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  1. Jun 2022
    1. Sleeping Too Much Due to DepressionBehavior, Depression, Mental Health <img width="550" height="321" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/sleeping-too-much-550x321.jpg.webp" class="attachment-entry_with_sidebar size-entry_with_sidebar wp-post-image" alt="sleeping too much" /> Table of Contents Is Oversleeping A Symptom of Depression?Some Basic Facts About Depressive DisordersWhat Causes Depression?How Depression Impacts Daily LifeGetting Help for DepressionHolistic Activities Complement Depression TreatmentElevation Behavioral Health Residential Depression Treatment Is Oversleeping A Symptom of Depression? When you feel sad all the time, sleeping becomes an opportunity for relief. Depression depletes your energy anyway, only adding to the desire to lie down and drift off to sleep. When your depressive state leads to sleeping too much, this condition is called hypersomnia, or the opposite of insomnia. Excessive sleeping is a common symptom of major depressive disorder. Escaping emotional pain through sleeping more hours than usual may be a means of self-managing the depression and sleeping too much may be a physiological effect of the reduction of neurotransmitters common among depressed patients. When the symptoms of depression, such as hypersomnia, are so significant that they undermine your quality of life, it is time to seek professional help. Depression is a serious mental health condition that may lead to a daily impairment that can undermine all areas of life. When excessive sleeping has impacted your career or job security, your relationships, or your overall wellbeing, proactive steps to improve psychological health are in order. <img class="aligncenter wp-image-30122 size-large" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/depression-and-sleep-1030x687.jpeg" alt="depression and sleep" width="1030" height="687" /> Some Basic Facts About Depressive Disorders Depression is the second most common mental health disorder experienced by Americans. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, over 17 million Americans are afflicted with this debilitating condition each year. Additionally, 2.3 million adolescents struggle with depression, further defining depression as a serious mental health threat today. In fact, suicide is now the second leading cause of preventable death among young people aged 10-34. These statistics underscore the importance of getting professional help for managing this serious mental health condition. There are several different types of depression, with each type expressing unique features. Treatment for depression will be based on which particular type of depression is present. These types of depressive disorder include: Major depressive disorder MDD is the most widely diagnosed form of depression. A diagnosis of MDD results when five or more of the following symptoms are present for two weeks or longer: Persistent feelings of sadness, despair, or emptiness Irritability Feelings of guilt or worthlessness Fatigue Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed Difficulty making decisions or concentrating Sleep disturbances Changes in eating habits, weight changes Thoughts of suicide or death Dysthymia Dysthymic, or persistent depressive disorder, is a type of depression that persists for more than two years. Someone with dysthymia may experience periods of severe depression alternating with periods of mild depression symptoms for more than two years. Postpartum depression A woman who experiences serious symptoms of depression during and/or after giving birth has postpartum depression. The symptoms may be so severe that the mother is unable to care for her child or for herself. They may experience severe fatigue, exhaustion, and anxiety in addition to the intense sadness. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder PMDD is related to a woman’s hormonal cycle, and features intensified PMS symptoms, such as angry outbursts, hopelessness, irritability, hypersomnia, excessive crying, and sensitivity to rejection. Seasonal affective disorder Climates further from the equator may lead to depression symptoms that are caused by a lack of sun exposure during the winter months. The individual may experience the symptoms of sleeping too much depression, weight gain, and isolation behaviors in addition to other depression symptoms. We Can Help! Call Now! (888) 561-0868 Bipolar depression This type of depressive disorder features alternating dramatic and unpredictable shifts between depressive and manic moods. The low mood episodes are classified as bipolar depression What Causes Depression? Depression is an extremely complex mental health disorder. Why is it that some people seem to manage serious life events, such as the death of a loved one, a job loss, divorce, or other traumatic events, while others succumb to depression? To date, science has not yet determined the exact causes or factors related to depression, although ongoing research continues to offer new clues. For example, a recent study out of Japan reveals the action of certain protein signaling that may affect mood. The authors, Kobayashi et.al., state, “Taken together these findings suggest that RGS8 participates in modulation of depression-like behavior through ciliary MCHR1 expressed in the CA1 region.” Some of the factors that have been also been identified as contributing to depression include: Genetics. A family history of depression is one of the biggest predictors of the disorder. Individuals with a close relative who suffers from depression will increase the probability for other family members. Brain function. The neural connections, brain cell growth, and brain chemistry are factors in mood regulation. There is some scientific evidence that chemical imbalances in the brain may contribute to the onset of depression. Temperament. Personality traits, such as how excitable or how sensitive we are by nature can factor into depression. Stressful life events. People respond in their own unique way, often based on temperament, to stressful life events. Grief and loss, trauma, abuse, and many difficult life events can result in sustained and chronic depressed mood. Medical conditions. Some health conditions can contribute to depressions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, lupus, stroke, HIV, Parkinson’s disease, and erectile dysfunction in men. Some medications can also cause depression as a side effect of the drug. Substance abuse. Alcohol or drug abuse may precede the onset of depression. The negative consequences that follow a substance use disorder may overwhelm the individual and depression can develop as a result. How Depression Impacts Daily Life Living with depression on a day-to-day basis can have a significant impact on quality of life. In addition to the low mood and persistent feelings of sadness, depression can leave the individual feeling unwell. This combination of symptoms will often result in reduced functioning at work and at home. Sleep disruptions, including sleeping too much or sleeping too little, will wreak havoc with concentration, energy and stamina, memory functions, appetite, and can further intensify feelings of despair. When depression causes a person to literally not want to get out of bed all day it can cause a domino effect in all other realms. Hypersomnia may even lead to excessive absences at work and declining work performance overall. Excessive sleeping also has a negative impact on the family dynamic. When mom or dad is holed up in bed the children who are depending on the parent may not have access to the care they deserve. This places more pressure on the well parent to take up the extra burden, which can have an effect on the relationship. Eventually, the impact of depression will touch all aspects of life. Getting Help for Depression The fundamental treatment protocol for depression involves a combination of medication and psychotherapy: Psychotherapy. One-on-one talk therapy sessions allow the therapist to guide the individual toward resolving unaddressed emotional issues that may be contributing to the depression. These may involve past trauma, childhood abuse, grief and loss, divorce, and other painful life events. Cognitive behavioral therapy is useful for helping to guide patients toward established more self-affirming thoughts that lead to positive thought/behavior patterns. Group therapy sessions, such as a depression support group, can also be beneficial to individuals being treated for depression. Medication. Antidepressant drug therapy is the industry standard for depression treatment. There are dozens of antidepressants on the market today. These include SSRIs, SNRIs, MAOIs, and tricyclic antidepressants. The drugs vary in how they impact brain chemistry, and dosing adjustments or even changing to a different drug is common when trying to find the best fit for each patient. If the severity of the depression is becoming concerning it is appropriate to seek a residential mental health program to receive the highest level of mental health support. Although most individuals struggling with depression realize it is likely a temporary condition that will eventually pass, some may begin to believe things will never change. This can cause some to consider harming themselves. A residential mental health program will offer constant support and monitoring, as well as a more intensive and individualized approach to treating depression. Holistic Activities Complement Depression Treatment Psychiatry has begun to embrace holistic therapies as complementary to traditional treatment modalities for depression, as these activities can help reduce stress and induce feelings of calm. Some of the holistic treatment elements include: Yoga. Yoga involves slow, purposeful physical poses with a focus on breathing. Yoga is known to promote relaxation and reduce stress while also strengthening and stretching muscles, and reducing blood pressure and heart rate. Acupuncture. Acupuncture uses tiny needles to open up energy paths in the body thought to assist in the improvement of mind-body connectedness and wellness. Meditation. Mindfulness meditation is also helpful in training the brain to focus purposefully on the present moment, taking in the various sensory stimuli and focusing on rhythmic breathing. Exercise. The positive effects of getting regular exercise are caused by the release of brain chemicals, such as endorphins, serotonin, and dopamine. Aromatherapy. Certain essential oils have been found to relieve symptoms of depressed mood. These include jasmine, citrus oils, bergamot, and chamomile oils. Nutritional counseling. A diet rich in lean proteins, nuts and seeds, fresh vegetables and fruits, oily fish such as salmon, beans, and whole grains can significantly contribute to mental stability. Depression is a manageable mental health disorder. When the symptoms of depression lead to impairment in daily functioning, obtaining the support of a mental health professional is essential to recovery. Elevation Behavioral Health Residential Depression Treatment Elevation Behavioral Health is a Los Angeles-based residential program that offers intensive mental health treatment for depression. When outpatient interventions have been ineffective in improving quality of life, you may benefit from a more targeted treatment protocol. With deluxe accommodations and a highly attentive clinical staff, Elevation Behavioral Health strives to make the client’s stay a comfortable and healing experience. Elevation Behavioral Health offers a full daily schedule of therapies and adjunctive activities to help individuals struggling with depression reclaim their joy and return to healthy functioning. For more information about our program please contact us today at (888) 561-0868. February 17, 2020/0 Comments/by Elevation Behavioral HealthTags: depression and sleeping too much, sleeping a lot depression, sleeping too much depressionShare this entryShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TwitterShare on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VkShare on RedditShare by Mail https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/sleeping-too-much.jpg 324 550 Elevation Behavioral Health https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/logo_ebh.png Elevation Behavioral Health2020-02-17 18:03:032022-06-16 21:57:43Sleeping Too Much Due to Depression 0 replies Leave a ReplyWant to join the discussion? Feel free to contribute! 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      Is oversleeping a symptom of depression? Learn about sleeping too much depression

    1. Elevation Behavioral Health Accepting New Clients: Information on Coronavirus (COVID-19) and How to Protect Yourself WE CAN HELP, CALL NOW (888) 561-0868 <img src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/logo_ebh.png.webp" height="100" width="300" alt='Elevation Behavioral Health' title='' /> Menu Menu Home About Our Team Mental Health Programs Residential Treatment Outpatient Treatment Transitional Living Conditions Treated Depressive Disorders Mood Disorders Personality Disorders Psychotic Disorders Self Harm Disorders Anxiety Disorders Attention Deficit Disorder Trauma Disorders Suicidal Ideation Dual Diagnosis Tour Our Homes Primary Substance Abuse Residential Primary Mental Health Residential Westlake Agoura Hills Admissions Contact Verify Insurance Blog Menu Menu What to Do When You Have Anxiety About Going to WorkAnxiety, Mental Health, Therapy <img width="845" height="321" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Anxiety-about-going-to-work-845x321.jpg.webp" class="attachment-entry_with_sidebar size-entry_with_sidebar wp-post-image" alt="Anxiety about going to work" /> Table of Contents Why Do I Get Anxiety About Going To Work?About Workplace PhobiaWork PhobiaWhat Causes Workplace Phobia or Workplace-related Anxiety?How to Treat Workplace PhobiaElevation Behavioral Health Treats Workplace Phobia and Workplace-related Anxiety Why Do I Get Anxiety About Going To Work? The feelings of anxiety do not begin with the morning alarm bell. Nope, the anxiety about going to work is felt throughout the night with fitful, restless sleep. The mere idea of entering the workplace triggers waves of stress that threaten to undermine any effort to be productive and engaged at work, and often result in calling out sick. Workplace phobia, according to a definition published in Psychology, Health & Medicine, is defined as “a phobic anxiety reaction with symptoms of panic occurring when thinking of or approaching the workplace.” Considering the serious consequences of having anxiety about going to work, this particular phobia can be particularly devastating to not only one’s professional life but their personal life as well. Being unable to keep a job due to this type of phobia can have far-reaching and deleterious consequences. This specific source of this type of anxiety has often been lumped in with various other disorders. These include obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder. This fear work is due to the features of workplace phobia disorder, which can be recognized in these other forms of anxiety disorder. Finding a remedy is critical, and will likely involve a combination of therapies to help the individual overcome the dread and fear of going to work. <img class="aligncenter wp-image-30059 size-large" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-1030x783.jpg.webp" alt="anxiety about going to work everyday" width="1030" height="783" srcset="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-1030x783.jpg.webp 1030w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-300x228.jpg.webp 300w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-768x584.jpg.webp 768w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-1536x1168.jpg.webp 1536w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-1500x1141.jpg.webp 1500w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday-705x536.jpg.webp 705w,https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/anxiety-about-going-to-work-everyday.jpg.webp 1620w" sizes="(max-width: 1030px) 100vw, 1030px" /> About Workplace Phobia Individuals who have anxiety about going to work may exhibit a higher level of psychosomatic symptoms. These are the physical symptoms that can accompany a mental health condition, including gastrointestinal distress, migraines, pain, headaches, and fatigue, and often result in excessive absenteeism due to sick days. In fact, one 2014 study published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine found that 10% of patients with chronic mental health conditions who sought sick leave authorizations for their physical symptoms suffered from workplace phobia. Identifying workplace phobia is essential in turning the ship around and overcoming a disorder that is negatively impacting the quality of life. Employers also benefit from gaining an understanding of this type of anxiety, as loss of productivity related to paid sick days, having to hire temporary workers, and the impact on fellow coworkers are added costs to the business. Work Phobia Intense irrational fear emerges when the individual thinks about or attempts to go to work. The triggering stimuli, such as encountering the supervisor or colleague, can cause symptoms like those of a specific phobia, such as: We Can Help! Call Now! (888) 561-0868 Sweating Hot flashes, chills Trembling Choking sensation Inability to face the trigger (enter the workplace) Chest pain, tightness Dry mouth Ringing in the ears Intensive fear when approaching or considering the workplace Shortness of breath A sensation of butterflies in the stomach Mental confusion, disorientation Rapid heart rate Nausea Headaches Reduction of symptoms when leaving or avoiding the workplace When exposed to the workplace trigger, the symptoms are so uncomfortable and frightening that the anxiety about going to work can result in avoidance behaviors, thus the high rates of sick leave. According to an article published in the Journal of Anxiety Disorders, There are several subtypes of work phobic, including: Work-related anxiety Work-related panic Work-related social phobia Work-related phobia Work-related generalized anxiety Work-related PTSD What Causes Workplace Phobia or Workplace-related Anxiety? Workplace phobia also referred to as can have various causal factors. Aside from the existence of a disorder such as social anxiety, which can feature workplace anxiety or phobia features, other risk factors might include: Having had a prior work-related experience that was traumatic, such as sexual harassment or bullying Performance-based fears Fear of required oral presentations Ongoing interpersonal issues and conflicts with a superior Family history of social anxiety or phobia Multiple traumas or significant negative life events lead to coping or stress-management issues at work How to Treat Workplace Phobia Treating work-related anxiety will revolve around changing the thought distortions that lead to avoidant behaviors or panic symptoms. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a type of psychotherapy that helps patients identify the dysfunctional thought-behavior patterns and guide them toward reframing thoughts to eventually be able to cope when confronting the work-related trigger. Combining CBT with exposure therapies that help desensitize the patient to the triggering event or situation can yield positive results. Medication also plays a role in the treatment of workplace phobia or anxiety. Drugs that reduce anxiety, such as benzodiazepines or beta-blockers, may help improve the individual’s ability to function in the workplace once again. Certain holistic strategies can assist in the reduction of stress or anxiety symptoms. These might include yoga, guided meditation, deep breathing exercises, mindfulness, getting regular exercise, and reducing caffeine intake. Elevation Behavioral Health Treats Workplace Phobia and Workplace-related Anxiety Elevation Behavioral Health is a luxury residential mental health program located in Los Angeles, California. The team at Elevation has crafted a highly effective treatment protocol for treating workplace phobia or anxiety, using an integrative approach. This includes evidence-based therapies, such as cognitive behavioral therapy and exposure therapy, adjunctive therapies, such as EMDR, and holistic therapies that provide additional coping skills through mindfulness training and meditation. For more information about our program, please contact Elevation Behavioral Health today at (888) 561-0868. June 26, 2020/0 Comments/by Elevation Behavioral HealthTags: anxiety, Anxiety about going to work, anxiety before work, anxiety going to work, fear of going to work, fear of work, going to work, phobia, work, work phobiaShare this entryShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VkShare on RedditShare by Mail
  2. May 2022
    1. When a Depressed Teenager Won’t Get Out of BedDepression, Mental Health, Teens, Treatment<img width="845" height="321" src="https://bnitreatment.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/depressed-teenager-wont-get-out-of-bed-845x321.jpg" class="wp-image-30325 avia-img-lazy-loading-not-30325 attachment-entry_with_sidebar size-entry_with_sidebar wp-post-image" alt="depressed teenager won&#039;t get out of bed" /> Table of Contents Your Depressed Teenager Won’t Get Out of Bed. Now What?About Teen DepressionCauses of Teen DepressionSuicide Risk for Depressed TeensGetting Help for a Teen with DepressionBNI Treatment Provides Residential Mental Health Treatment for Teens Your Depressed Teenager Won’t Get Out of Bed. Now What? It is hard for a parent to admit that something is not right with their child. Sure, when the teen years hit it is very common to notice an increase in moodiness and drama. But when the teenager flat out refuses to leave their bed, it is cause for worry, indeed. Teens may go through a tough time, maybe due to social problems, family issues, or trouble at school. In most cases, these kinds of problems are usually short-lived and the teen will cycle through the emotions in time. Sometimes, though, depression can be at the root of the teen’s desire to stay isolated in their room. Parents who suspect their teen is struggling with depression should enlist the help of a trained mental health expert. Teen depression should not be ignored, as suicides in this age cohort are on the rise. About Teen Depression When your teen won’t leave their room, or even get out of bed, and this persists, it might be due to depression. The NIH reports that teen depression now affects 13.3% of our youth between the ages of 13-17. This reflects about 3.2 million teens. Rates of depression are almost twice as high in teen girls versus boys. Symptoms of teen depression may include: Feeling sad or hopeless. Changes in sleep patterns. Changes in eating habits; sudden weight gain or loss. Fatigued, listless. Loss of interest in usual hobbies. Irritable; angry outbursts Withdraws from friends and family. Low self-esteem. Sensitive to peer rejection or being criticized. Trouble paying attention in school. Frequent headaches or stomach aches. Talks about death, suicidal thoughts. Teens that are still showing these signs after a two-week period should be seen by a doctor. Causes of Teen Depression Teen depression is somewhat of a mystery. With all the advances made in science and so much research, the exact cause of depression is still not known. Hormone changes during the teen years may contribute somewhat, and there are other risk factors for depression as well. Some of these risk factors include: Family History. Depression is more common among teens with family members who also suffer from it. Teen Hormones. The influx of growth and sex hormones during the teen years can impact brain chemistry. Family Changes. Teens may have a tough time working through a difficult life event. It might involve moving to another town or school, a divorce, or a death in the family. Social Anxiety. The teen years are stressful. Social anxiety can be a problem for some teens. The social skills may not yet be developed, so the teen may struggle with fitting in or with feeling rejected. Social Media. Prolonged exposure to social media can lead to depression. Teens are very self-conscious of their looks and social media can make them more insecure. Body dysmorphia, being bullied, and eating disorders are common. School Pressures. Young people feel a lot of pressure to excel in high school as they look toward college. Some teens struggle with grades or a learning deficit and may come to feel they are letting their parents down. Childhood Trauma. A history of abuse or neglect can trigger depression even years later. Romantic Breakups. During the heightened emotions of the teen years, romantic feelings are intense. When a breakup or rejection occurs it can be very hard for the teen to deal with. Covid-19. The lingering effects of the Covid-19 pandemic have had a deep impact on teens. Long months of social isolation and loneliness, as well as the many changes Covid brought, have been hard on teens. Suicide Risk for Depressed Teens Teen suicide has spiked in recent years. Suicide is now the second leading cause of death for young people between ages 10-24, according to data from the CDC. In teens, the danger is the still immature limbic system in the brain. This is the region that controls decision-making and impulsivity. A teen may decide on a whim to just “end it all” because they do not have the coping skills. Where an adult can better manage difficult emotions, a teen isn’t equipped because their brain is still developing. Call Our Parent Hotline (888) 522-1504 Warning signs of suicide among teens include: Impulsive behaviors. Becoming more withdrawn. Giving away prized possessions. Having angry outbursts, rage, or violent behaviors. Feeling like they have no real purpose in life. Obsessed with thoughts of death and suicide. Chronic sleep problems. Changes in eating and sleeping habits. Feelings of shame, guilt, excessive worry, or grief. Stops showing up for activities once enjoyed. Substance abuse. Obtaining the means to complete suicide, such as weapon or pills. Getting Help for a Teen with Depression So what does a parent do if their depressed teenager won’t get out of bed? The first big step is to not ignore the teen’s behavior and mood state. A day or two, fine, but a week or longer is a warning sign not to be ignored. Set up a meeting with the family doctor as a starting point. Once a health issue is ruled out, the doctor can refer the teen to a mental health provider. In most cases, the teen will be treated with outpatient actions at first. This is likely to involve an antidepressant and talk therapy. If the teen’s mood state worsens, though, it is time to consider a more intensive treatment solution. A residential program offers the teen a place to work through the issues that are factors in the depression. These programs also offer tutoring so the teen can keep up with school while in treatment. The mental health program includes: Therapy. This is offered in both one on one and group formats. Includes evidence-based therapies like CBT, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and solutions-focused therapy. Life skills.  The teens will be taught new coping skills, communication skills, conflict resolution techniques, and relating skills. Meds. Some teens may benefit from drug therapy, although the risks must be weighed. Holistic. Some activities enhance results, such as surf therapy, equine therapy, recreational therapy, art, dance, music, and drama therapy, and yoga. If your depressed teenager won’t get out of bed, and they aren’t getting better, consider a residential program for teens. BNI Treatment Provides Residential Mental Health Treatment for Teens BNI Treatment Centers give parents the needed support for helping a teen with depression. The expert psychiatric staff has designed a program that is attuned to the needs of teens, protocols that teens will respond to. For any questions about the program, please contact BNI today at (888) 522-1504.
    1. What to Do About Teenage Cell Phone AddictionAddiction, Mental Health, Self Esteem, Treatment<img width="845" height="321" src="https://bnitreatment.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/teenage-cell-phone-addiction-845x321.jpg" class="wp-image-30300 avia-img-lazy-loading-not-30300 attachment-entry_with_sidebar size-entry_with_sidebar wp-post-image" alt="teenage cell phone addiction" /> Table of Contents Teenage cell phone addiction disrupts family time, social time, and study time.What is Teenage Cell Phone Addiction?What Are Signs of Teen Cell Phone Addiction SymptomsThe Impact of Teen Social Media Addiction on Mental HealthWhat Do You Do If Your Teenage Is Addicted to Their PhoneBNI Treatment Centers Helps Teens with Mental Health Disorders Teenage cell phone addiction disrupts family time, social time, and study time. For a teen, having a cell phone is like being a kid in a candy store. With app stores offering a never-ending array of options, it is easy to see how teens get addicted to their phones. By design, software companies have found ways to draw people into their digital products, including teens. Social media apps, and there are many, gobble up the most time among teens. Teens are on these social apps for several hours a day. Data show that teens spend about 3 hours a day on social media. An astounding 20% of teens are on these social platforms for more than 5 hours a day. On average, teens are on their phones about 7 hours per day. Smartphone addiction is very real. When teens use the apps, they will receive a dopamine hit that gets logged in the brain’s reward system. This leads to the teen spending ever more time on their phones, as the behavior gets continually reinforced. Keep reading to learn more about teen cell phone addiction and what can be done to curb the problem. What is Teenage Cell Phone Addiction? There is ample research showing how smartphone overuse, especially social media, impacts the brain. In fact, it can cause the same brain chemical responses as a drug. When a teen sees new likes, positive comments, or new followers on their feeds, they receive a burst of dopamine. Similar to a drug’s high, as social app use escalates, the more engagement they crave. The time spent engaging on social feeds will increase more and more as this reward cycle takes hold. The teen may put off other activities they once enjoyed in exchange for spending more time on their phones. Homework is not completed, which affects the teen’s grades. Sleep is forfeited, which impacts their health in many ways. In person social time is traded off for engaging with strangers on their social media feeds. All of these adverse effects caused by excess cell phone use can lead to mental health issues. Anxiety can result due to the time wasted on the phone. This causes stress because the teen now lacks time to complete their schoolwork or chores. Too much time online also results in depression, mainly because the teen begins to feel lonely. What Are Signs of Teen Cell Phone Addiction Symptoms As with other behavioral addictions, there will be certain signs the teen displays. Signs of a teenage cell phone addiction might include: Teen cannot carry on a live conversation. Teen is always scrolling and clicking around on their phone. Teen is not able to be without their phone, even for a few minutes. Teen shows signs of depression the more they are on their phone. Teen becomes obsessed with selfies and their social feels. Teen is having sleep problems. Teen’s grades drop, due to reduced time for studying or homework. Parents might want to think about having a digital time out, where all phones are shelved for a day or a weekend. Taking a break from the cell phones will do the whole family a lot of good. The Impact of Teen Social Media Addiction on Mental Health During the teen years, the brain is still under construction. The teen brain is more vulnerable to things that could lead to an addiction, like video games and social media. A recent study explains how the reward system in the teenage brain works. Call Our Parent Hotline (888) 522-1504 It shows the same type of dopamine release in response to social media likes as one might have to a drug. The study also points out that the teen will show “withdrawal” symptoms, like irritability and anxiety. This happens when they are not allowed to use their cell phone or social media. But anxiety and depression in themselves can be a result of too much cell phone use. Studies show that teens that spend large amounts of time on social platforms suffer from higher levels of mental health issues. This is due to the time spent on social apps, which can fuel low self-esteem, body dysmorphia, and bullying. Also, excess time on smartphones means a lack of in person contact with friends and family. Face-to-face time is traded off for huge amounts of time chatting online with strangers. These interactions are shallow and do not lead to any real human connection. Over time, this can result in feelings of loneliness and depression. What Do You Do If Your Teenage Is Addicted to Their Phone Parent Guidelines to Reduce Teenager Cell Phone Addiction Parents can help limit their teen’s cell phone use in several ways. It is likely a waste of time to forbid them to be on their phones, but you can set rules. Remind the teen that having a phone is a privilege, not a right, and that you are paying for it. Of course, guidelines for a 13 year-old will be different from that of a 17 year-old. Consider these tips for parents: Set limits on time for phone use. Set up screen-free periods during the day, with a place for the phone to be stored during that time. Tell the teen the phone will be shut off if their grades drop. Have your teen shut down their cell phone at a certain time each night. Keep communication open and bring up any concerns if you think they might be bullied on social media. Have clear consequences should the teen break your cell phone rules. Suggest your teen take breaks from their cell phone to enjoy an outdoor activity. Teach the teen about online predators. Limit the types of social media platforms they can use. Because social media isn’t going anywhere, it is best for parents to take the offense and partner with their teen to help them negotiate the challenges and emotional landmines together. Learning ways to reduce the chances for teenage cell phone addiction can help your teen avoid risks to mental health. BNI Treatment Centers Helps Teens with Mental Health Disorders BNI Treatment Centers provides the intensive treatment and support needed for teens with depression or anxiety disorders. Teens who struggle with mental health issues related to smartphone addiction are guided toward making better use of their time. For more details about our program, call BNI today at (888) 522-1504.

      Parent Guidelines to Reduce Teenager addicted to Cell Phone

      Parents can help limit their teen’s cell phone use in several ways. It is likely a waste of time to forbid them to be on their phones, but you can set rules.

  3. Apr 2022
    1. https://winnielim.org/essays/tending-to-my-garden/

      Though intended perhaps to lean more towards gardening oneself into mental health, I read this from the perspective of cultivating and tending a digital garden, which for me is a fun and relaxing practice.

    2. Oliver Sacks wrote that gardens are powerful in healing us.

      Oliver Sacks wrote:

      I cannot say exactly how nature exerts its calming and organizing effects on our brains, but I have seen in my patients the restorative and healing powers of nature and gardens, even for those who are deeply disabled neurologically. In many cases, gardens and nature are more powerful than any medication.

      If gardens and potentially tending gardens is restorative, how might we create user interfaces that are calm and gentle enough to make tending one's digital garden a healthful and restorative process for our psyches?

    1. Neuropsychiatrists at UCLA had found a willing partner in Governor Reagan’s California Department of Justice, to the tune of $750,000 (equivalent to roughly $4.5 million today), and a whopping $1.5 million from the state. It was prominently affiliated with researchers like Vernon Mark and Frank Ervin, who had gained scientific fame for their work creating brain implants in human patients to change behavior and motivation; also on board was former LAPD police chief James Fiske, a man known for terrorizing the city’s Black population.

      It looks like Ronald Reagan had issues with mental health care even as far back as the 1970s. This incident at UCLA was just a precursor to defunding state mental health care that was already apparently having issues at the time.

    1. Tyler Black, MD. (2021, December 10). Statistics Canada has been asking kids about mental health during the pandemic. Initially, after the first 5 months (with school shutdowns, summer break, lots of restrictions), more kids said they were better than worse, most reported no change. 86% “No change or better” [/1] https://t.co/3shKtrxEVU [Tweet]. @tylerblack32. https://twitter.com/tylerblack32/status/1469380405451100162

  4. Mar 2022
  5. Feb 2022
    1. Ana Mardoll. (2022, February 12). I used to be a history major, with a focus on social history. And I remember reading about WW2 in a very fascinating book about the evolution of courtship and dating dynamics in America. (I’m going somewhere with this, bear with me.) [Tweet]. @AnaMardoll. https://twitter.com/AnaMardoll/status/1492398681303261184

    1. Heesakkers, H., van der Hoeven, J. G., Corsten, S., Janssen, I., Ewalds, E., Simons, K. S., Westerhof, B., Rettig, T. C. D., Jacobs, C., van Santen, S., Slooter, A. J. C., van der Woude, M. C. E., van den Boogaard, M., & Zegers, M. (2022). Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With 1-Year Survival Following Intensive Care Unit Treatment for COVID-19. JAMA, 327(6), 559–565. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2022.0040

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2022, January 20). @timcolbourn @OmicronData I can’t, for example, imagine someone saying “handwashing is of limited use it only ‘delays’ getting norovirus”. So, I think it seems worth unpacking the many presuppositions involved in your “just delay” framing 1/n [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1484075371108646914

    1. Nursing professionals are facing with severe sleep problems during the covid 19 pandemic time. Nurses were asked to work in an environment that had a more increased level of risk than ever before. Depression and anxiety from the workplace could affect the confidence of healthcare workers in themselves as well as general trust in the healthcare system. This will lead to their turnover intention which may undermine the efforts of the governments to control the COVID-19 pandemic. The rising concern may change the working schedules of healthcare workers, offering more occupational healthcare support.

  6. Jan 2022
    1. Deanna Behrens, MD (she/her). (2022, January 30). One U.S. child loses a parent or caregiver for every four COVID-19-associated deaths I’m not discounting mental health effects of the pandemic on children. That is real. But the risks associated with #COVID19 for children and its affects on them aren’t always obvious [Tweet]. @DeannaMarie208. https://twitter.com/DeannaMarie208/status/1487607849664581634

    1. Une énorme charge de travail pour les étudiants n’est pas un indicateur de rigueur.

      Given learners' current levels of anxiety, Quebec's Action Plan on Higher Education Mental Health could become quite significant. Wonder who's currently finding solutions to these issues. Workload is controversial enough a topic that a "Design Thinking" #SolutionMode might be even more fitting than assessments of what counts as a heavy burden.

    1. Frenzel, S. B., Junker, N. M., Avanzi, L., Bolatov, A., Haslam, S. A., Häusser, J. A., Kark, R., Meyer, I., Mojzisch, A., Monzani, L., Reicher, S., Samekin, A., Schury, V. A., Steffens, N. K., Sultanova, L., Van Dijk, D., van Zyl, L. E., & Van Dick, R. (2022). A trouble shared is a trouble halved: The role of family identification and identification with humankind in well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. British Journal of Social Psychology, 61(1), 55–82. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12470

    1. Riepenhausen, A., Veer, I., Wackerhagen, C., Reppmann, Z. C., Köber, G., Ayuso-Mateos, J.-L., Bögemann, S., Corrao, G., Felez-Nobrega, M., Abad, J. M. H., Hermans, E., Leeuwen, J. van, Lieb, P. D. K., Lorant, V., Mary-Krause, M., Mediavilla, R., Melchior, M., Mittendorfer-Rutz, E., Compagnoni, M. M., … Walter, H. (2021). Coping with COVID: Risk and Resilience Factors for Mental Health in a German Representative Panel Study. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/fjqpb

  7. Dec 2021
  8. Nov 2021
    1. I think it’s a good idea to have a fall break. Also a mental day. But the mental day has to be productive. A roundtable discussion is a really good idea. Maybe even some group therapy sessions if that’s even a thing. And with students with disabilities. We should also have classes that talk about serious subjects. And also give The students with disabilities a chance to air their grievances. And also have teachers explain to them what’s going on and how they can make a change. Or have some additional counseling. Maybe we can even have a way to make sure everybody is safe both physically mentally. And educationally. Students with disabilities have a right to. It’s harder for students is with mental challenges to grasp at serious subject. Maybe we should have a class maybe at the Achieve center like a roundtable class or a class and teaching us how to be more resilient. How to deal with trauma and PTSD and she CPTSD.

  9. Oct 2021
  10. Sep 2021
  11. Aug 2021
  12. Jul 2021
    1. Roy Perlis. (2021, May 21). Finally: We looked at rates of vaccination among depressed/non-depressed people. 13-point gap, but not because of resistance. Underappreciated opportunity to reach people who need more help accessing vaccines? @celinegounder @CDCDirector @ASlavitt @MDaware https://t.co/EHa80z1YCH [Tweet]. @royperlis. https://twitter.com/royperlis/status/1395744126813937666

    1. Rodolfo: I'm a victim of sexual abuse in the United States and there was a police report made and everything. And I've also been a victim of gang violence. I was never, you can check my background and everything. I was never into gangs or anything, but around the area I lived in there was a bunch of gangs and... I was beat up two or three times bad just by walking home. And it was all documented, I had police reports and everything. And because of that I was in therapy for while. My mother sought out a help from a psychiatrist because of the sexual abuse I had as a child in California, as a matter of fact.Rodolfo: I took Risperdal and a Ritalin, Risperdal for the anxiety and the Ritalin and for the ADHD. So, we tried everything. The mental health side, the mental health asylum, everything. But it was just going to take longer and longer and longer and I was tired of it. I didn't want to be locked up anymore. So, finally I just told my mom, “You know what man, that's it, I'm done. I don't want to do this anymore.” She asked me, “Is this what you want to do?” And I told her, “Yeah.”Rodolfo: She told me, “You know what? I'd much rather see you over there and be free then not being able to see you here at all.” Because there was a lot of people that went to go visit their loved ones and they used to get picked up. Sometimes they wouldn't even let you see your loved ones and right away ask you for your identification, your social security card, your nationality and everything and they would get picked up.Rodolfo: And I always told my mom, “Don't ever come visit me. Don't ever come visit me because if you do, chances are they're going to take you too.” And you know, that would always break my heart because I would want to see my mom. I'd want to see my dad and everything, but I wasn't able to. So, that experience was just horrible.Sergio: When you were in the detention center what were the conditions? Did you have access the medicine you needed? Did you have access to food and water?Rodolfo: The company that made the jail was called GEO Corp and they were actually, I'm not going to lie to you, they actually were pretty good, health-wise, not so much security-wise. A lot of things would happen in there that definitely shouldn't have ever happened. But with the food and everything, it was good. In my opinion it was because of the company. I feel as though if it was up to the government... Thank God it was an independent company that was hired by DHS as opposed to if DHS were to make their own jail, I feel they would be completely different.Rodolfo: It was [Pause] a pleasantly... there's no way to describe it, it was bad. It was bad, but for what it was I guess it was okay. I don't see there being an in-between or any pretty way to paint that picture as to how good or bad it was in there. Because at the end of the day you're deprived of your freedom. You can't just pick up the phone whenever you want and call your loved ones because you've got to pay for that too. You got pay for that. And if you want to take a shower, you have to buy your soap, right? You've got to buy it yourself, you've got to buy everything. And now you're becoming a liability for your family, you're becoming another bill.Rodolfo: You're becoming another bill and that's what I didn't want. So, that's why I started working. And now, older, I'm becoming another bill. So, I don't get it. You're taking us away from the jobs that we have and everything. You know? So, take us back to our country. And I'm not sure if it this is a fact or not, but I was reading when I first got in here, there was a time where there wasn't enough field workers for, I think, avocado—or, not avocado, I think it was oranges or something like that.Rodolfo: And I remember me saying, “Well, there goes all the deportees. There goes all the people you guys deported. Where are the people that were so outraged because we took your jobs? Go ahead, there you go. There are a lot of vacancies, making these open for those jobs, go ahead, man. All yours buddy, knock yourself out.”Rodolfo: But nobody wants to work those jobs, right? You see what I'm saying though, right?

      Leaving the US, Reason for Return, Deportation, Voluntary departure, Family decision, No hope for a future in the US, Detention, Treatment by; Time in the US, Violence, Sexual Abuse, Gangs, Bullying, Fear of, Jobs/employment/work