118 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. The main point here is that white men are at the advantage when traditional student evaluations are used. So, the University of Southern California will no longer use them in P&T decisions.

    2. The main point here is that white men are at the advantage when traditional student evaluations are used. So, the University of Southern California will no longer use them in P&T decisions.

    1. Student evaluations of teaching are not valid and should not be used in personnel decisions. That, simply, is the point of this article.

    2. Student evaluations of teaching are not valid and should not be used in personnel decisions. That, simply, is the point of this article.

    1. There is the suggestion here that student evaluations may not evaluate what they propose to measure. That is not exactly new information. This university does use them, though, and argues that they can be a source of faculty evaluation. Note that this is a university that is making the argument.

    1. The American Association of University Professors commissioned a survey that garnered over 9,000 responses. The use of student evaluations alone is not recommended. There are complaints of 'bullying' and also complaints of low response rates. They too recommend numerous data sources that could include (their words) peer review, classroom visits, and teaching portfolios.

    1. Here is another argument in the Chronicle that student ratings should not be used exclusively and that a holistic assessment that includes observation should be used. This is important because it comes from the Chronicle.

    1. Here is an op ed piece in the Chronicle in which they report on the results of a survey they commissioned. The argument is that student evaluations are heavily relied upon to the detriment of students and teachers alike.

    1. Here you can see that observations are available but seem optional at Vanderbilt. Survey style student evaluations appear routine.

    1. The main point of this is that there is a bulleted list of items on which teaching can be judged. See page 102. Examples are whether the instructor asks interesting and challenging questions. These are not items that we used to use.

    2. This book suggests (on page 84) that observing teaching can increase the teaching skill of the observer which constitutes another argument for the benefit to the university of observations.

    1. The main point here is that one form of teacher evaluation is by the use of trained observers. It is not clear who these people are but apparently they are NOT faculty in the same content area BECAUSE faculty within the same subject area tend to focus on content rather than teaching practices.

    1. This page advocates for a "thoughtful and holistic approach" that includes "self-assessment," "peer review," and student evaluations. The point is that peer review has a place in the process, includng for P&T.

    1. The key piece of information here is that instructors themselves can collect some of the information. So can colleagues.

    1. The key point on this page is that "the most important consideration in teaching evaluation, both for improvement purposes and for personnel decisions, is the use of multiple methods of teaching evaluation using multiple sources of of data.

  2. Mar 2019
    1. 25 examples of mobile teaching This is a brief page that is cluttered with some irrelevant content that occurs in the form of rather large graphics. It is oriented toward higher education environments though the ideas would be quite easy to implement in other contexts, such as for training adult learners. The text is not in depth enough to be tremendously helpful but this resource does nonetheless make a contribution not made by other resources in that it shows actual teaching techniques. rating 4/5

    1. A context aware personalize M-learning application based on m-learning preferences This is a scholarly paper presented in the context of engineering and is not readily accessible by the layperson; it is also dated. Nonetheless it includes some scenarios and recommendations for consideration of learner preferences. It is included in this list solely because it introduces the concept of context aware personalized mobile learning. rating 1/5

    1. Top ten benefits of personalization of e-learning The text that addresses this question is toward the bottom of the page. These include increased ROI (a rationale for this is not presented).It is an enumerated list with sufficient readability and usability although the viewer does have to scroll past less relevant information to get to the list. rating 3/5

    1. 2018 mobile learning This is a Pinterest style presentation of various posts related to mobile learning and its advantages. It relates primarily to adult learning and also includes information about trends and apps. It is neatly presented. rating 5/5

    1. The benefits of personalized learning through technology This resource is included in part because it connects personalized learning and technology. A brief list of benefits, such as increasing student engagement and bridging the gap between teachers and students, are listed. This is presented by a marketing unit of a university so there may be an agenda. Nonetheless it provides useful considerations such as helping learners develop 'design thinking.' rating 3/5

    1. learning in the 21st century mobile devices + social media = personalized learning This appears to be oriented toward K-12 students but several components seem applicable to professional learning. The context is schools. Key findings are listed at the beginning of the report. The report is somewhat dated but still makes some points worth considering, such as the potential for devices to serve as a distraction just as much as a tool. rating 2/5

    1. What's possible with personalized learning: an overview of personalized learning for schools, families, and communities. This 32 page PDF is included in part due to its credibility and also to its breadth. The focus is personalized learning in schools. All ages are considered and there is a discussion of 'what personalized learning means for teachers.' It is sufficiently readable and rather attractively presented for a report. rating 5/5

    1. A national landscape scan of personalized learning in K-12 education in the United States This is included because it is associated with the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, among other indicators of credibility, and because it provides (as the title suggests) a portrait of the state of personalized learning in schools, addressing topics that are not addressed by other resources in this list. rating 5/5

    1. defining personalized learning This link is included because there is a degree of research-based sources behind their comments. There is an easy to read graphic that succinctly characterizes personalized learning. It is written for someone who is beginning their understanding of this type of learning and plans to implement it at a future point. rating 3/5

    1. personalize learning infographic

      This is not quite what it sounds like. It is a Pinterest style page with links to assorted articles that relate to personalized learning, most of which are presented in an infographic. It is sufficiently useful if one has the patience to click through to the infographics. Usability is satisfactory although the top half of the page is taken up with graphics that are not directly related to the content. rating 3/5

    1. personalized learning: how does it differ from traditional learning Some of the text here is gray and it is also small, so that does not make it easy to read. Nonetheless it is an infographic about personalized learning from which a fair amount of information can e learned in a short time. rating 4/5

    1. stages of personalized learning: infographic This is here because it shows the progression of personalized learning from teacher centered to learner center to learner driven. It has other links to learn more about personalized learning. Usability for the article is adequate but less than ideal for the infographic (which nonetheless has useful information).

    1. How a non traditional approach to professional development supports personalized learning This article is on point, discussing personalized learning among teachers that can conceivably be done by mobile devices. It discusses one specific school district. While the article is presented in a reasonable manner, it lacks substance. rating 1/5

    1. 25 apps for professional development As the title suggests, this lists 25 apps for professional development. They are suited to micro and mobile learning, for the most part. In some cases, the apps seem suited to an early career employee rather than a mid career employee. There are reader comments. rating 3/5

    1. is your company embracing just in time learning This article, by shift learning (a credible if not foremost publisher) lists benefits of just in time learning. Among those are the ability to provide up to date and easily accessed information. They argue that it creates more engaged employees but do not provide data to support this argument. rating 3/5

    1. 4 tips to implement just in time learning at your organization This article is published by Udemy so it would appear to be credible. Reading is a bit difficult because of the light font and a sales orientation can be discerned. Nonetheless it does have some useful tips such as encouraging professional developers to 'redefine how you measure learning.' rating 3/5

    1. just in time teaching This article provides practice strategies by which one can use just in time teaching. This was authored for use in higher education environments but can easily be used in other settings. It appears to have practical use. rating 5/5

    1. 5 technology enabled learning trends in 2017 This article was produced by a credible publisher and is included here because it points to the need for both mobile learning and micro learning. The authors assert but do not provide data for the increasing need for microlearning. This form of learning is said to be important because it is associated with the real world. Rating 4/5

    1. Evaluation of technology enhanced learning programs for health care professionals: systematic review This article is included because it is a systematic review. It is presented in academic language. The intention is to evaluate the quality of the articles themselves, not to guide e-learning development. Criteria for evaluating articles was established in advance. The utility of the article for my purposes may be a new search term, continuous professional development. rating 2/5

    1. what is just in time learning: build an engagement engine This article helps professional developers strategize about the use of just in time learning. Some of the tips are unsurprising while others offer new ideas. It is a quick read and useful for ideas for professional developers. rating 5/5

    1. 8 unexpected benefits of microlearning online training libraries While I am not sure that the benefits are unexpected, this does provide a list of advantages for employee driven voluntary professional development that happens via mobile devices in small doses. The usability of the page is satisfactory. rating 4/5

    1. macro to micro learning: how to transform your course library This short article has limited utility because of its lack of breadth and reading is a bit difficult because of the small gray typeface. Nonetheless it is a current article that provides a few tips for those who seek to have a greater number of micro learning opportunities among their professional development offerings. rating 2/5

    1. This site includes links to brief discussions of more than 100 learning theories, some of which relate to technology enhanced learning. Those include gamification and online collaborative learning among others. Usability is adequate and this is sufficient for an introduction to the theories though not necessarily a nuanced understanding. rating 4/5

    1. mobile learning technologies for 21st century classrooms This undated article discusses mobile learning in classrooms in a nonspecific way. One of the sources is Marc Prensky, whose work has been called into question by multiple authors. The type of information provided by this article seems rather basic and a function of common sense. A few apps are discussed. rating 1/5

    1. what is the definition of mobile learning This is a brief article that explains mobile learning for a layperson (not an academic). It is described in the context of schooling. It does not necessarily relate to informal learning specifically. The advantages (such as motivation and distance) are discussed, as well as the disadvantages (such as the potential for distraction). It is adequate as a definition. rating 3/5

    1. bridging formal and informal learning through technology in the twenty first century: issues and challenges This article is in a fully online journal. It relates to schools but the learning is by students, not teachers. However, professional development is called for. The article addresses the desired topic in that it refers to social networking and other technology enabled forms of learning; however, it does not seem to be substantive enough to be tremendously helpful. rating 1/1

    1. difference between formal and informal learning This article addresses the topic it proposes to: it describes the difference between formal and informal learning and to some extent provides some advice about selecting the type. It describes by example more than by definition and seems aimed at adults. rating 1/5

    1. Factors influencing engagement in informal learning activities This article describes features that encourage informal learning among teachers. Those are: initiative, self-efficacy, love of learning, interest in the profession, commitment to professional development, a nurturing personality, and an interesting personality. One noteworthy feature is that the factors they refer to are personal in nature. This article does appear to fill a unique niche among the collection that I have found so far. rating 5/5

    1. informal learning with mobile devices - microblogging as learning resource This article uses the work of Schon, a theorist on learning and reflection whose work is often used to address workplace learning. The paper is on topic, relating to informal learning with mobile devices, but it focuses on high school students--which seems to be a rather unusual use of Schon's writing. Also the writing itself is both general and dated. There is a 2x2 that describes the relationship of formal and informal learning to intentional and unintentional learning as well as the use of devices. rating 1/5

    1. reconceptualizing learning: a review of the literature on informal learning This is an 80 page PDF that has the support of Rutgers. It is presented in the usual manner in which reports are written. Unsurprisingly the writing is clean and accessible. The role of technology in online learning is discussed.Mentoring and communities of practice are addressed. The writing is fairly general. rating 3/5

    1. Simulations and games in informal learning contexts This article seems to discuss science learning, which is not my foremost interest, but it does give an example of how informal online learning can be used to allow the learner to explore his or her own interests. It is not specific enough to be of high value but is useful as a preliminary reading that can perhaps inform search terms to use for future research. rting 2/5

    1. This is a discussion of informal learning that focuses on ensuring that incidences of informal learning are recognized. This discussion portrays it has happening through casual conversations, online discussions, or social media. The page is easy enough to read though it does not try to be comprehensive. rating 2/5

    1. Using mobile devices to support formal, informal, and semi-formal learning: uses and implications for teaching and learning This online article is presented with 'draft' stamped across it; it does not appear to be from a recognized publisher. The content does connect the topics I am looking for (informal or personalized learning, mobile devices, and teacher professional development). They discuss their recommendations and connect informal mobile learning to personalized learning. rating 4/5

    1. The cutting edge of informal learning: makers, mobile, and more. This article discusses the features of informal learning and also discuss how it can be 'meaningful' and engaging. Constructivism and constructionism are mentioned though not at length. This may be useful given the limited resources I have but it is not one of the more impressive journal articles I have seen. rating 3/3

    1. designing for sustainable mobile learning: evaluating the concepts formal and informal This is a journal article that is freely available online. They argue that informal learning is more 'enriching' than formal learning. They write about mLearning (mobile learning) and state that some 'design aspects' must be left to learners. This is formatted in the standard way and has the usability one would expect of an online journal article. There are citations as one would expect but I am not qualified to evaluate the information quality. rating 5/5

    1. This is a dated online journal article about the use of mobile learning for teachers. The authors interviewed participants. The authors argue that mobile learning can contribute to professional learning yet this article does not seem to have multiple well-supported findings. rating 3/5

    1. This online journal article is a reflective piece about mobile learning for teachers. It appears to be connected to the work of Argyris and Schon (reflection in action) and it appears that they argue that adoption of mobile learning for teachers is not occurring at a fast pace. While disappointing, the article appears useful. rating 5/5

    1. personalized mobile learning solutions to create effective learning paths This appears to blend personalized learning and mobile learning. It is prepared by a specific vendor, MagicBox, so they might be assumed to have their own agenda. This page describes some of the affordances of personalized mobile learning, such as the capacity to track and presumably respond to learner preferences. rating 2/5

    1. This site explains the features that instructional designers or others would integrate with personalized design. Based on a graphic, it may have been meant for K-12 students, but appears applicable to other forms of learning as well. This appears to be more credible and more informative than other pages I have found so far. rating 4/5

    1. This page is meant to demonstrate what personalized learning 'looks like' and that seems to mean the principles or characteristics that it has. This page relates to kids, not adults, but the principles mostly seem relevant to adults just as much as kids. I do not know enough about this topic to evaluate the information quality, but the aspects I can evaluate, such as the writing and presentation, seem to suggest at least moderate credibility. rating 2/5

    1. This blends a discussion of professional development and personalized learning. This relates to the professional development of teachers, which I think I will shift my focus to since I am not finding public health education resources as I had hoped. This page discusses underlying cultural or other practices that contribute to professional development of this type. rating 2/5

    1. This is a research based report (of which I have found few) that connects professional development and personalized learning. I had hoped to find links that applied to health care and have not found a great many so far, but this article, which is more oriented toward professional development for teachers, still has applications since public health education professionals participate in many of the same practices. rating; 5/5

    1. I am not familiar with the sponsor, Capterra. This page describes what they consider the best e-learning apps for business. The article seems to have credible citations (such as Gartner). I notice that some of the apps may be limited to individuals whose organizations use a particular LMS. rating 3/5

    1. train and develop your staff with mobile apps I am not sure why the first two components of this page are included, but there is a bulleted list of contexts or applications of mobile apps for e-learning, such as leadership training, onboarding, and integrating interns who are part of the organization. This is interesting but I do not yet know how essential it is.

    1. This is a list of different types of mobile learning software. It seems that different categories are included, such as LMSs. I can't evaluate the products but I will note that this list would be far more helpful if they clarified what each of the software tools is supposed to do. At this point, I do not have competing lists, so I will include it for now. rating 1/5

    1. 10 awesome ways to use mobile learning for employee training This is an article about strategies and applications of mobile learning for employee development. A number of ideas are presented. I lack the knowledge base to evaluate the soundness, novelty, etc. of these ideas. There are screen shots and they are interesting enough but give only a limited idea of the concept being discussed. rating 3/5

    1. This is a round-up article that describes four apps that employees can use for mobile learning. The apps are Udemy, Skill Pill, Designjot, and BoostHQ. It is not appropriate for me to evaluate the information quality; however, this particular source (eLearning industry) generally produces accurate articles. rating 4/5

    1. Using Just in Time Training for Active Learning in The Workplace

      This does not necessarily seem to be of top quality but it is the only item I have found so far that addresses just in time training specifically within healthcare. It does not do so in great depth. It does briefly address technology and mobile learning but not in a way that is tremendously insightful. rating 2/2

    1. Time Training (and the Best Practices

      What is just in time training This is an introductory and brief article that relates to just in time training. It describes the conditions needed to bring about adoption of this process. I am not in a position to evaluate the content but the ideas seem useful. rating 4/5

    1. This article explains just in time learning (such as that which can be done via devices) within the context of higher education. My interest is in public health education, but at this moment, I am not sure how much I can narrow in on that topic, so I will save this for now. This is obviously not a scholarly article but is of some interest nonetheless. rating 2/5

    1. This is a scholarly article about mhealth (mobile health) which is a way to bring about health-related learning via mobile devices (or even wearable devices) in bite-sized ways. I am not qualified to evaluate the article but this does appear to be solid as far as I can tell. rating 4/5

    1. 10 microlearning activities to add to your e-learning library These are brief activities that learners can engage in. I am not in a position to evaluate whether these are solid but they are well presented and do offer ideas. rating 4/5

    1. microlearning This app, edume, is supposed to help people with microlearning. Apparently it is endorsed by large companies. At this point, I do not have the background to assess the product but am saving it for my own use later. rating 3/5

    1. classroom assessment techniques These are quick ways to complete formative assessment during a class session. The results can help the instructor determine what he or she should address. it can unearth learner misconceptions. These were designed for college classrooms but can be used in other adult learning contexts. rating 4/5

    1. Gagne's nine events of instruction I am including this page for myself because it is a nice reference back to Gagne's nine events and it gives both an example of each of the events as well as a list of four essential principles. It also includes some of his book titles. rating 4/5

    1. This is specific to Articulate Rise 360 (a rapid development tool) and features brief posts that keep the reader up to date on software changes, which are made frequently. Only a portion of each comment is visible on the main page (just as only a portion of an email is visible without clicking the email) but the subject heading is usually sufficient to describe the content of the post. rating 3/5

    1. This is associated with the e-learning development tool "Articulate Storyline." There are frequent blog posts and they are not limited to or exclusive to the Articulate products. Posts are brief and not all of the content will be new, but there are worthwhile tips to be had and they combine theory (not to the extent that an academic would) with practice. rating 3/5

    1. Edward Thorndike's three laws of learning. The page does not explain this, but his theories came out in about 1900. His three laws of learning appear to be relevant to our course work. This simple page features black text on a white page. It is brief and it simply describes the three laws of learning. rating 5/5

    1. Jack Phillips and ROI. This page describes the Phillips Return on Investment model. The model as presented here is an alternative to Kirkpatrick's model. There's a bulleted list of the components of the model as well as a nice graphic that briefly describes the levels. There is an explanation about how to apply the model, though I think more information would be needed for real world practice. Rating 4/5

    1. This page enables one to download the book "How People Learn" for free and allows one to link to related content. This book was not originally written for adult learning but is included here because it is a valuable resource, an entire book provided for free, with immediate relevance to adult learning even if every example, etc. is not based on adult learning. Rating 4/5

  3. www.training-games.com www.training-games.com
    1. This six-page PDF includes a list of 40 icebreakers that can be used to help learners get to know each other at the beginning of a session. Items included in this list are largely relevant to face-to-face training. The explanations are brief and may help visitors come up with their own ideas. Rating 2/5

    1. Shneiderman's eight golden rules of interface design This is a simple page that lists and briefly explains the eight golden rules of interface design. The rules are quite useful when designing interfaces and the explanation provided here is sufficient to enable the visitor to use the principles. Rating 5/5

    1. This is Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive objectives. I selected this page because it explains both the old and new versions of the taxonomy. When writing instructional objectives for adult learning and training, one should identify the level of learning in Blooms that is needed. This is not the most attractive presentation but it is one of the more thorough ones. rating 4/5

    1. Participate in eLearning Learning

      This page is set up like a Pinterest page. There are changing (not necessarily completely current) articles on various aspects of e-learning for adults. The page is laid out in a sufficiently attractive manner and the page seems relevant to those who are training adult learners. This is not the best site to visit if one has a specific need in mind but could be used well by someone who has a few minutes and wants to browse. Rating 3/5

    1. This page, Top Tools for Learning, is updated every year. It lists and briefly describes the top tech tools for adult learning. For the current (2018) list, they are YouTube, PowerPoint, and Google Search. The list proceeds through the top 200 and there are links to each tool. The purpose of this page is to list them; tutorials, etc. are not offered. Rating 4/5

    1. New Media Consortium Horizon Report This page provides a link to the annual Horizon Report. The report becomes available late in the year. The report identifies emerging technologies that are likely to be influential and describes the timeline and prospective impact for each. Unlike the link to top learning tools that anyone can use, the technologies listed here may be beyond the ability of the average trainer to implement. While it is informative and perhaps a good idea to stay abreast of these listings, it is not necessarily something that the average instructional designer can apply. Rating: 3/5

    1. 7 things you should know about This page offers two lists of technologies. One relates to learning technologies and the other to campus IT. In either case, one clicks "see all" and is shown a list of many up and coming technologies. One can click the links to get a discussion of seven things the user should know about these technologies. Reports are two pages and follow a set format that includes a brief story or illustration. These introduce the visitor to the use of the technology but do not provide extensive explanation; it is an introduction. Technologies listed on these pages are often but not always technologies that the average instructional designer may put to use. Rating: 3/5

    1. Campus Technology magazine This is the website for a magazine that is also published on paper. Articles are freely accessible (a subscription is not required). The design of the page is messy and as with any magazine, the content varies, but the site does give a description of the use of technology in higher education. The same technologies can sometimes be applied in adult learning in general. Rating 4/5

    1. ISPI offers a variety of publications, from its member-exclusive monthly and quarterly journals, "Performance Improvement Journal and Performance Improvement Quarterly,"

      International Society for Performance Improvement This is the web page of the professional association. It is similar to other professional association web pages. Some content is available only to those with a membership; individuals must log in. There are links to the publications. These include Performance Improvement Journal, Performance Improvement Quarterly, Performance Xpress. Some features of the website can become a bit difficult to drill down to but there are sometimes job aids and other immediately usable content available. This topic relates to shaping performance of adult employees on the job. Rating: 4/5

    1. Behavior Engineering Model This page has a design that is not especially attractive or user friendly but it does provide an overview of Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model. This is a model that can be used to analyze the issues that underlie performance. A six-cell model is presented. Rating 5/5

    1. Human Performance Technology Model This page is an eight page PDF that gives an overview of the human performance technology model. This is a black and white PDF that is simply written and is accessible to the layperson. Authors are prominent writers in the field of performance technology. Rating 5/5

    1. This plain page incorporates an overview of job aids by Allison Rossett, who is the foremost authority on the topic. Not all information is given away for free as she wants to sell her books, which are also promoted on the page. This page can be a good way of tracking her current work. Rating 3/5

    1. This link is to a three-page PDF that describes Gagne's nine events of instruction, largely in in the form of a graphic. Text is minimized and descriptive text is color coded so it is easy to find underneath the graphic at the top. The layout is simple and easy to follow. A general description of Gagne's work is not part of this page. While this particular presentation does not have personal appeal to me, it is included here due to the quality of the page and because the presentation is more user friendly than most. Rating 4/5

    1. This page is a simply presented list of many learning theories, both popular and less well known. The layout is clean. The pages to which the listed items link are somewhat minimal in nature so this would give a basic tour or overview of the models and would allow viewers to review the names of some of the learning theories. This page does not prioritize learning theories or identify and establish those theories that are the most prominent.

    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

    1. This is one of many discussions of Kirkpatrick's four levels of evaluation. More of the page is taken up with decoration and graphics than needs to be the case but this page is included in this list because it offers a printable guide and because the hierarchy of the four levels is clearly shown. The text itself is printed in black on a white background and it is presented as a bulleted list (the bullets are not organized as well as they could be). Nonetheless it is a usable presentation of this model. rating 3/5

    1. This page is not necessarily attractive to look at but it is a thorough presentation of various features of infographics. Features are organized by topic and generally presented as a bulleted list. The focus of the page is how to use infographics for assessment; however, the page is useful to those who wish to learn how to create infographics and to identify the software tools that can be used to create them easily. Rating 4/5

    1. This link is for the Association of Information Science and Technology. While many of the resources are available only to those who are association members, there are a great many resources to be found via this site. Among the items available are their newsletter and their journal articles. As the title suggests, there is a technology focus, and also a focus on scientific findings that can guide instructional designers in the presentation and display of visual and textual information, often but not exclusively online. Instructional designers are specifically addressed via the content of this site. A student membership is available. Rating 5/5

    1. This page offers general guidelines for facilitating class discussions. It is written for college environments and in usable in adult learning and training settings also. The presentation is straightforward but the content is not in depth. Part of the value of the page is links on the left side that address other teaching topics related to course design and course management. Rating 2/2

    1. quick and dirty usability testing

      This page has an irritating pop-up ad as well as quite a bit of images that surround the text. Nonetheless, it offers tips and techniques for making sure that usability testing gets done at some level and can be done by the average person who may not have time, money, or a lab. Rating 2/5

    1. UDL guidelines. As I post this, I do not know whether this website will be included in our future course readings or not. This website practices what it preaches and provides the same content in multiple forms. The viewer can select/choose the manner in which items are displayed. This has essential information, such as the need to provide "multiple means" of engagement, representation, action, and expression when teaching. Rating 5/5

    1. The Myers Briggs Type Indicator can be one way to learn about oneself as a student or teacher and can be a way to help teachers consider how they should present information so as to reach learners of all types (and/or how they should be careful to present information for types other than their own). This is the main site; others can be found that focus specifically on education, but I thought their own site should be featured. Rating 3/5

  4. webstandards.hhs.gov webstandards.hhs.gov
    1. Usability guidelines This site seems a bit dated in its appearance but still provides the user the opportunity to review usability standards in general, together with a rating of the weight of evidence that supports each assertion. It would take some time to go through all the information available on this site. It is also usable enough that a designer can check up on guidelines while in the middle of designing a specific project. Rating 3/5

    1. what is plain language This government site describes the rationale for plain language and more importantly provides some tools for using it. Plain language can be useful when writing text for e-learning products, among other things; this is a useful site to review. There is a list of resources as well. rating 4/5

    1. teachthought This particular page is entitled '20 simple assessment strategies you can use every day' but the reason it is listed here is because the page itself serves as a jumping off point for reviewing or learning about many educational theories and principles. This site may have been designed for K-12 teachers - I am not sure, but it is quite usable for those who teach adults. This is a place to come if you are interested in browsing - not if you have a specific thing you need at the moment. Rating 3/5

    1. This 69 page PDF offers good advice on writing a variety of types of test questions. It is called "Is this a trick question?" Despite the length of the PDF, it is easy to browse if you are interested in writing a specific type of question. As may be suggested by the length, this resource is more comprehensive than others. Rating 5/5

    1. This is one of many pages that lists verbs at various levels of Bloom's old taxonomy (verb lists for the new version are easy to find as well). This one has green bars across the page so may not be best for those who are trying to preserve ink though it is easy and attractive to use if referring to it on the screen. Rating 4/5

  5. www.pblworks.org www.pblworks.org
    1. project based learning While project based learning is more frequently used with children than adults, it can be useful for limited-time instruction for adults. This is a user friendly page that provides a decent description of project based learning and also discusses the design elements and teaching practices that should be used. rating 4/5

    1. problem based learning This gives a brief overview of problem based learning. This is a teaching method in which learners receive an ill structured problem that they continue to define and then solve. This web page serves as an overview but if one were teaching with this approach, more information would be needed than is contained on the typical introductory web page. Rating 3/5

    1. This is better than the problem-based learning page I already posted so I will post this one too. it is easy to read and gives the instructional designer or teacher a quick and better-than-average explanation about problem based learning, which is a method of teaching in which learners form teams and learn through solving real problems. rating 4/5

    1. This page describes a method of teaching designed specifically for adults. The instructional design theory is Keller's "ARCS," which stands for attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction--all features that adult learning experiences should be characterized by. The text on this page is readable but the popups and graphics are a bit annoying. rating 3/5

  6. elearningindustry.com elearningindustry.com