1447 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The aim is to demonstrate the distance travelled on their journey in the form of tangible, trackable learning outcomes and applications.

    1. Shout-out to the notion of "federated wikis" being developed by Ward Cunningham, who developed the first wiki, and Mike Caulfield and Tim Owens.

    2. Our vision around the phrase reclaim is at least in part inspired by the documented work that Boone Gorges and D'Arcy Norman have been doing to take back their online presence from third-party services since 2011. While their approach is far more drastic than what we are advocating, Project Reclaim represents an ethos that is diametrically opposed to the innovation outsourcing that is prevalent in higher education IT shops at the moment.

    3. Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft. These big five American vertically organized silos are re-making the world in their image.

    4. Rather than framing everything at the course level, we should be deploying these technologies for the individual.26

      Obvious question: what about groups, communities, networks, and other supra-individual entities apart from the course/cohort model?

    5. what Mike Caulfield refers to as a collection of "EDUPUNK technologies" evident in a variety of recent experimentations such as cMOOCs, ds106, FemTechNet, Open Course Frameworks, and P2PU.

    6. Educational technologists who thrive will do so by adroitly blending local culture with the global platforms.

    7. Thanks to the philosophical foundations of the Internet — open standards, collaborative design, layered architecture — its technologies typically qualify as user innovation toolkits

    8. "potentiality" (to graft a concept by Anton Chekov from a literary to a technical context). This is the idea that within the use of every technical tool there is more than just the consciousness of that tool, there is also the possibility to spark something beyond those predefined use

    9. Although we're currently nowhere near this idea, how can businesses, educational institutions, and governments alike not consider the importance of giving individuals control over their digital archives? Or their learning analytics data?17

    10. more than just a student's schoolwork; they should also include personal photos, videos, transcripts, X-rays, dental records, police records, and a million other digital life-bits.

    11. In the accompanying article "Innovation Reclaimed," we share some projects that are working toward the vision of educational institutions reclaiming innovative learning on the web.

      Speaking of “counting them”.

    12. The idea that we can collaboratively build a platform that will frame the discourse and promote sharing is a promising aftereffect of the current MOOC backlash.

      Since the term “disruptive” has come to be associated with Clay Christensen’s model, there might be something closer to a reappropriation model like Hippies appropriating VW Beetles, Roadsworth painting pedestrian crossings into zippers, or circuit benders making musical instruments out of old toys. Somewhere, someone may subvert a MOOC into something useful. In fact, Arshad Ahmad once described a successful MOOC which had lost its instructors. Learners started owning their learning activities.

    13. basic Web 2.0 premises of aggregation, openness, tagging, portability, reuse, multichannel distribution, syndication, and user-as-contributor

    14. the experimentation and possibility of the MOOC movement had become co-opted and rebranded by venture capitalists as a fully formed, disruptive solution to the broken model of higher education.11

    15. collaborative effort between a university professor and a government researcher (much like the collaborations at the beginnings of the Internet)

      Brief History of the Internet has been in my required readings for Sociology of Cyberspace.

    16. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), which have become the poster child of innovation in higher education over the last two to three years

    17. Do everything possible to minimize reliance on an enterprise LMS. Explore ways to support activity and content development in environments that foster collaboration and also interoperability with a wide range of tools. Before directing activity to a complex, locked-down system, ask: "Do we really need to do it this way? Is there a simpler, cheaper, open alternative that will do the job?"

    18. an environment unlike anything they will encounter outside of school

      Hm? Aren’t they likely to encounter Content Management Systems, Enterprise Resource Planning, Customer Relationship Management, Intranets, etc.? Granted, these aren’t precisely the same think as LMS. But there’s quite a bit of continuity between Drupal, Oracle, Moodle, Sharepoint, and Salesforce.

    19. support alternative systems, such as blogs and wikis

    20. ability to support small scale IT requests that don't require an enterprise level solution

      Resonates with what we hear from people who work at the Government of Canada.

    21. equip them with practical web skills

    22. Courses are severely limited in the ability to access other courses even within the institution (so much for "connecting silos"), and when courses end, students are typically cast out, unable to refer to past activity in their ongoing studies or in their lives (so much for "promoting lifelong learning").

      Which is where a different type of unbundling can happen. “Courses” may limit our thinking.

    23. social engagement, public knowledge, and the mission of promoting enlightenment and critical inquiry in society

    24. mandate the use of "learning management systems."

      Therein lies the rub. Mandated systems are a radically different thing from “systems which are available for use”. This quote from the aforelinked IHE piece is quite telling:

      “I want somebody to fight!” Crouch said. “These things are not cheap -- 300 grand or something like that? ... I want people to want it! When you’re trying to buy something, you want them to work at it!”

      In the end, it’s about “procurement”, which is quite different from “adoption” which is itself quite different from “appropriation”.

    25. "it's not about the technology" because "the technology is neutral."

      Right. Technology isn’t neutral. Nor is it good or bad. It’s diverse and it’s part of a broader context. Can get that some educators saying that it’s not about technology may have a skewed view of technology. But, on its own, this first part can also lead to an important point about our goals. It’s about something else. But, of course, there are some people who use the “bah, the technology doesn’t matter as long as we can do what we do” line to evade discussion. Might be a sign that the context isn’t right for deep discussion, maybe because educators have deeper fears.

    26. instances of broad, culture-shifting experimentation along these lines in higher education can be counted on one hand

      Let’s count them! And there’s something interesting about this contrast between experimentation and disruption. The latter may be about shifting profit centres. The former may be about learning.

    27. recent promise of Web 2.0

      A bit surprised by this “recent”. By that time, much of what has been lumped under the “Web 2.0” umbrella had already shifted a few times. In fact, the “Web 3.0” hype cycle was probably in the “Trough of Disillusionment” if not the Gartner-called “Slope of Enlightenment”.

    28. institutional demands for enterprise services such as e-mail, student information systems, and the branded website become mission-critical

      In context, these other dimensions of “online presence” in Higher Education take a special meaning. Reminds me of WPcampus. One might have thought that it was about using WordPress to enhance learning. While there are some presentations on leveraging WP as a kind of “Learning Management System”, much of it is about Higher Education as a sector for webwork (-development, -design, etc.).

    1. In our culture, talking about the future is sometimes a polite way of saying things about the present that would otherwise be rude or risky.

      For once, this lede isn’t buried.

    1. Innovation involves the acceptance of the goals of a culture but the rejection of the traditional and/or legitimate means of attaining those goals. For example, a member of the Mafia values wealth but employs alternative means of attaining his wealth; in this example, the Mafia member’s means would be deviant.

    1. “I want somebody to fight!” Crouch said. “These things are not cheap -- 300 grand or something like that? ... I want people to want it! When you’re trying to buy something, you want them to work at it! [Instructure] just didn’t.”

    2. two quarters of pilot courses on Instructure’s Canvas platform

    3. To the surprise of those behind the initiative, about two-thirds of faculty members said they were satisfied with the Blackboard system, deployed on campus in 1999.

  2. Nov 2017
    1. As with our democracy, we get the ed tech that we deserve.

    2. it is more emotionally satisfying to rail against the Powers That Be

    3. The selection committee declares that whatever LMS the university chooses next must work exactly like Blackboard and exactly like Moodle while having all the features of Canvas. Oh, and it must be "innovative" and "next-generation" too, because we're sick of LMSs that all look and work the same.

    4. the terrible, horrible, no-good university administrators are trying to build a panopticon in which they can oppress the faculty

    5. If you recall your LMS patent infringement history, then you'll remember that roles and permissions were exactly the thing that Blackboard sued D2L over.

    6. (At the time, Stephen Downes mocked me for thinking that this was an important aspect of LMS design to consider.)

      An interesting case where Stephen’s tone might have drowned a useful discussion. FWIW, flexible roles and permissions are among the key things in my own personal “spec list” for a tool to use with learners, but it’s rarely possible to have that flexibility without also getting a very messy administration. This is actually one of the reasons people like WordPress.

    7. “privileges” — that’s an important word, because it doesn’t simply imply what you can and cannot do with the software. It’s a nod to political power, social power as well.

    8. Do you know what the feature set was that had faculty from Albany to Anaheim falling to their knees, tears of joy streaming down their faces, and proclaiming with cracking, emotion-laden voices, "Finally, an LMS company that understands me!"?

      While this whole bit is over-the-top, à la @mfeldstein67, must admit that my initial reaction was close to that. For a very similar reason. Still haven’t had an opportunity to use Canvas with learners, but the overall workflow for this type of feature really does make a big difference. The openness aspect is very close to gravy. After all, there are ways to do a lot of work in the open without relying on any LMS. But the LMS does make a huge difference in terms of such features as quickly grading learners’ work.

    9. Canvas was a runaway hit from the start, but not because of its openness.

    10. Why, they would build an LMS. They did build an LMS. Blackboard started as a system designed by a professor and a TA at Cornell University. Desire2Learn (a.k.a. Brightspace) was designed by a student at the University of Waterloo. Moodle was the project of a graduate student at Curtin University in Australia. Sakai was built by a consortium of universities. WebCT was started at the University of British Columbia. ANGEL at Indiana University.

    11. Let's imagine a world in which universities, not vendors, designed and built our online learning environments.

    12. In an ideal world, every class would have its own unique mix of these capabilities based on what's appropriate for the students, teacher, and subject.

      How about systems with a different granularity from the class/course/cohort models?

    13. And that, in fact, is a pretty good description of the IMS standard in development called Caliper, which is why I am so interested in it. In my recent post about walled gardens from the series that Jonathan mentions in his own post, I tried to spell out how Caliper could enable either a better LMS, a better world without an LMS, or both simultaneously.

    14. the backbone of for a distributed network of personal learning environments

    15. Stephen Downes built gRSShopper ages ago

    16. Jim Groom's ds106 uses a WordPress-based aggregation system, the current generation of which was built by Alan Levine

    17. Jim Groom's ds106 uses a WordPress-based aggregation system

    18. The teacher should decide.

    19. the tools shouldn’t dictate the choice

    1. I will go to the bank by the wood and become undisguised and naked,I am mad for it to be in contact with me.

      via @mfeldstein67.

    1. Alan Levine’s comment also needs to be kept for posterity:

      I so appreciate the framing of this history for the oMOOC (Original) as "courses of lectures" which seems not focused on the lectures but the discussions generated. And thanks for the mention of the ds106 assignment bank (a concept I seem to suggest in every project) but I must make a small historical credit. Grant Potter was definitely part of the foundation, but his great contribution was DS106 Radio. The person who credit for the Assignment Bank must go to is Martha Burtis who did this and more for co-creating DS106, but she's often invisible in the Shadow of Groom. I did the archeology on the Assignment Bank history: http://cogdogblog.com/2016/10/ds106-history-details/ I dream that someone would fund you to roll out the model described, maybe it's a dMOOC (Downsian) not that it would likely overtake the xMOOC Hype Train (which all its is shiny conductors have jumped off the train, i just keeps rolling through burgs like EdSurge).

    2. access to one-on-one (and possible small circle) consultations for a fee

    3. association with a community that will continue to support its members and their work into the various professions

    4. track record of some relevant contributions to that field

    5. deep and current education in a topic

    6. We (had we ever been given the opportunity) would have created the business proposition very differently.

    7. access to the top researchers in the field

    8. I think that universities (especially the 'elite' universities) have lost the plot when it comes to their value proposition (or, at least, what they tell the world their value proposition is).

      In some ways, the strongest indictment of the MOOC hype.

    9. they commercialized and monetized the course (as opposed to the education) which meant that progressively less and less of the course experience was freely accessible.

    10. they depended mostly on pre-recorded videos for content (following the Khan Academy) model. This was content that was intended to be 'learned' by students.

    11. On this model, students are responsible for their own education, often forming communities or societies to collaborate. Professors typically worked one-on-one with students, but from time to time would be enlisted to offer a series - or 'course' - of lectures on a given topic. The lectures could be (and often were) public, and were frequently attended by other professors in the same field.

      Reminds me of @KevinCarey1 describe the original university of Bologna, in his End of College. Don’t have the quote handy (one of many cases where #OpenAccess would allow for more thoughtful discussion), but the gist of that paragraph sounds similar to what @Downes is describing here

    1. This includes investing heavily in regional campus-based programs at universities and colleges that are aimed at encouraging students to acquire business skills and launch their own companies.

      Speaking of “prescient”…

    2. If there’s one standout global trend pertaining to today’s young people, it is an embrace of entrepreneurship as both a career path and a way a life.

    1. DW: How does H5P allow users to create rich content in content management systems?

    2. The H5P format is open and the tools for creating H5P content are open source. This guarantees that creatives own their own content and are not locked into the fate and licensing regime of a specific tool. Read more about how H5P ensures that the content remains yours in our blog.

    1. privacy concerns

    2. JavaScript widgets create simple graphs to quickly and concisely display activity by exhibit and by student

      Wonder if these were custom-made or if they relate to other initiatives.

    3. The data is sent to a LearnShare LRS for storage.

      Was wondering which LRS they used.

    4. A simple search function allows teachers to search for specific text strings found in either the xAPI statements or in the text responses typed in by students.

    5. Wonder if @NinaKSimon and other people in the Museum 2.0 sphere have worked on this type of thing. A few years ago, there were several beacon projects in museums. But it’s my first encounter with a museum using xAPI.

    1. Text and graphics, multiple-choice and multiple-response, free-text entry, drag-and-drop, and other interactive techniques

      Sounds like H5P.

    2. seamless transition between working and learning.”

    3. if the children are from more than one class, the app is programmed with rules that determine which curriculum appears on the iPad.

    4. “In the museum’s situation, it’s completely untenable to hand out smartphones to hundreds of elementary students each day,”

    5. While the teacher can correlate individual responses with the children’s names, no one else—not the app, not the museum—has any personal information about the learners.

    6. creates a highly personalized experience for the children while simultaneously alleviating privacy concerns.

  3. www.torrancelearning.com www.torrancelearning.com
    1. xAPI and Next Generation Learning Get the right data about the learning experience and its impact on performance. We’re among the early adopters and leaders in the Experience API (xAPI) and its application in performance & analytics. As winners of the xAPI Hyperdrive, eLearning Guild Demofest and Brandon Hall Awards with our xAPI-based solutions, we’re inspiring others with fresh thinking. As hosts of the xAPI Learning Cohort we’re supporting hundreds of pioneers and experimenters in learning and working with the xAPI.

    1. One student in Canada decided to ask his university for the data they collected about his interactions with educational material

    2. it's important to consider what could happen if a student does ask for their data

    3. compare where their engagement levels stand against the rest of the class.

    4. self-regulating effect

    5. As higher education professionals, we would be remiss if we left out one of the most important potential benefactors of xAPI and learning analytics: students.

      Afterthought?

    1. xAPI is a json based data structure that's for expressing the actions taken by a user. It's popular for tracking activity across websites because of it having a standard base schema with flexibility for providing contextual information based on use-case.

    1. Any questionable or surprise patterns might deserve an extra look or perhaps a redesign in how that material is presented.

  4. courses.openulmus.org courses.openulmus.org
    1. it's adoption

    2. it's adoption

    3. Currently, Canvas and Sakai are the only LMSs reviewed which has somesupport for xAPI (emphasis on some). Blackboard, D2L, Sakai and Canvas all have support for IMS Caliper, a more edu specific format.

    1. A video for Domains 2017. All footage by the amazing Meredith Fierro. Contributions from Zach Whalen, Steve Greenlaw, Nora Forknall, Janine Davis, Mark Synder, Clark Billups, Lee Skallerup Bessette, Callie Liberty, Parrish Waters, Claudine Ferrell, Sierra, Andi Livi Smith, Elaina Finkelstein, Troy Paino, Kris Shaffer, Jenn Hill, Stephanie Buckler, and Audrey Watters.

      Recognized a few, but not everyone. Would need to watch Meredith Fierra’s full film (with lower thirds, one might assume). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9dGAAe-emY

    1. my own spirit would begin to feel unreclaimable.

      Reclaim ghosting?

    2. Professor  Parrish Watters

      Speaking of space, wondering about this one between “Parrish” and “Watters”.

    3. how could we take something seriously that had birthed lolcats? 

      Ask @BiellaColeman.

    4. If the Web were a concrete space, what would it look like?

    5. I’ve come to realize more and more that these analogies, metaphors, and symbols are the way that we can come to teach the Web so that our students know it in the sense of recognizing it — distinguishing it, perceiving it in relation to those things already known.

    6. We need to provide useful guidance. We need to point students in those directions where we think that they can be successful, by suggesting applications they should install and use, by offering ideas of what elements to include on their sites, by providing feedback as they explore their own digital presence, but after that we need to be able to step back and get out of the way.

      Part of the reason it can be so difficult to step back is that students really expect us not to do so.

    7. Finding Our Metaphors

      The visual metaphor is quite intriguing. For some weird reason, it reminds me of La Jetée.

    8. If we want Domain of One’s Own to flourish as a space for student agency than we need to balance structured guidance with playfulness and empowerment.

    9. We find that often we can learn more about the assignment that a student had been given than about the student herself.

      Sounds like ethnography!

    10. how to balance supporting a system as complex as Domain of One’s Own without dictating how people use it

    11. You could say I’ve been converted.

    12. I never have to be part of an HOA.

      Homeowner’s Association?

    13. I sought to shut down a startup culture at the school that was resulting in sites built with decidedly unregulated palettes and proportions.

    14. Reston Brown

      Wonder if it’s this one.

    15. much of my life can be described between these two concepts

    16. whether or not they fact-check the things they share or re-share on Facebook

    17. attention paid to the ways in which our students consume and digest information

    18. the algorithms of the Web are one of the least understood concepts that our students know nothing about

      “Pay no attention to that mind behind the algorithm”

    19. representation of race and gender in our culture

    20. having students do a basic Google image search for terms like “doctor” “teacher” “baby”

      It may sound obvious but it actually works. Just did it with each of these three words (on DuckDuckGo) and the results, though unsurprising, bring home the point. Tried switching on the Canadian filter, to check if their might be a difference, and it mostly reorders the results, for some reason. Also tried “student” and “musician” which provide an interesting contrast. Doing this exercise in class, would probably start by asking learners to write down what they expect to get. (Might even do it in my applied anthro class, tomorrow.)

    21. But if they are learning how to build on the Web they probably need to know something about becoming findable (or unfindable) on the Web. And by extension they need to understand how the power behind that findability is impacting the course of human history. 12 months ago if I had said that, some people would have rolled their eyes at me, but I think it’s safe to say that in the last 9 months we’ve all realized just how powerful algorithms are in shaping the outcomes of our culture.

      This is a pretty useful example of a paragraph with subtext, don’t you think? Could easily imagine future readers and annotators coming to this passage and scratching their heads for a minute while looking at the date. What happened nine months before June 2017? Living outside the US, it took me a few seconds to guess it (and my guess may be wrong). Of course, Martha was “playing for the audience” (though DoOO is having an impact outside the US). There’s indeed a shared understanding that events in the political arena may be relevant in our work on digital literacies.

    22. In this particular case, Google worked as a kind of amplifier of distortion.

    23. Perhaps they will learn something about how a hacker can gain access to Web sites and why there is a burden on those of us who create on the Web to also secure what we create.

    24. every moment in which we walk a student through a fix is a deeply teachable moment

    25. the breaking and fixing of things is where the most learning can occur

    26. Digital Pedagogy Lab Institute

    27. realize that the web was not something that happened to them but they were happening to

    28. An overarching value we try to embrace when we talk about the domain choice is one of agency: participants should be able determine for themselves how they wish to be known and found on the Web.

    29. our CIO said that sure he could put some money to a pilot that did something like this

      Fateful. It might not be about investing resources, but some may miscalculate the resources needed or available for such initiatives.

    30. attaching our project’s goals to a defined institutional need allowed us to move forward

      Key lesson, here.

    31. institutionally controlled assessment and collection of data

    32. give a student an individually-controlled space for reflection and growth

    33. Oh, and some people also thought that perhaps it would benefit a student to have an online presence that they could create, develop, and take with them when they graduated from UMW.

    34. The College of Education faculty and administrators needed an ePortfolio because of increasing demands from the Commonwealth of Virginia to demonstrate students’ and graduates’ competencies.

    1. As an example, one of the most significant problems in healthcare security is the need for users to authenticate quickly to shared workstations in clinical environments. I could see a future version of Face ID embedded in an iMac solving that problem, changing an entire industry, and selling a lot of iMacs!

      Sounds very unlikely.

    1. Mount St. Mary’s use of predictive analytics to encourage at-risk students to drop out to elevate the retention rate reveals how analytics can be abused without student knowledge and consent

      Wow. Not that we need such an extreme case to shed light on the perverse incentives at stake in Learning Analytics, but this surely made readers react. On the other hand, there’s a lot more to be said about retention policies. People often act as though they were essential to learning. Retention is important to the institution but are we treating drop-outs as escapees? One learner in my class (whose major is criminology) was describing the similarities between schools and prisons. It can be hard to dissipate this notion when leaving an institution is perceived as a big failure of that institution. (Plus, Learning Analytics can really feel like the Panopticon.) Some comments about drop-outs make it sound like they got no learning done. Meanwhile, some entrepreneurs are encouraging students to leave institutions or to not enroll in the first place. Going back to that important question by @sarahfr: why do people go to university?

    2. Embracing an Entrepreneurial Culture on Campus go.nmc.org/uni(Tom Corr, University Affairs, 4 May 2016.) The Ontario Network of Entrepreneurs is gaining global recognition for its efforts to bolster students’ business skills through investing in multiple campus events and programs. For example, the success of Ontario Centres of Excellence has led to the establishment of similar innovation hubs throughout North America, the UK, Australia, and Asia.

      What’s fascinating here is that the province might be cutting a major part of the funding for the Ontario Centres of Excellence, particularly the part which has to do with Entrepreneurship Programs. (My current work is associated with Lead To Win, a Campus-Linked Accelerator out of Carleton University.)

    1. An institution has implemented a learning management system (LMS). The LMS contains a learning object repository (LOR) that in some aspects is populated by all users across the world  who use the same LMS.  Each user is able to align his/her learning objects to the academic standards appropriate to that jurisdiction. Using CASE 1.0, the LMS is able to present the same learning objects to users in other jurisdictions while displaying the academic standards alignment for the other jurisdictions (associations).

      Sounds like part of the problem Vitrine technologie-éducation has been tackling with Ceres, a Learning Object Repository with a Semantic core.

    1. The IMS Global Competencies and Academic Standards Exchange™ specification (CASE)™ is used to exchange information about learning and education competencies. CASE also transmits information about rubrics, criteria for performance tasks, which may or may not be aligned to competencies.

      Interesting that they explicitly talk about tasks which may not be aligned to competencies. Leaves room for co-curricular activities and microcredentials.

    2. Thanks to @jeffgrann for the heads-up! Clearly, people have been waiting for this. We’ll have to wait for the concrete results (not all IMS Global activities make as big of a splash as the others). But it’s very interesting. And needed. For instance, Quebec uses a competencies model all the way to higher education (its Cégeps are post-secondary institutions for vocational training and pre-university education). Thing is, they lack consistent frameworks. CASE won’t make these magically appear, but at least it gives them room for impact.

    1. Often our solutions must co-exist with existing systems. That’s why we also invest time and money in emerging standards, like xAPI or Open Badges, to help connect our platforms together into a single ecosystem for personal, social and data-driven learning.

    1. OLI courses provide an entire experience based on our unique development process.

    1. Barnes & Noble Education, Inc. is now an independent public company and the parent of Barnes & Noble College, trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol, "BNED".

    1. Enhanced learning experience Graduate students now receive upgraded iPads, and all students access course materials with Canvas, a new learning management software. The School of Aeronautics is now the College of Aeronautics; and the College of Business and Management is hosting a business symposium Nov. 15.

      This from a university which had dropped Blackboard for iTunes U.

    1. Download Dr. Brad Wheeler leads university-wide IT services for IU's eight campuses. He has co-founded and led many multi-institutional collaborations with his current work focused on the Unizin Consortium, Kuali, and IU’s mass Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative.

    1. Kroton, the country’s largest university, has about 2 million students

      Wow. Although, it doesn’t say much about what this enrollment figure really represents, by comparison to other for-profits or, perhaps more fittingly, Brazil’s public education system. Still, it’s a big number.

    2. (I would add that the message, “Hey, it’s no big deal to us if we lose some adopters” is not a great one for members of the community who feel like their needs are not being met.)

    3. Moodle Pty—more widely known within the Moodle community as Moodle HQ—does most of the development of the core Moodle code and maintains tight control over which code submitted by third parties gets accepted into the code base

    1. Information from this will be used to develop learning analytics software features, which will have these functions: Description of learning engagement and progress, Diagnosis of learning engagement and progress, Prediction of learning progress, and Prescription (recommendations) for improvement of learning progress.

      As good a summary of Learning Analytics as any.

    1. David Smetters (in the G+ locked-in comments):

      A similar article could have been written 10 years ago about QTI 2.x. The vendors had coalesced around QTI 1.x, tweaking it as needed. Then QTI 2.x was created, but not with involvement by the vendors who implemented QTI 1.x. Somewhere along the way, QTI 2.x was pulled from the IMS website, only to reappear many months later, unchanged. There has been little adoption of QTI 2.x in the market and it still causes confusion for newcomers who think it's the "standard" they should be following.

    2. Obviously, securing student data is critical. There are a lot of data sharing services that shouldn’t be offered until that security can be guaranteed.

    1. Better yet, tangerines and oranges.

      Is that about the colours favoured by both platforms? Does sound like it weakens the point (going from comparing fruits to comparing one citrus with another). The point, eventually, is that Canvas and Moodle occupy a similar space: course-based “learning” management systems.

    1. Technology is about trade-offs; understanding those tradeoffs is essential to making informed decisions. There’s never a “right” choice; only a right choice for you.

    1. a Brazilian Portuguese language textbook they’ve written and maintained for more than 50 years

      !! (Wondering about the “but we worked a lot on this” comment against OER.)

    1. the Hypothesis annotation framework now has the ability to create and anchor multiple iframes on a single web page

    2. if cross-format identifiers like DOIs are used, annotations made in one format (eg, EPUB) can be seen in the same document published in other formats (eg, HTML, PDF) and in other locations.

      Whaa..? This sounds seriously hard. But remarkably clever.

    1. We know that there are few sticky security and implementation issues

      Which is probably why @judell’s tate doesn’t show up in Chrome on my system and there’s weirdness with the scrolling once we accept to load unsafe scripts.

  5. forum.rebus.community forum.rebus.commun