4 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2022
    1. In 1991, the earliest known roundel was found in Germany, also corresponding to the Stroked Pottery culture. Called the Goseck Circle, it is 246 feet (75 m) in diameter and had a double wooden palisade and three entrances. Because two of the entrances correspond with sunrise and sunset during the winter and summer solstices, one interpretation of the Goseck Circle is that it functioned as an observatory or calendar of sorts, according to a 2012 study in the journal Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association (opens in new tab).

      Sounds like this shares many of the potential features of Stonehenge, stone and timber circles, and menhirs that fit into Lynne Kelly's thesis on mnemonic devices.

  2. Nov 2021
    1. https://www.heritagedaily.com/2021/11/new-findings-on-jordanian-megaliths/141965

      New megaliths found in Jordan in various stages of construction which helped archaeologists suggest a method for their construction by carving the stones from the ground and then supporting them with smaller ones.

      Worth checking to see if standing stones may have been found at these sites as well.

  3. Sep 2021
  4. Apr 2021
    1. In 2019, an unusually dry summer caused the waters of the Valdecañas Reservoir to recede, revealing a monument that has come to be referred to as the “Spanish Stonehenge.” NASA satellites captured images of the exposed stones known as the Dolmen of Guadalperal, which experts suspect may have been built sometime in the second or third millennium BCE.

      Might be worth looking this up to see how it might or might not relate to pre-Celtic migration patterns as they relate to other standing stones in the Celtic and Celtic fringe areas.

      Sad that the markings are wearing away in addition to making studying the area much more difficult.