31 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2023
    1. https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/103kpxs/table_of_contents_for_heydes_technik_des/

      Table of Contents for Heyde's Technik des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens (1931)

      I've seen a copy of a version of the table of contents for Heyde's book in German, though I suspect it was from a version from the 1960s or after, though the copy I saw wasn't specified. Does anyone have a copy of the first edition that they could send me a photocopy of the table of contents for a project I'm working on? If you've got copies of later editions those might be useful/helpful as well.

      Heyde, Johannes Erich. Technik des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens: zeitgemässe Mittel und Verfahrungsweisen. Junker und Dünnhaupt, 1931.

      Thanks in advance for your help!

  2. Dec 2022
    1. Bendat, Julius S. Principles and Applications of Random Noise Theory. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1958.

      My copy of this book from 1958 has a table of contents with numberings for chapter, section, and subsections.

      Eg: 1.2-1 Constant Parameter Linear Systems

  3. Nov 2022
  4. May 2022
    1. https://x28newblog.wordpress.com/2022/05/08/curating-my-blog-archive/

      I like the overall look and effect done here to create a table of contents in WordPress, but it seems like some quirky gymnastics to pull it off. How might this be done in a more straightforward way? Are there any plugins for WordPress that could create a page that keeps the categories and the descriptions? And particularly a page that primarily only shows articles and not other content types?

      Link this to my work on my own index at https://boffosocko.com/about/index/

  5. Jan 2022
    1. Three types of linking can be distinguished:a) References in the context of a larger structural outline: When beginning a major line of thoughtLuhmann sometimes noted on the first card several of the aspects to be addressed and marked themby a capital letter that referred to a card (or set of consecutive cards) that was numbered accordinglyand placed at least in relative proximity to the card containing the outline. This structure comesclosest to resembling the outline of an article or the table of contents of a book and therefore doesn’treally use the potentials of the collection as a web of notes.b) Collective references: At the beginning of a section devoted to a specific subject area, one can oftenfind a card that refers to a number of other cards in the collection that have some connection withthe subject or concept addressed in that section. A card of this kind can list up to 25 references andwill typically specify the respective subject or concept in addition to the number. These referencescan indicate cards that are related by subject matter and in close proximity or to cards that are farapart in other sections of the collection, the latter being the normal case.c) Single references: At a particular place in a normal note Luhmann often made a reference to anothercard in the collection that was also relevant to the special argument in question; in most cases the re

      ferred card is located at an entirely different place in the file, frequently in the context of a completely different discussion or subject.

      Niklas Luhmann's index card system had three different types of links. Direct links to individual notes, outlines with links to cards (similar to tables of contents or maps of content), and what Schmidt (2018) refers to as "collective references". These collective references sound a lot like search queries for related topics that have links to a variety of resources/cards related to a particular topic and sound like a table of contents, but without a specific hierarchy.

    1. Eusebius, a historian and bishop of the coastal city of Caesarea, in Palestine, assembled Christian writings in the local library. He also devised a system of cross-references, known as “canon tables,” that enabled readers to find parallel passages in the four Gospels—a system that the scholar James O’Donnell recently described as the world’s first set of hot links.
  6. Dec 2021
    1. First, I go to existing structure notes. They are notes about notes, and therefore they map structures in my archive.

      Structure notes are notes about notes. Sounds similar to Maps of Content (MoC) or Tables of Contents in some sense. No one seems to have a strong or consistent name for this practice.

  7. Nov 2021
    1. $('#example').DataTable({ headerCallback: function headerCallback(thead, data, start, end, display) { $(thead) .find('th') .first() .html('Displaying ' + (end - start) + ' records'); } }); Note that the first parameter might actually be the first tr inside the thead, not necessarily the thead element itself, contrary to what is stated in the DataTables documentation. In complex scenarios with multiple header rows (trs), you might need to select like this: $('#example').DataTable({ headerCallback: function headerCallback(thead, data, start, end, display) { $(thead) .closest('thead') .find('th') .first() .html('Displaying ' + (end - start) + ' records'); } });

      Personalizzare le celle th di una DataTable

  8. Sep 2021
  9. Aug 2021
    1. Some thoughts about leaving space in new notebooks, especially for one's future self:

      • contact information in front in case of loss
      • space for a future table of contents to come
      • space for page numbers and dates
      • space in the back for house keeping, indices, etc.

      http://www.notesaboutnotes.com/Notes/FrontMatter.html

  10. May 2021
    1. I used to pull stunts like this all the time as soon as tables came. Really ugly, and may seriously embarrass any validator you run it trough: overlapping table cells. Works in most browsers though and even without css.
    1. I hate to be the guy who will destroy your day but... Tables. You need to work with nested tables/cells. If you think Gmail is annoying you will cry in agony if you also need Outlook support.Work with the good old HTML from the early 2000's. That's the only way to be sure everything will work as intended.Anything else will mostly result in a horrible mess, broken design and incompatible layouts.
    1. While it’s not quite completely table-free, I’ve managed to get The Intermittent Newsletter down to a single table—one that’s not even visible to non-Microsoft email clients. Along the way, I made an effort to make The Intermittent Newsletter accessible to more readers.
  11. Jan 2021
    1. How to wrap long word (text without spaces) in html table’s cell? This is very, very easy! We must add only a CSS proprty to table cell “td” tag – “word-break: break-all;” then all column’s widths become as intended. 
    1. It is also very likely that the contents of the table might change the structure or dimensions of the table. For example, long words residing in the table cells can cause the cell width to increases. If you fix that problem, it might happen that the long words cross the cell boundaries.
  12. Sep 2020
  13. Jun 2020
  14. Jun 2018
    1. Only a portion of this table is shown here to demonstrate its form and content. A machine-readable version of the full table is available.

      This is an example of one of the Journal's machine readable tables. The reader clicks from the a shortened "example" version of the table inline to the main article to an ASCII text file that they can download and reuse. One of the Journal's data editors built this full ASCII text file from data provided by the author. This process includes standardizing formats, units and column explanations, which are all proofed by the author after the paper has been accepted.

    1. 1- 13 A13 --- Planet Planet 15- 15 I1 --- robust Robust flag (1) 17- 23 F7.3 d Per Orbital period 25- 28 F4.1 Rgeo Rad Planet radius 30- 33 F4.2 Rgeo E_Rad 1{sigma} upper error bound on Rad 35- 38 F4.2 Rgeo e_Rad 1{sigma} lower error bound on Rad 40- 40 A1 --- r_Rad Source of planet-star radius ratio (2) 42- 44 F3.1 solMass Mstar Mass of host star 46- 49 F4.2 solMass E_Mstar 1{sigma} upper error bound on Mstar 51- 54 F4.2 solMass e_Mstar 1{sigma} lower error bound on Mstar 56- 56 I1 --- l_Md Md upper limit flag (3) 58- 63 F6.2 Mgeo Md Planet mass from default prior 65- 69 F5.2 Mgeo E_Md ?="" 1{sigma} upper error bound on Md 71- 74 F4.2 Mgeo e_Md ?="" 1{sigma} lower error bound on Md 76- 81 F6.2 g/cm3 rhod Planet density from default prior 83- 87 F5.2 g/cm3 E_rhod ?="" 1{sigma} upper error bound on rhod 89- 92 F4.2 g/cm3 e_rhod ?="" 1{sigma} lower error bound on rhod 94- 94 I1 --- l_Mh Mh upper limit flag (3) 96-100 F5.1 Mgeo Mh Planet mass from high mass prior 102-107 F6.2 Mgeo E_Mh ?="" 1{sigma} upper error bound on Md 109-112 F4.2 Mgeo e_Mh ?="" 1{sigma} lower error bound on Md 114-119 F6.2 g/cm3 rhoh Planet density from high mass prior 121-126 F6.2 g/cm3 E_rhoh ?="" 1{sigma} upper error bound on rhod 128-131 F4.2 g/cm3 e_rhoh ?="" 1{sigma} lower error bound on rhod 133-155 A23 --- Ref References (4)

      This is the main header block of the AAS Journal's "Machine Readable Format" for structured tables. It is based on the CDS table format, and follows their structuring rules. There are columns for the numerical format, units, labels, and explanations for each column.

  15. Dec 2017
  16. Jul 2015
    1. I think it is possibly too early to tell.

      As Steven Hill of HEFCE recently suggested, it might be far better for UK institutions to reject these tables: "What if all UK institutions made a stand against global rankings, and stopped using them for promotional purposes? The reputation of the UK’s higher education sector would stand firm, and a really strong signal would be sent to the rest of the world. Not drifting, but steering purposely through the metric tide." http://blog.hefce.ac.uk/2015/07/08/the-metrics-dilemma/