18 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. I used to pull stunts like this all the time as soon as tables came. Really ugly, and may seriously embarrass any validator you run it trough: overlapping table cells. Works in most browsers though and even without css.
  2. May 2021
    1. I hate to be the guy who will destroy your day but... Tables. You need to work with nested tables/cells. If you think Gmail is annoying you will cry in agony if you also need Outlook support.Work with the good old HTML from the early 2000's. That's the only way to be sure everything will work as intended.Anything else will mostly result in a horrible mess, broken design and incompatible layouts.
    1. While it’s not quite completely table-free, I’ve managed to get The Intermittent Newsletter down to a single table—one that’s not even visible to non-Microsoft email clients. Along the way, I made an effort to make The Intermittent Newsletter accessible to more readers.
  3. Jan 2021
    1. How to wrap long word (text without spaces) in html table’s cell? This is very, very easy! We must add only a CSS proprty to table cell “td” tag – “word-break: break-all;” then all column’s widths become as intended. 
    1. It is also very likely that the contents of the table might change the structure or dimensions of the table. For example, long words residing in the table cells can cause the cell width to increases. If you fix that problem, it might happen that the long words cross the cell boundaries.
  4. Sep 2020
  5. Jun 2020
  6. Jun 2018
    1. Only a portion of this table is shown here to demonstrate its form and content. A machine-readable version of the full table is available.

      This is an example of one of the Journal's machine readable tables. The reader clicks from the a shortened "example" version of the table inline to the main article to an ASCII text file that they can download and reuse. One of the Journal's data editors built this full ASCII text file from data provided by the author. This process includes standardizing formats, units and column explanations, which are all proofed by the author after the paper has been accepted.

    1. 1- 13 A13 --- Planet Planet 15- 15 I1 --- robust Robust flag (1) 17- 23 F7.3 d Per Orbital period 25- 28 F4.1 Rgeo Rad Planet radius 30- 33 F4.2 Rgeo E_Rad 1{sigma} upper error bound on Rad 35- 38 F4.2 Rgeo e_Rad 1{sigma} lower error bound on Rad 40- 40 A1 --- r_Rad Source of planet-star radius ratio (2) 42- 44 F3.1 solMass Mstar Mass of host star 46- 49 F4.2 solMass E_Mstar 1{sigma} upper error bound on Mstar 51- 54 F4.2 solMass e_Mstar 1{sigma} lower error bound on Mstar 56- 56 I1 --- l_Md Md upper limit flag (3) 58- 63 F6.2 Mgeo Md Planet mass from default prior 65- 69 F5.2 Mgeo E_Md ?="" 1{sigma} upper error bound on Md 71- 74 F4.2 Mgeo e_Md ?="" 1{sigma} lower error bound on Md 76- 81 F6.2 g/cm3 rhod Planet density from default prior 83- 87 F5.2 g/cm3 E_rhod ?="" 1{sigma} upper error bound on rhod 89- 92 F4.2 g/cm3 e_rhod ?="" 1{sigma} lower error bound on rhod 94- 94 I1 --- l_Mh Mh upper limit flag (3) 96-100 F5.1 Mgeo Mh Planet mass from high mass prior 102-107 F6.2 Mgeo E_Mh ?="" 1{sigma} upper error bound on Md 109-112 F4.2 Mgeo e_Mh ?="" 1{sigma} lower error bound on Md 114-119 F6.2 g/cm3 rhoh Planet density from high mass prior 121-126 F6.2 g/cm3 E_rhoh ?="" 1{sigma} upper error bound on rhod 128-131 F4.2 g/cm3 e_rhoh ?="" 1{sigma} lower error bound on rhod 133-155 A23 --- Ref References (4)

      This is the main header block of the AAS Journal's "Machine Readable Format" for structured tables. It is based on the CDS table format, and follows their structuring rules. There are columns for the numerical format, units, labels, and explanations for each column.

  7. Dec 2017
  8. Jul 2015
    1. I think it is possibly too early to tell.

      As Steven Hill of HEFCE recently suggested, it might be far better for UK institutions to reject these tables: "What if all UK institutions made a stand against global rankings, and stopped using them for promotional purposes? The reputation of the UK’s higher education sector would stand firm, and a really strong signal would be sent to the rest of the world. Not drifting, but steering purposely through the metric tide." http://blog.hefce.ac.uk/2015/07/08/the-metrics-dilemma/