [uh] we're tool builders. And I read a [uh] study that measured the efficiency of locomotion for various species on the planet. The Condor used the least energy to move a kilometer and [uh] humans came in with a rather unimpressive showing about a third of the way down the list. It was not [not] too proud of a showing for the crown of creation. So [uh] that didn't look so good, but then somebody at Scientific American had the insight to test the efficiency of locomotion for a man on a bicycle. And a man on a bicycle or human on a bicycle blew the Condor away—completely off the top of the charts and that's what a computer is to me. [uh] What a computer is to me is: it's the most remarkable tool that we've ever come up with and it's the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds.<br /> —Steve Jobs in Memory & Imagination: New Pathways to the Library of Congress. Documentary. Krainin Productions, 1990.

      Snippet from full documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ob_GX50Za6c

    1. Simplify network topology by connecting only one end-device to the TP-Link device. DO NOT connect any other devices like modem or server because those may have an impact on the running of web-based management server of the TP-Link or your end-device.
    1. Seeking full energy independence from Russian gas, in response to Russia's energy blackmail in #Europe and the war in #Ukraine 🇺🇦, #Lithuania 🇱🇹 has completely abandoned Russian gas

      Lithuania abandons Russian Gas

    1. But then life went on and nothing really happened.

      https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/zl2hwh/is_the_concept_of_personal_knowledge_management/

      This essay seems to be more about shiny object syndrome. The writer doesn't seem to realize any problems they've created. Way too much digging into tools and processes. Note the switching and trying out dozens of applications. (Dear god, why??!!) Also looks like a lot of collecting digitally for no clear goal. As a result of this sort of process it appears that many of the usual affordances were completely blocked, unrealized, and thus useless.

      No clear goal in mind for anything other than a nebulous being "better".

      One goal was to "retain what I read", but nothing was actively used toward this stated goal. Notes can help a little, but one would need mnemonic methods and possibly spaced repetition neither of which was mentioned.

      A list of specific building blocks within the methods and expected outcomes would have helped this person (and likely others), but to my knowledge this doesn't exist as a thing yet though bits and pieces are obviously floating around.<br /> TK: building blocks of note taking

      Evidence here for what we'll call the "perfect system fallacy", an illness which often goes hand in hand with "shiny object syndrome".

      Too many systems bound together will create so much immediate complexity that there isn't any chance for future complexity or emergence as the proximal system is doomed to failure. One should instead strive for immediate and excessive simplicity which might then build with time, use, and practice into something more rich and complex. This idea seems to be either completely missed or lost in the online literature and especially the blogosphere and social media.


      people had come up with solutions Sadly, despite thousands of variations on some patterns, people don't seem to be able to settle on either "one solution" or their "own solution" and in trying to do everything all at once they become lost, set adrift, and lose focus on any particular thing they've got as their own goal.

      In this particular instance, "retaining what they read" was totally ignored. Worse, they didn't seem to ever review over their notes of what they read.


      I was pondering about different note types, fleeting, permanent, different organisational systems, hierarchical, non-hierarchical, you know the deal.

      Why worry about all the types of notes?! This is the problem with these multi-various definitions and types. They end up confusing people without giving them clear cut use cases and methods by which to use them. They get lost in definitional overload and aren't connecting the names with actual use cases and affordances.


      I often felt lost about what to takes notes on and what not to take notes on.

      Why? Most sources seem to have reasonable guidance on this. Make notes on things that interest you, things which surprise you.

      They seem to have gotten lost in all the other moving pieces. Perhaps advice on this should come first, again in the middle, and a third time at the end of these processes.

      I'm curious how deeply they read sources and which sources they read to come to these conclusions? Did they read a lot of one page blog posts with summarizations or did they read book length works by Ahrens, Forte, Allosso, Scheper, et al? Or did they read all of these and watch lots of crazy videos as well. Doing it "all" will likely lead into the shiny object syndrome as well.

      This seems to outline a list of specifically what not to do and how not to approach these systems and "popular" blog posts that are an inch deep and a mile wide rather than some which have more depth.

      Worst of all, I spent so much time taking notes and figuring out a personal knowledge management system that I neglected the things I actually wanted to learn about. And even though I kind of always knew this, I kept falling into the same trap.

      Definitely a symptom of shiny object syndrome!

    1. https://www.google.com/books/edition/India_Traders_of_the_Middle_Ages/WMj5aFA3bjQC?hl=en

      I've seen a few references to Goitein's "India book". This seems to be the referent, which somehow never seems to be called by title, even in contexts of academics who love citations. Is it shorthand? Was the book published posthumously? (2008, so yes)

      Wikipedia calls it out as such as well...

      India Traders of the Middle Ages: Documents From the Cairo Geniza (ISBN 9789004154728), 2008 (also known as "India Book")