38 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. ISPI offers a variety of publications, from its member-exclusive monthly and quarterly journals, "Performance Improvement Journal and Performance Improvement Quarterly,"

      International Society for Performance Improvement This is the web page of the professional association. It is similar to other professional association web pages. Some content is available only to those with a membership; individuals must log in. There are links to the publications. These include Performance Improvement Journal, Performance Improvement Quarterly, Performance Xpress. Some features of the website can become a bit difficult to drill down to but there are sometimes job aids and other immediately usable content available. This topic relates to shaping performance of adult employees on the job. Rating: 4/5

    1. Resources & Tools

      This is the web page of the Association for Talent Development, formerly know as the American Association for Training and Development. The specific page that I am bookmarking is for their resource collection. There are job aids, job announcements, discussion boards, and professional conferences, though some items can only be accessed with membership. Rating 4/5

  2. Jan 2019
    1. semester-long, graded course on pedagogy through my university’s Learning Assistant Program.

      I would like to see the NYU course syllabus to see what pedagogy-related topics they cover.

    1. But this one didn’t just argue that how I dress influences student perceptions, it argued that it directly affects my ratings, and more importantly, my students’ behavior in class and the quality of their learning.

      What's the best way to tell GTAs this?

  3. Nov 2018
    1. In today's fast-paced knowledge-intensive economy, work of importanceis increasingly accomplished coUaboratively through informal networks. As aresult, assessing and supporting strategically important informal networks inorganizations can yield substantial performance benefits. In addition, networkrelationships are critical anchoring points for employees, whose loyalty andcommitment may be more to sets of individuals in their network than to a givenorganization. Our research (and that of others) has found that these informalnetworks are increasingly important contributors to employee job satisfactionand performance. Yet despite their importance, these networks are rarely well-supported or even understood by the organizations in which they are embedded.Social network analysis provides a means with which to identify and assess thehealth of strategically important networks within an organization. By makingvisible these otherwise "invisible" patterns of interaction, it becomes possible towork with important groups to facilitate effective collaboration

      The author does a great job of examining social relationships and the effect they have in the workplace. The author asserts that by making the connections and work visible there will be a better result.

      9/10

    1. A number of authors argue that professional development requires adual focus on both knowledge of subject matter content and an understand-ing of how children learn specific content.

      This article addresses what makes professional development effective and why. It reviews study results to show what works in a national sample of teachers. This article has good information on professional development.

      9/10

    1. Social-based tools are gaining acceptance in the workplace.

      This article explains how a wiki can be used as a collaborative tool in the workplace. The author explains how they can be used, the advantages, and tips.

      8/10

    1. Our Sample Professional Development (PD) Activity Collection is designed to serve as a resource to PD providers creating training events both for practicing educators and beginning teachers engaged in induction experiences. In this collection, users will find examples of the ways in which information about evidence-based practices,

      The page has a template, activities, and resources instructors can use to help create professional development courses. Rating: 4/5

    1. Teachers often attend professional development that does not pertain to them and what they do. This article looks into various adult learning theories that can be implemented to make professional development more meaningful for the teachers. These learning theories are action learning, experiential learning, project based learning, and self-directed learning. The article recommends blending the different adult learning theories to create a professional development teachers will find relevant to them. The article also states leadership helps direct the relevance of the professional development. Different leadership styles are highlighted and how it helps improve professional development. Rating: 5/5

  4. teacherlink.ed.usu.edu teacherlink.ed.usu.edu
    1. This article looks at several adult learning theories. The theories are: age and stage, cognitive development, and functional, Age and stage theory sates that a learner's age and stage of development plays a part in they way they learn. Cognitive development is when learning goes from concrete to more abstract and learning is intrinsic. Functional theory is when learning problem centered and self directed. Rating: 5/5

    1. In addition to discussing Knowles Andragogy learning theory this article also looks into two other adult learning theories: experiential and transformational. For learning to be successful in adults instructional designers need to "tap into prior experiences," "create a-ha moments," and "create meaning" by connecting to reality. Rating: 5/5

    1. In this case study the instructional designers used a contextualized model of active learning to provide professional learning to teachers in urban alternative high schools. The teachers were given reading assignments, activities that were relevant and engaging to them, and time to reflect at the end of the session. The participants enjoyed the "learner-centered" model of professional development and found it effective and worth to their learning. Rating: 4/5

    1. While this article does not deal with technology in adult education, it does discuss several elements needed to make professional development for educators more meaningful. This helps find the learning valuable thereby creating opportunity for them to implement strategies and techniques learned into their own teaching. Rating: 5/5

    1. This article is from a credible, peer-reviewed journal. The source is current and relevant to professional and adult learning. The authors document a study of teachers and their learning and how adult learning theory can improve results.

      7/10

    1. This article is from the journal Professional Development in Education, it is a credible and relevant source. This authors analyze cases in principle professional development in four schools to find common practice. They determine if and how adult learning theory is or can be used to improve practices.

      8/10

    1. This article uses librarians at graduate institutions to study the effect of a professional development program. The instruction was designed to teach adult learning theory. The article includes the instruction and assessment of the program.

      8/10

  5. Jul 2018
  6. May 2018
  7. Mar 2018
    1. . This internal event about teaching excellence at Warwick saw staff exploring physical and virtual spaces, connecting virtually with Marcin Klébin @makle1 in Poland; the doors to the EuroCALL conference were opened this year thanks to collaboration with Maha Bali +Maha Bali and Virtually Connecting, my students have created open educational resources and even contributed to online conferences, the WIHEA #knowhow project (see https://storify.com/WarwickLanguage/warwick-window-on-teaching) produced resources and connections to help others decide on a path to opening up their work.

      Connected events

  8. Nov 2017
  9. Oct 2017
  10. Mar 2017
  11. Feb 2017
    1. instructional staff

      I think Nathaniel is right to point out a gender problem, as he has in his marginal comment, here. However, I think we also see a class problem arising more starkly. Whereas before there was a certain "professionalization" automatically associated with teaching at the college level, the "respectability" teaching once granted has disappeared. Although he does not explicitly invoke the word "class," Weaver clearly feels that those who make up the "instructional staff" are low in stature and respectability. To be a little crass, this sounds an awful lot like Weaver is complaining about "the neighborhood going down hill," so to speak. Although the "instructional staff" presumably have some sort of authority and experience to earn this teaching role, Weaver sees their arrival as signaling the decline of rhetoric as he once knew it, rather than seeing it as a sign that rhetoric is becoming more accessible and that more groups of people are actively engaging in rhetoric.

    1. It is true I am a woman; it is true I am employed; but what professional experiences have I had? I

      This reminds me of Iris Young's "Five Faces of Oppression." Young argues that we often neglect to see the many faces of oppression, and that we misrepresent reality by comparing dissimilar experiences of oppression as existing under the same general umbrella of subjectivity. Anyone who experiences even one face of oppression is oppressed, but many individuals and groups experience oppression differently because they may experience different combinations of the faces of oppression. One face of oppression which often goes overlooked is "powerlessness."

      Powerlessness is a distinction between technical freedom and actual self-possession and choice. Examples Young gives are that although we are technically allowed to choose our employer, many employees are placed at the bottom of the totem pole, where they are dictated to, rather than consulted about their own work. Those who work menial jobs, for example, in which the minutia of their jobs (what to do and how to do it) are strictly controlled are powerless. In contrast, professionals such as doctors, teachers, managers, etc. are given a degree of freedom and choice about how to best go about their work, and they might even have employees working under them, whose work they get to control. This freedom gives one "respectability" in the eyes of society and one's own eyes. If someone does not have access to professionalization, they are denigrated for this lack of "respectability," by the implication that they are inferior to professionals. This, of course, becomes a vicious economic and psychological cycle.

      This system of oppression through powerlessness is what Woolf is referencing here. Although she is employed, society has denied her the freedom allotted to most literary professionals, most of whom are men. She is employed, but she is not a professional because she is denied the freedom and respectability that being a professional connotes.

  12. Jan 2017
    1. DENNIS WEIS Co-author of Mass and Raw Muscle; former champion body builder and powerlifter. “…Serious Growth can’t help but take a bodybuilder into a 4th dimension of fresh new muscle growth.”
    2. EDMUND ENOS, Ph.D. Associate professor of exercise science - Concordia University; leading authority on bodybuilding and strength training “…thanks to serious growth, America has again become a world leader in developing advanced bodybuilding and strength training programs.”
    3. What bodybuilding professionals are saying about serious growth…
    4. Over 40,000 hard-core bodybuilders already used this system with the most spectacular results I've ever seen. Many of the most respected professional athletes are raving about this training breakthrough
  13. Oct 2016
  14. Sep 2016
  15. Jul 2016
    1. “In my perfect world, I have a competency profile — you know, on LinkedIn, presumably — that is kept up to date in real time on the competencies that I am exhibiting in my work, as well as competencies that I’ve demonstrated through assessments, through my education, the formal credentials that I’ve accrued,”

      It’s a very specific dream, but it sounds like it’s shared by a lot of people.

  16. Jun 2016
    1. Everyone is aware of that risk, although it is usually not acknowledged with the explicitness that one finds in the opening sentence of Raymond Waddington's essay on books 11 and 12 of Paradise Lost. "Few of us today," Waddington writes, "could risk echoing C. S. Lewis's condemnation of the concluding books of Paradise Lost as an 'untransmuted lump of futurity"' (9). The nature of the risk that Wad- dington is about not to take is made clear in the very next sentence, where we learn that a generation of critics has been busily demonstrating the subtlety and complexity of these books and establishing the fact that they are the product of a controlled poetic design. What this means is that the kind of thing that one can now say about them is constrained in advance, for, given the present state of the art, the critic who is concerned with maintaining his or her professional credentials is obliged to say something that makes them better. Indeed, the safest thing the critic can say (and Waddington proceeds in this es- say to say it) is that, while there is now a general recognition of the excellence of these books, it is still the case that they are faulted for some deficiency that is in fact, if properly understood, a virtue. Of course, this rule (actually a rule of thumb) does not hold across the board. When Waddington observes that "few of us today could risk," he is acknowledging, ever so obliquely, that there are some of us who could. Who are they, and how did they achieve their special status? Well, obviously C. S. Lewis was once one (although it may not have been a risk for him, and if it wasn't why wasn't it?), and if he had not already died in 1972, when Waddington was writing, presumably he could have been one again. That is, Lewis's status as an authority on Renaissance literature was such that he could offer readings with- out courting the risk facing others who might go against the professional grain, the risk of not being listened to, of remaining unpublished, of being unattended to, the risk of producing something that was by definition-a definition derived from prevailing institutional conditions-without me

      on the necessity of discovering virtue in literary work as a professional convention of our discipline.

      This is a really interesting and useful passage for my first year lectures

    2. Instead they would be dismissed as being a waste of a colleague's time, or as beside the point, or as uninformed, or simply as unprofessional. This last judgment would not be a casual one; to be unprofessional is not simply to have violated some external rule or piece of decorum. It is to have ig- nored (and by ignoring flouted) the process by which the institution determines the conditions under which its rewards will be given or withheld. These conditions are nowhere written down, but they are understood by everyone who works in the field and, indeed, any understanding one might have of the field is inseparable from (because it will have been produced by) an awareness, often tacit, of these con- ditions

      On the role of professionalism in enforcing community standards:

      [T]o be unprofessional is not simply to have violated some external rule or piece of decorum. It is to have ignored (and by ignoring flouted) the process by which the institution determines the conditions under which its rewards will be given or withheld. These conditions are nowhere written down, but they are understood by everyone who works in the field and, indeed, any understanding one might have of the field is inseparable from (because it will have been produced by) an awareness, often tacit, of these conditions

      This is very applicable to scientific authorship

    3. convention is a way of acknowledging that we are engaged in a com- munity activity in which the value of one's work is directly related to the work that has been done by others;

      Convention is a way of acknowledging we are engaged in a community activity in which the value of one's work is directly related to the work that has been done by others.

      Interesting riff on professionalism in this whole paragraph.