9 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. what is just in time learning: build an engagement engine This article helps professional developers strategize about the use of just in time learning. Some of the tips are unsurprising while others offer new ideas. It is a quick read and useful for ideas for professional developers. rating 5/5

    1. 8 unexpected benefits of microlearning online training libraries While I am not sure that the benefits are unexpected, this does provide a list of advantages for employee driven voluntary professional development that happens via mobile devices in small doses. The usability of the page is satisfactory. rating 4/5

    1. informal learning with mobile devices - microblogging as learning resource This article uses the work of Schon, a theorist on learning and reflection whose work is often used to address workplace learning. The paper is on topic, relating to informal learning with mobile devices, but it focuses on high school students--which seems to be a rather unusual use of Schon's writing. Also the writing itself is both general and dated. There is a 2x2 that describes the relationship of formal and informal learning to intentional and unintentional learning as well as the use of devices. rating 1/5

    1. This is a scholarly article about mhealth (mobile health) which is a way to bring about health-related learning via mobile devices (or even wearable devices) in bite-sized ways. I am not qualified to evaluate the article but this does appear to be solid as far as I can tell. rating 4/5

  2. Jul 2018
  3. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and anger.

      Precisely allocated alliteration! The rhythm of this sentence is so beautiful! The act of 'driven' by vanity corresponds to 'anguish', and derision by the same thing corresponds accordingly to 'anger'. I wonder if there are more of this kind of usage in Joyce's novels.

  4. Mar 2017
  5. Feb 2017
  6. May 2016
  7. Oct 2013
    1. Compared with those of others, the speeches of professional writers sound thin in actual contests. Those of the orators, on the other hand, are good to hear spoken, but look amateurish enough when they pass into the hands of a reader. This is just because they are so well suited for an actual tussle, and therefore contain many dramatic touches, which, being robbed of all dramatic rendering, fail to do their own proper work, and consequently look silly. Thus strings of unconnected words, and constant repetitions of words and phrases, are very properly condemned in written speeches: but not in spoken speeches -- speakers use them freely, for they have a dramatic effect. In this repetition there must be variety of tone, paving the way, as it were, to dramatic effect;

      Spoken vs written word. They have different applications. Repetition is condemned in written speeches but not in oral.