44 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. The objects, which he describes as cylinders, are clay tubes about the size and shape of a little finger—like elongated beads. Because of their shape, and because they were found near pottery vessels inside the tomb, he suspects they might have served as tags that could be strung on the vessels to identify something about them, whether their contents, their owner, or their origin or destination. If that is the case, he speculates that the writing could denote names, or descriptions of property.

      These archaeological objects could theoretically have been one of the first written tags in human history.

    2. The generally accepted origin story of the alphabet as we know it holds that in 1800 BCE, Semitic speakers in Egypt, aware of the Egyptian writing system's mix of characters that stood for words and symbols that stood for sounds, wanted a system of their own and borrowed the Egyptians' alphabetic portion. Semitic languages are the predecessors of most of today's Middle Eastern languages.

      Generally accepted origin story of writing.

  2. Jun 2021
  3. May 2021
    1. I had always assumed – without realising the assumption – that the ancient knowledge keepers would have progressed around the henge posts or stones much as I do around a memory palace. It hadn’t occurred to me that there may be experts on each topic, ‘owning’ each post or stone and the knowledge it represented. Is there any way the archaeology could ever tell us if this is the case?

      Personally, I had assumed from Kelly's work that individual knowledge keepers may have done this. Particularly in the cases of the most advanced and protected knowledge based on the private spaces she discussed.

      The question about archaeology being able to tell us is a very good one. Nothing immediately comes to mind, but it's worthwhile to look at this. Could some artifacts indicate different artists through their own craft be a way of differentiation?

  4. Apr 2021
    1. In 2019, an unusually dry summer caused the waters of the Valdecañas Reservoir to recede, revealing a monument that has come to be referred to as the “Spanish Stonehenge.” NASA satellites captured images of the exposed stones known as the Dolmen of Guadalperal, which experts suspect may have been built sometime in the second or third millennium BCE.

      Might be worth looking this up to see how it might or might not relate to pre-Celtic migration patterns as they relate to other standing stones in the Celtic and Celtic fringe areas.

      Sad that the markings are wearing away in addition to making studying the area much more difficult.

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Wikipedia</span> in Waun Mawn - Wikipedia (<time class='dt-published'>04/02/2021 15:33:08</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Firstly, an entire tribe moving from Wales to the Salisbury Plain took their encyclopaedia with them. This would require the circle to be erected in the same order as in Wales and oriented in the same direction. In effect, these people were taking their database of knowledge with them, the structure in the stones, and the data in their memories. Secondly, a different tribe conquering those in Wales might identify just how effective this memory technique is and steal only the technology. Essentially, they stole the database structure and filled it with their own data. The bluestones are particularly suited to a mnemonic purpose due to the blotches and blobs in their material makeup.

      Perhaps there's a third possibility not mentioned here?

      Perhaps the group at Waun Mawn, traded a portion of their knowledge and database to a more powerful and potentially more central nearby group of people? The evidence indicates that many of the people buried at Stonehenge were originally from the area of Wales where some of the stones originated. The fact that some stones remained behind may mean that some of the needed local encyclopedia stayed behind.

    1. Equally, Waun Mawn did not become the core of a monument complexof the kind known around other great stone circles, such as the Ring of Brodgar, Aveburyand Stonehenge. Its development as a major centre in the earlier Neolithic (seeFigure 1)appears to have been curtailed by early dismantling. Although the region was probably notentirely evacuated—the four remaining stones at Waun Mawn possibly symbolise the iden-tities of those groups who remained local—it may have been extensively depopulated. Onlyfurther research into settlement and land-use employing other lines of evidence, such as paly-nology, will provide answers.

      Interesting to think that some of these stones may have stayed behind to represent the knowledge of the group that stayed behind. If the stones can be thought of as "books", some of the extra empty ones were relocated with the knowledge of other books moved into them in new contexts.

    2. The four surviving stones at Waun Mawn are of unspotted dolerite, and possibly derive fromoutcrops 3km to the south-east at Cerrigmarchogion on the Preseli ridge (Bevinset al.2014).
    3. As some of these samples could alsohave been either residual or intrusive, we propose that the stone circle was erected inc. 3600–3000 cal BC.This date would place Waun Mawn amongst the earliest stone circles in Britain, alongsideLong Meg and her Daughters in Cumbria (109m diameter) and the stone circle beneath thepassage tomb of Bryn Celli Ddu on Anglesey (18m diameter).

      Synopsis with dating of Waun Mawn stone circle.

    4. To resolve this, radiocarbon dating of these samples fromWaun Mawn was conducted in conjunction with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL)dating of sediment from within the packing deposits that were contemporaneous with themonoliths’erection, and fromfilled-in sockets (from after the monoliths’removal). OSL dat-ing determines the burial age of sediments, with the dating signals being reset by light expos-ure immediately prior to deposition (Smedley2018).

      Look up this process and evaluate the mechanism for how it works.

    5. geologist Herbert Thomas,who established that the spotted dolerite bluestones at Stonehenge originated in the PreseliHills of west Wales, where, he suspected, they had originally formed a“venerated stone-circle”(Thomas1923: 258).
  5. Mar 2021
  6. Feb 2021
    1. Foucault probably offers the most helpful theoretical approach. His “archaeology of knowledge” suggests a way to study texts as sites that bear the marks of epistemological activity, and it has the advantage of doing justice to the social dimension of thought.

  7. Jan 2021
    1. Strongly influenced by Darwin’s ideas about evolution, the British anthropologist Edward Tylor (1832–1917), and his American counterpart Lewis Henry Morgan (1818–1881), both published important works in the 1870s arguing that human societies had evolved from a state of savagery (primitive hunting) through barbarism (simple farming) to civilization (the highest form of society). Morgan’s book, Ancient Society (1877), was partly based on his great knowledge of living Native Americans.
    2. It was a French customs inspector, Jacques Boucher de Perthes (1788–1868), working in the gravel quarries of the Somme river, who in 1841 pub-lished convincing evidence for the association there of human artifacts (of chipped stone, what we would today call “hand-axes” or “bifaces”) and the bones of extinct animals
    3. In the same period, around 1675, the first archaeological excavation of the New World – a tunnel dug into Teotihuacan’s Pyramid of the Moon – was carried out by Carlos de Sigüenza y Góngora.
    4. The main thing to remember is that every view of the past is a product of its own time: ideas and theories are constantly evolving, and so are methods.

      This is also an important thing to remember when reading and evaluating older texts and discoveries.

    Tags

    Annotators

  8. Dec 2020
    1. It could be argued that the whole philosophy of archaeology is implied in the questions we ask and the form in which we frame them.
    2. Chairman Mao coined the slogan “Let the past serve the present,” but that was sometimes used as an excuse for the deliberate destruction of ancient things.
    3. surviving fragments of the Berlin Wall which once divided East from West Germany but which was opened and torn down in 1989.

      As a thought experiment, what sorts of evidence of a physical barrier like this would still exist for future scholars to study to surmise its existence a thousand years hence even if all physical remains of the wall were torn down and no written records exist?

  9. Oct 2020
    1. This painting was discovered in the Bulu Sipong cave on Sulawesi in 2016 and recent analysis has shown that it is the “oldest pictorial record of storytelling” and the “earliest figurative artwork in the world”, and is at least 43,900 years old. (The oldest known drawing in the world, a 73,000-year-old abstract scribble, was found in South Africa in 2018.)
  10. Feb 2020
    1. Reverse engineering a bronze cannon from theLaBelleshipwreck

      The benefit to archaeology, museum curation, and other areas presented by computer modeling and 3D printing cannot be overstated. These technologies allow us to explore artifacts, sites, and more, in ways that we never could before.

  11. Feb 2019
    1. slighted to clear access to the drove way

      Might mean slighting in the sense of straightforward demolition

  12. Aug 2018
    1. Open to Exploration

      Internet Archaeology is trialling a new feature by Hypothes.is which enables everyone to make annotations on journal content. To get started, just select any text in any article and add your annotation for everyone to see (Annotations are public by default but highlights are private, visible only to you when you’re logged in to your Hypothes.is account). You can even share your annotations on social media,

      Try this for more info https://web.hypothes.is/blog/varieties-of-hypothesis-annotations-and-their-uses/

      I'm interested to see how everyone uses it!

    1. Internet Archaeology is trialling a new feature by Hypothes.is which enables everyone to make annotations on journal content. To get started, just select any text in any article and add your annotation for everyone to see (Annotations are public by default but highlights are private, visible only to you when you’re logged in to your Hypothes.is account). You can even share your annotations on social media,

      Try this for more info https://web.hypothes.is/blog/varieties-of-hypothesis-annotations-and-their-uses/

      I'm interested to see how everyone uses it!

  13. Jan 2018
    1. The crayon, or perhaps more accurately “crayon-like object”, is 22-milimetres long and seven-millimetres wide, an elongated structure comprised primarily of haematitite, although with some small hard pieces of other minerals embedded.

      Haltman says "material objects begin in a world of objects but takes place in a world of words." Finding this crayon is congruent to this belief because this object opens a door to a new "world of words." Although primitive in language this crayon would begin a new "nuanced vocabulary" for early man.

  14. Nov 2017
  15. May 2016
    1. This website is a very comprehensive resource about medieval pottery in Italy. It is rather difficult to navigate properly since part of the original navigation was implemented with some scripting method that is now obsolete, but all pages should be reachable by means of normal href links. It was updated until circa 2004.

  16. Nov 2015
    1. The 74 pieces, acquired legally at the time by the former Spanish ambassador to Ecuador, were given to the Museo de América for restoration on the condition that they be returned when asked.
    1. Peru seeks repatriation of 400 cultural artifacts from New York

      Repatriation of artifacts currently residing in the Met. A common concern across countries currently seeking repatriation of cultural objects is their ability to display and care for the objects.

    1. A Historic Manuscript on Aztec Life Is “Virtually Repatriated

      Interesting ideas of repatriation through technology. Does this count as true repatriation? Does it achieve the same goals?

  17. Oct 2015
    1. <!-- jQuery(function() { // Increase Font Size jQuery('.increase-font-size').click(function(){ var currentFontSize = jQuery('#blox-story-text').find("p").css('font-size'); var currentFontSizeNum = parseFloat(currentFontSize, 10); var newFontSize = currentFontSizeNum*1.2; $('#blox-story-text').find("p").css('font-size', newFontSize); return false; }); // Decrease Font Size jQuery('.decrease-font-size').click(function(){ var currentFontSize = $('#blox-story-text').find("p").css('font-size'); var currentFontSizeNum = parseFloat(currentFontSize, 10); var newFontSize = currentFontSizeNum*0.8; jQuery('#blox-story-text').find("p").css('font-size', newFontSize); return false; }); // end doc ready }); //--> Home Local Downtown Waco Students to help unearth historic fountain of Waco’s Hispanic heritage

      Community archaeology! Excavation of a fountain from a Mexican-American neighborhood settled in the late 19th century.

  18. Sep 2015
    1. Ancient tunnels discovered underneath Mexican city of Puebla

      Construction often uncovers archaeological features in cities. Commercial archaeologists are often called into construction sites in order to excavate the material.

    1. How Peru is using drones to protect its archaeological treasures

      Interesting read on the usage of drones in mapping archaeological sites. The composite image is made by taking overlapping aerial photographs. From this, 3D models of the sites can be made. This article discusses not only the archaeological benefits of drone use, but also how drones can help to keep tabs on any destruction occurring on the site.

  19. Oct 2013