49 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. Welcome to AAACE The mission of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE) is to provide leadership for the field of adult and continuing education by expanding opportunities for adult growth and development; unifying adult educators; fostering the development and dissemination of theory, research, information, and best practices; promoting identity and standards for the profession; and advocating relevant public policy and social change initiatives.

      This is the website of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education. This website offers information on the annual conference, as well as online journals and scholarly publications. There is information about membership. Rating 3/5 The site does not contain a great deal of information but it seems important to include a professional association in this set of links.

  2. Jan 2019
    1. Looking at some of those bullet journal masterpieces made me wonder, how much of bullet journaling is just...productivity porn?

      How many times have I thought this myself?

      My bullet journal has to be the most spartan and utilitarian book of lists ever created.

  3. Jun 2018
    1. Figure 9. Constraint plots

      This is another example of a form of online data we support for our authors. In this case the 83 objects analyzed in this paper each had graphical representations of the model fits. All 83 elements can be viewed in the online journal via a filmstrip UI element. Readers can read individual captions for each element, download individual plots, or the entire set.

    2. Only a portion of this table is shown here to demonstrate its form and content. A machine-readable version of the full table is available.

      This is an example of one of the Journal's machine readable tables. The reader clicks from the a shortened "example" version of the table inline to the main article to an ASCII text file that they can download and reuse. One of the Journal's data editors built this full ASCII text file from data provided by the author. This process includes standardizing formats, units and column explanations, which are all proofed by the author after the paper has been accepted.

    3. Our posterior samples are available online (10.5281/zenodo.162965).

      This is an example of our current data linking markup. Data links are inline to the text through a parenthetical anchored link to the DOI resource.

      There is a bug in the current version of the article. Our formal practice is to include this in the "Article Data" tab, which didn't happen this time. We will have to do some more work standardizing our production practices. We are also still thinking about how best to markup the anchored text.

      We have not yet adopted a formal XML schema for including data links. We are working on this, which may be made easier when we adopt the most recent JATS schema.

    1. Acero F., Ackermann M., Ajello M. et al (Fermi-LAT) 2015 arXiv:1501.02003Preprint

      Starting in 2014-2015, AAS/IOP started linking to preprints in reference lists if they were the version cited by the author and an accepted manuscript did not at that time exist.

      Thus we now have built in "categories" for references, which could be expanded to include data/software sections.

    2. The most up-to-date version of the open-source package NPTFit may be found at https://github.com/bsafdi/NPTFit and the latest documentation at http://nptfit.readthedocs.io. In addition, the version used in this paper has been archived at https://zenodo.org/record/380469#.WN_pSFPyvMV.

      This is an example of incorrect software citation per the AAS Journal's policy. The Zenodo metadata should have been added to the reference list as a 1st class citation.

      It is also an example of an incorrectly typeset URL. URLs that come from DOIs should be typeset using the DOI string not the resolved URL. It should have read, "version used in this paper has been archived at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.380469"

    3. Foreman-Mackey D., Vousden W., Price-Whelan A. et al 2016 corner.py: corner.py v2.0.0, doi:10.5281/zenodo.53155

      corner.py is one of the more interesting examples of software citations. there are at least 3 different formal references in the wild:

      https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.11020 https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.53155 https://doi.org/10.21105/joss.00024

      with different versions and author lists.

    1. Barbary K. 2014 sncosmo Zenodo, 10.5281/zenodo.11938

      This software citation losts its version information. We will have to work on our typsetting and production rules, as well as develop formal JATS/NLM XML schema to contain versioning information.

    2. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.11938

      This DOI software archive is also in the Reference list per our Journal's software policy.

    3. The catalog of fakes used to generate the efficiency grids in Section 3 are available in a persistent directory: doi:10.5258/SOTON/D0030.

      This is the dataset related to this article. It contains reproducibility and reusable data for readers.

      Our "article data" tab is suppose to show this entry, but the article data tab is currently linked to the wrong DOI (the Zenodo one highlighted below).

      We do not yet submit this type of data citation as CrossRef metadata. We are still discussing how data citations should appear and be acknowledged in the text.

    4. Software: hotpants, PostgreSQL, realbogus (Bloom et al. 2012) scamp (Bertin 2006), sextractor (Bertin & Arnouts 1996), sncosmo (Barbary 2014), swarp (Bertin et al. 2002), matplotlib (Hunter 2007), numpy (Van Der Walt et al. 2011).

      The AASJournals now highlight software using a paragraph trailing the acknowledgements that lists all software used in the paper's analysis. The software doesn't need to be mentioned in the main text; context-free mentions can be placed here.

      The format is a 2 item tuple containing the short/common name of the software, and a citation or URL for the software.

      In principle this section could be data mined. At the moment it is just a free paragraph in the XML, but could be given more explicit markup to aide in data mining reuse and indexing.

    1. 1- 13 A13 --- Planet Planet 15- 15 I1 --- robust Robust flag (1) 17- 23 F7.3 d Per Orbital period 25- 28 F4.1 Rgeo Rad Planet radius 30- 33 F4.2 Rgeo E_Rad 1{sigma} upper error bound on Rad 35- 38 F4.2 Rgeo e_Rad 1{sigma} lower error bound on Rad 40- 40 A1 --- r_Rad Source of planet-star radius ratio (2) 42- 44 F3.1 solMass Mstar Mass of host star 46- 49 F4.2 solMass E_Mstar 1{sigma} upper error bound on Mstar 51- 54 F4.2 solMass e_Mstar 1{sigma} lower error bound on Mstar 56- 56 I1 --- l_Md Md upper limit flag (3) 58- 63 F6.2 Mgeo Md Planet mass from default prior 65- 69 F5.2 Mgeo E_Md ?="" 1{sigma} upper error bound on Md 71- 74 F4.2 Mgeo e_Md ?="" 1{sigma} lower error bound on Md 76- 81 F6.2 g/cm3 rhod Planet density from default prior 83- 87 F5.2 g/cm3 E_rhod ?="" 1{sigma} upper error bound on rhod 89- 92 F4.2 g/cm3 e_rhod ?="" 1{sigma} lower error bound on rhod 94- 94 I1 --- l_Mh Mh upper limit flag (3) 96-100 F5.1 Mgeo Mh Planet mass from high mass prior 102-107 F6.2 Mgeo E_Mh ?="" 1{sigma} upper error bound on Md 109-112 F4.2 Mgeo e_Mh ?="" 1{sigma} lower error bound on Md 114-119 F6.2 g/cm3 rhoh Planet density from high mass prior 121-126 F6.2 g/cm3 E_rhoh ?="" 1{sigma} upper error bound on rhod 128-131 F4.2 g/cm3 e_rhoh ?="" 1{sigma} lower error bound on rhod 133-155 A23 --- Ref References (4)

      This is the main header block of the AAS Journal's "Machine Readable Format" for structured tables. It is based on the CDS table format, and follows their structuring rules. There are columns for the numerical format, units, labels, and explanations for each column.

    1. Software: Juypter notebook (http://jupyter.org), Jupyterlab (https://github.com/jupyterlab), VOspace (http://www.canfar.net/en/docs/storage), vos (https://pypi.python.org/pypi/vos), VirtualBox (https://www.virtualbox.org), JupyterHub      (https://jupyterhub.readthedocs.io/en/latest/), ipywidgets (https://ipywidgets.readthedocs.io), NuPyCEE (http://nugrid.github.io/NuPyCEE), NuGridSetExplorer (https://github.com/NuGrid/WENDI), hdf5 (https://www.hdfgroup.org), Cyberlaboratories cyberhubs (https://github.com/cyberlaboratories/cyberhubs), Cyberlaboratories astrohubs        (https://github.com/cyberlaboratories/astrohubs), Cyberhubs Docker repository (https://hub.docker.com/u/cyberhubs), Docker (https://www.docker.com), NOAO data lab (http://datalab.noao.edu), ansible (https://www.ansible.com), puppet (https://puppet.com), mesa_h5 (https://github.com/NuGrid/mesa_h5), Python (https://www.python.org), MESA (http://mesa.sourceforge.net), WENDI (http://wendi.nugridstars.org), OpenMP (http://www.openmp.org), MESA-SDK (http://www.astro.wisc.edu/~townsend/static.php?ref=mesasdk), MPI (https://www.open-mpi.org), gfortran (https://gcc.gnu.org/fortran), SuperLU (http://crd-legacy.lbl.gov/~xiaoye/SuperLU), OpenBLAS (http://www.openblas.net), mencoder (http://www.mplayerhq.hu).

      It would be better to see some of these going to bibliographic references instead of URLs though many of them do not list preferred citations.

  4. May 2018
  5. www.hbz.uzh.ch www.hbz.uzh.ch
    1. Um irrtümliche, durch bestehende Lizenzvereinbarungen unzulässige Abbestellungen von Zeitschriftenabonnements zu vermeiden, beschliesst die Universitätsleitung die Einführung einer zentralisierten Erwerbung von an Lizenzen gebundenen Zeitschriftenabonnements. Seit 2007 werden die bei den Instituten budgetierten Erwerbungsmittel wichtiger Grossverlage bei der HBZ zentralisiert und die Abonnements zentral verwaltet.

      Gerade bei den grossen Verlagen wird der elektronische Zugang seit über zehn Jahren zentral verwaltet.

  6. Oct 2017
    1. Woodend, Jon, Maisha M. Syeda, Britney M. Paris, Gina Ko, Konstantinos Chondros, Brianna Hilman, and Teresa Fowler. 2017. “HOW CAN GRADUATE STUDENTS CONTRIBUTE? REFLECTIONS ON CREATING A JOURNAL FOR AND BY GRADUATE STUDENTS.” In Selected Proceedings of the IDEAS Conference 2017 Leading Educational Change, 75. https://prism.ucalgary.ca/bitstream/1880/52114/1/How%20can%20Graduate%20Students%20Contribute_%20Reflections%20on%20Creating%20a%20Journal%20for%20and%20by%20Graduate%20Students.pdf.

  7. Apr 2017
    1. The Initiative for Open Citations I4OC is a collaboration between scholarly publishers, researchers, and other interested parties to promote the unrestricted availability of scholarly citation data.

      https://twitter.com/i4oc_org

    1. The letters that were exchanged among the membership of the Royal Society in the mid-17th century, and that were later gathered into journals, gradually accrued formalized processes of review, editing, production, and distribution. In creating this new product —the scholarly journal—learned societies found one part of the financial model that would allow them to serve their larger goals. Scholars were encouraged to join and maintain their memberships in order to receive the journal. In addition to memberships made available to individuals, journal subscriptions were created for libraries, allowing academic institutions to help support the organizations that facilitated, validated, and circulated the work of their faculty members.

      History of journals from letters

  8. Aug 2016
    1. Page 2

      Borgman on the responsibility of rears to assess reliability and the ability of content creators to have control over their work:

      these are exciting and confusing times for scholarship. The proliferation of digital content allows new questions to be asked in new ways, but also results unduplication and dispersion. Authors can disseminate their work more widely by posting online, but readers have the additional responsibility of assessing trust and authenticity. Changes in intellectual property laws give Pharmacontrol to the creators of digital content that was available for printed comment, but the resulting business models often constrain access to scholarly resources. Students acquire an insatiable appetite for digital publications, and then find an graduation that they can barely sample them without institutional affiliations.

  9. Jul 2016
    1. Figure 3 illustrates at what age ceased ‘indie’ journals stopped publishing. Most journals survived the first 2–5 years period, whereas the mortality rate rose in the critical 6–9 years period. After that, the number of journals ceasing dropped sharply, indicating that the surviving journals had found stability.

      Most critical period for journals is 6-9 years. After year ten, the number of journals that stop drops quickly

    2. The development over time of active ‘indie’ OA journals before and after 2002 is shown in Figs. 1A and 1B. A journal was counted as ‘active’ in a particular year if it was still publishing articles in that year. Before 2002 the number of active journals grew very rapidly from a total of 76 journals in 1995 to 207 journals in 2002. The year 2002 was the cut-off year to be included in the studied cohort, meaning that no new journals were added to the data set after this point in time. After 2002, the number of journals in the cohort decreased steadily to the 127 that stayed active in 2014.

      Interesting charts showing the rise and then decline of independent, scholar-published OA journals

    3. The average number of articles published was 31 per year with 74% publishing 0–30 articles, and 9% 60 or more. The study also contains interesting data about the workload done, revenues etc.

      Average numbers of articles in OJS journals: 31

      • 74% publish 0-30
      • 9% 60 or more
    4. “The key question for OA publishing is whether it can be scaled up from a single journal publishing model with relatively few articles published per year to a comprehensive major journal with of the order of 50–100 articles annually.” They further note: “The continuation of the journal relies very heavily on the personal involvement of the editor and is as such a risk to the model. Employing staff to handle, for example, management, layout and copyediting tasks, is a cost-increasing factor that also is a threat to the model.” Both questions are still highly relevant today.

      Key issues facing scholar-published journals: can they ramp up; can they survive succession.

    5. Often the enthusiasm of the founders and their personal network can carry a volunteer-based journal for a few years. But at that same time this type of journal, which lack the support of employed staff and a professional publishing organization, are threatened by many dangers. The editor may change affiliation or retire, or the support of the university hosting the journal might be withdrawn. Authors may stop sending in good manuscripts and it may become more and more difficult to find motivated reviewers. Not being included in the Web of Science, and the impact factor that follows, may in the long run limit the number of submissions severely. On the positive side of the balance the emergence of open source software for publishing (i.e., Open Journals System) and cheap or free hosting services like Latin American Scielo have facilitated the technical parts of publishing.

      Problems with Scholar-published journals

    6. Open Access (OA) is nowadays increasingly being used as a business model for the publishing of scholarly peer reviewed journals, both by specialized OA publishing companies and major, predominantly subscription-based publishers. However, in the early days of the web OA journals were mainly founded by independent academics, who were dissatisfied with the predominant print and subscription paradigm and wanted to test the opportunities offered by the new medium. There is still an on-going debate about how OA journals should be operated, and the volunteer model used by many such ‘indie’ journals has been proposed as a viable alternative to the model adopted by big professional publishers where publishing activities are funded by authors paying expensive article processing charges (APCs). Our longitudinal quantitative study of 250 ‘indie’ OA journals founded prior to 2002, showed that 51% of these journals were still in operation in 2014 and that the median number of articles published per year had risen from 11 to 18 among the survivors. Of these surviving journals, only 8% had started collecting APCs. A more detailed qualitative case study of five such journals provided insights into how such journals have tried to ensure the continuity and longevity of operations.

      Abstract

    7. A longitudinal study of independent scholar-published open access journals

      Björk, Bo-Christer, Cenyu Shen, and Mikael Laakso. 2016. “A Longitudinal Study of Independent Scholar-Published Open Access Journals.” PeerJ 4 (May). peerj.com: e1990. doi:10.7717/peerj.1990.

  10. Jun 2016
  11. Apr 2016
    1. TL;DR: Patricia Hswe and I wrote an article for American Libraries and the editors added some quotes from a vendor talking about their products without telling us. We asked them to fix it and they said no.

      The article is "Special Report: Digital Humanities in Libraries", American Libraries Jan/Feb 2016, and the vendor is Gale/Cengage.

    2. In my former job, I learned that much of what we think of as “news” is actual paid advertising. Segments on local TV, articles in newspapers and magazines, and even national news has paid portions that are not always called out as such. I’ve stopped trusting a lot of reporting because of knowing how much money is probably changing hands to make those segments come to life. Part of my job was scripting and writing articles that would then be presented in “editorial” fashion — that is, without any acknowledgement of our paid placement there.
    1. The few open access journals that managed to acquire substantial prestige such as some of Public Library of Science (PLoS) journals did so mostly because of the very high prestige of founding editors, including nobel laureates. It is also the reason why simply calling for researchers to switch to open access outlets won’t work. Since careers and funding depend on the proven ability to publish in established “top journals”, researchers in general and early-career researchers in particular have strong incentives to avoid newly founded open access outlets. But there are groups of people that could make a difference: journal editors and their editorial review boards. A huge part of a journal’s reputation is effectively derived from its editors. If the whole editorial board of a prestigious journal decided to collectivley leave this journal behind and open up a new one, it’s very likely that this new journal would outperform the journal they had left behind.
  12. Feb 2016
  13. Jan 2016
    1. Scott Johnson tweeted a screen-capture of a message he received from academia.edu.

      Would you be open to paying a small fee to submit any upcoming papers to our board of editors to be considered for recommendation? You'd only be charged if your paper was recommended.

      Academia.edu founder Richard Price replied.

  14. Dec 2015
    1. Similarly, in science there exists substantial expertise making brilliant connectionsbetween concepts, but it is being conveyed in silos of English prose known as journalarticles. Every scientific journal article has a methods section, but it is almost impossibleto read a methods section and subsequently repeat the experiment—the English languageis inadequate to precisely and concisely convey what is being done.

      This issue of reproducible science is starting to be tackled but I do believe formal methods and abstractions would go along way to making sure we adhere these ideas. It is a bit like writing a program with global state vs a functionally defined program, but even worse, since you may forget to write down one little thing you did to the global state.

    1. We find ourselves at a decisive moment. This is the time to recognize that the very existence of our massive knowledge commons is an act of collective civil disobedience. It is the time to emerge from hiding and put our names behind this act of resistance. You may feel isolated, but there are many of us. The anger, desperation and fear of losing our library infrastructures, voiced across the internet, tell us that. This is the time for us custodians, being dogs, humans or cyborgs, with our names, nicknames and pseudonyms, to raise our voices. Share this letter - read it in public - leave it in the printer. Share your writing - digitize a book - upload your files. Don't let our knowledge be crushed. Care for the libraries - care for the metadata - care for the backup. Water the flowers - clean the volcanoes.
    2. In Elsevier's case against Sci-Hub and Library Genesis, the judge said: "simply making copyrighted content available for free via a foreign website, disserves the public interest"

      The copyrighted material in question is academic research, much of which is paid for by public funds. This judge is confusing "public" with "publishing companies". How much has the academic journal scam cost the public?

  15. Nov 2015
    1. With over 36 million visitors each month, the San Francisco-based platform-capitalist company Academia.edu is hugely popular with researchers. Its founder and CEO Richard Price maintains it is the ‘largest social-publishing network for scientists’, and ‘larger than all its competitors put together’. Yet posting on Academia.edu is far from being ethically and politically equivalent to using an institutional open access repository, which is how it is often understood by academics. Academia.edu’s financial rationale rests on the ability of the venture-capital-funded professional entrepreneurs who run it to monetize the data flows generated by researchers. Academia.edu can thus be seen to have a parasitical relationship to a public education system from which state funding is steadily being withdrawn.

      Includes links to related articles.

  16. Jul 2015
  17. Jun 2015
  18. Nov 2014
    1. manuscript

      Does the term "manuscript" still work for born digital and fully digital documents? Remember, there are no print editions of AAS journals as of 2015!

    2. I'm doing a collaborative annotation of this page to see if a) people want to give feedback on the utility of these instructions and b) to see if anyone wants to collaboratively annotate a document.

    3. Online-only Figures Online-only figures are intended to provide supplementary information that is not critical to the scientific content of the paper but that provides additional useful information for the reader. They are not allowed when the figures are an integral part of the paper, or simply to limit page charges. Such materials will carry a nominal publication charge depending on the number and size of the figure files, but again this will be a small fraction of the cost of printing the same volume of material. Note that online-only materials are subject to the same peer-review standards as the rest of the manuscript, and their inclusion should be justified on scientific grounds.

      This entire section has to be re-written because

      1. everything is an "online-only"figure.
      2. there is no printing.
      3. we now use "quanta" not "page charges"
    4. In the printed paper, the placement of tables will be determined by their first mention in the text.

      There is no printed version...

  19. Feb 2014
    1. National governments are also weighing in on the issue. The UK government aims this April to make text-mining for non-commercial purposes exempt from copyright, allowing academics to mine any content they have paid for.

      UK government intervening to make text-mining for non-commercial purposes exempt from copyright.

    2. “Our plan is just to wait for the copyright exemption to come into law in the United Kingdom so we can do our own content-mining our own way, on our own platform, with our own tools,” says Mounce. “Our project plans to mine Elsevier’s content, but we neither want nor need the restricted service they are announcing here.”

      This seems to be a sensible move rather than be hindered not by copyright, but by the onerous contract that Elsevier wants to put in place.

    3. some researchers feel that a dangerous precedent is being set. They argue that publishers wrongly characterize text-mining as an activity that requires extra rights to be granted by licence from a copyright holder, and they feel that computational reading should require no more permission than human reading. “The right to read is the right to mine,” says Ross Mounce of the University of Bath, UK, who is using content-mining to construct maps of species’ evolutionary relationships.

      "The right to read is the right to mine."