379 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. I cannot speak for the editor but I don’t see why Searchmysite would not also accept and crawl static HTML websites (ie. Retro or vintage HTML sites) so long as the site has some value and content that it can index, but they might not.

      They certainly could. I've seen the author haunting the IndieWeb chat in the past and they've mentioned that crawling and saving data can tend to be a bit on the expensive side, so they're trying to do more targeted search/save when they can. Perhaps as the project matures, it will add these sorts of functionalities.

    1. You can check out the new platform — which is essentially a short-form blog — by heading to www.DonaldJTrump.com/desk.

      Apparently he's invented the idea of a microblog? And he's got a /desk page?

      What comes next?

      But let's be honest, he was posting these short status updates like this just a few days after he got kicked off of Twitter. He's just got a slightly better UI now.

  2. May 2021
    1. all active note-takers, life-hackers, and apparently also IndieWeb-enabled bloggers!

      We really need to get around to scheduling the second session of Gardens and Streams.

    2. esterday evening, Ton Zijlstra organized the first Dutch Obsidian meetup. I didn’t really know what to expect, and in the end I’m glad I let my curiosity get the better of me, as we chatted for almost two hours on various struggles with contemporary note-taking using the relatively new note-taking player, Obsidian. Read Frank Meeuwsen’s expectations and Ton’s afterthoughts on their respective blogs (in Dutch). Together with Sebastiaan Andeweg and myself, the four of us had a great time showing each other how we tackle digital note-taking. It turned out to be a small but quirky group of like-minded people: all active note-takers, life-hackers, and apparently also IndieWeb-enabled bloggers!

      This sounds like a fun way to get together. I'm personally curious to see people taking their Obsidian data and turning them into IndieWeb-friendly linked Memexes. It's interesting to use Obsidian to have a thought conversation with one's self, but it could also be interesting if they could have conversations with each other via Webmention.

      For me the more difficult piece is not so much getting the thing online, but setting it up so that the backlinks all work properly using the [[wikilink]] syntax.

  3. Apr 2021
    1. I like how Dr. Pacheco-Vega outlines some of his research process here.

      Sharing it on Twitter is great, and so is storing a copy on his website. I do worry that it looks like the tweets are embedded via a simple URL method and not done individually, which means that if Twitter goes down or disappears, so does all of his work. Better would be to do a full blockquote embed method, so that if Twitter disappears he's got the text at least. Images would also need to be saved separately.

    1. After the recent brouhaha at Basecamp (context: https://www.platformer.news/p/-what-really-happened-at-basecamp), a great example of someone using their own domain because they didn't want the bad press of a silo/platform to stick to them

    1. Darius Kazemi randomly tweets out pages from books in the Internet Archive as a means of creating discovery and serendipity.

      Library Futures, Jennie Rose Halperin @Library_futures @little_wow

      Idea of artificial scarcity being imposed on digital objects is a damaging thing for society.

      Ideas to explore:

      Libraries as a free resource could be reframed as a human right within a community.

      Librarians as local community tummelers around information.

      Joanne McNeill

    1. This sounds tangential to the sort of idea that Greg McVerry and I have noodled around with in the past.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Darius Kazemi</span> in Darius Kazemi: "In just a couple hours I'll be speaking with @jom…" - Friend Camp (<time class='dt-published'>04/28/2021 10:19:27</time>)</cite></small>

    1. enumjorge 7 hours ago [–] Same. I was intrigued and wanted to start exploring the sites that make up this “indie web”, but the landing page doesn’t list them. Clicked on “Getting Started Now” which took me to a busy looking wiki page talking about Wordpress? Confused, I left.

      This is an intriguing question that I've seen a few different times:

      Where is the IndieWeb?

      Perhaps worth writing an essay to describe where to find some of these sites if you wanted to interact with them.

      Include

      • chat names
      • indie map lists
      • web ring

      Part of it is how you define IndieWeb. What are those potential criteria.

    1. What I like about some of the newer platforms (Ghost, Medium, Social Media platforms) is the way the default post and the menus themselves more clearly guide the user in their decisions about how to interact. There is a sense that the platform offers points of entry. Doesn’t hold the user’s hand – but welcomes them, points to stuff, and smiles at the user a bit more.

      Here's a great example of a person who wants some of the UI niceties provided by onboarding for new users. This can be incredibly important for people who are new to the platform.

      On the flip side, it's much easier to do for a social media platform like Twitter which only does one or two things. It can be far harder for platforms like WordPress which have a lot more complexity or uses and require personas or use-types to do this well.

    1. Since I’m doing that, I’m also considering whether it makes sense for me to have a substack blog as well?

      Given some of the press Substack has gotten in the past few months, I think there's more to be said for actively leaving Substack to move to WordPress or some other platform where you can use your own domain name and content.

      Congratulations on the move!

    1. DM gives you simple but/and powerful tools to mark up, annotate and link your own networked collections of digital images and texts. Mark up your image and text documents with highlights that you can then annotate and link together. Identify discreet moments on images and texts with highlight tools including dots, lines, rectangles, circles, polygons, text tags, and multiple color options. Develop your projects and publications with an unlimited number of annotations on individual highlights and entire image and text documents. Highlights and entire documents can host an unlimited number of annotations, and annotations themselves can include additional layers of annotations. Once you've marked up your text and image documents with highlights and annotations, you can create links between individual highlights and entire documents, and your links are bi-directional, so you and other viewers can travel back and forth between highlights. Three kinds of tools, entire digital worlds of possible networks and connections.

      This looks like the sort of project that @judell @dwhly @remikalir and the Hypothes.is team may appreciate, if nothing else but for the user interface set up and interactions.

      I'll have to spin up a copy shortly to take a look under the hood.

    1. I totally get where Jacy is coming from.

      It's difficult to try to be all things to all people, particularly when they have so many diverse needs/wants and there are so many options for various levels of technical expertise.

      It's like teaching algebra to a 4th grader, an 8th grader and an advanced graduate student. They all need dramatically different textbooks for their different levels of sophistication.

    1. I asked Seyal if Pinterest had ever considered a feature that let users mark a life event complete. Canceled. Finished. Done. “We would have to have a system that thinks about things on an event level, so we could deliver on the promise,” Seyal said. “Right now we just use relevance as a measure.” But had Pinterest considered that, in the long run, people might be more inclined to use the app if it could become a clean space for them when they needed it to be, a corner of the internet uncluttered with grief?

      This would be a great feature for IndieWeb creators to consider.

    1. This year’s Slow Art Day — April 10 — comes at a time when museums find themselves in vastly different circumstances.

      Idea: Implement a slow web week for the IndieWeb, perhaps to coincide with the summit at the end of the week.

      People eschew reading material from social media and only consume from websites and personal blogs for a week. The tough part is how to implement actually doing this. Many people would have a tough time finding interesting reading material in a short time. What are good discovery endpoints for that? WordPress.com's reader? Perhaps support from feed reader community?

    1. While it is work in progress, it will live on sarasoueidan.dev. So this Web site you’re on right now will still be here while the new one comes to life. Once the new site is done, it will replace this one on the dot com domain.

      This is a fun reason to have more than one website.

  4. Mar 2021
    1. The United States has no real answer to these challenges, and no wonder: We don’t have an internet based on our democratic values of openness, accountability, and respect for human rights. An online system controlled by a tiny number of secretive companies in Silicon Valley is not democratic but rather oligopolistic, even oligarchic.

      Again, a piece that nudges me to thing that a local-based IndieWeb provider/solution would be a good one. Either co-op based, journalism-based, or library-based.

    2. Americans worked together: “As soon as several of the inhabitants of the United States have conceived a sentiment or an idea that they want to produce in the world, they seek each other out; and when they have found each other, they unite.”

      The IndieWeb is very much this.

    1. @ajlkn has several related projects including this one:

      Might be an interesting experiment to make one or more of them IndieWeb friendly and create a set up to dovetail one or more of them in with the GitHub pages set up.

    1. There's been occasional talk in the IndieWeb chat about recipes that have long boring pre-stories and don't get to the point.

      This is one of the first examples I've seen of a food blog that has a "Jump to Recipe" button and a "Print Recipe" button right at the top for those who are in a hurry, or who have read the post previously.

      Will look for other examples...

    1. It comprises the collection of "mutual knowledge, mutual beliefs, and mutual assumptions" that is essential for communication between two people.

      I've seen a few people with websites that have a grouping of some of their past posts to help orient new readers into their way of thinking and understanding to help provide common grounding for new readers.

      Colin Walker is an example that has had one in the past, but it looks like the move from WordPress to his new system, the original link to that data is gone now. His page was called "required" and an archived version of his example(s) can be found archived here: https://web.archive.org/web/2020*/https://colinwalker.blog/required/

    1. the IndieWeb, a group of hipsters with websites trying to take down THE MAN (aka the “corporate web”).
    1. streak New posts for 52 consecutive weeks.

      It's kind of cool that he's got a streak counter for his posts.

    2. I want the patina of fingerprints, the quiet and comfortable background hum of a library.

      A great thing to want on a website! A tiny hint of phatic interaction amongst internet denizens.

    3. If I’m in a meeting, I should be able to share a link in the chat to a particular post on my blog, then select the paragraph I’m talking about and have it highlighted for everyone. Well, now I can.

      And you could go a few feet farther if you added fragment support to the site, then the browser would also autoscroll to that part. Then you could add a confetti cannon to the system and have the page rain down confetti when more than three people have highlighted the same section!

    1. A news co-op is a news organization owned by its readers, whose membership fees pay for open access journalism – no paywall – usually organized as nonprofits (an IRS rule-change lets for-profit newspaper convert to nonprofits).

      I'm sort of wishing that we could also have social media co-ops. I suspect that there are a few on Mastodon that operate like this, but it would be interesting to see some focused around in-person communities as well.

      Why couldn't my local library run a town/city-based social media co-op?

      For this matter, why couldn't my local news co-op also run it's own social media platform?

    1. These newsletters are the most backed up pieces of writing in history, copies in millions of inboxes, on millions of hard drives and servers, far more than any blog post. More robust than an Internet Archive container. LOCKSS to the max. These might be the most durable copies yet of ourselves. They’re everywhere but privately so, hidden, piggybacking on the most accessible, oldest networked publishing platform in the world.

      This is an interesting point about longevity of content. It's definitely a good reason to email it out as well as to post it on your own website and archive it all at the same time.

    2. If I’m writing about newsletters, let me point at some that excite and delight:

      This makes me wonder if anyone else is keeping newsletterrolls?

    3. Silence Here’s another, more subtle, point about the grace of email and newsletters: Creation and consumption don’t happen in the same space. When I go to send a missive in Campaign Monitor the world of my laptop screen is as silent as a midnight Tokyo suburb.9 I think we’ve inured ourselves to the (false) truth that in order to post something, in order to contribute something to the stream, we must look at the stream itself, “Bird Box”-esque, and woe be the person in a productive creative jag, wanting to publish, who can resist those hot political tweets.

      This rings very true to me and is a definite benefit of composing things within my own domain rather than too quickly within a social silo's interface.

    4. I try to be deliberate, and social networks seem more and more to say: You don’t know what you want, but we do. Which, to someone who, you know, gives a shit, is pretty dang insulting.

      Definitely a great reason for the IndieWeb principle of make what you need.

    5. Ownership is the critical point here. Ownership in email in the same way we own a paperback: We recognize that we (largely) control the email subscriber lists, they are portable, they are not governed by unknowable algorithmic timelines.3 And this isn’t ownership yoked to a company or piece of software operating on quarterly horizon, or even multi-year horizon, but rather to a half-century horizon. Email is a (the only?) networked publishing technology with both widespread, near universal adoption,4 and history. It is, as they say, proven.

      This is very IndieWeb in flavor.

      It reminds me of Stanley Meyer who would read newspapers and magazines every day and cut out articles which he put into envelopes for his friends and children and mailed out every couple of weeks. Essentially his own newsletter, but by snail mail.

    6. Years ago, I helped build a storytelling platform called Hi (a simplification of its original name: Hitotoki, now shuttered and archived) and one of the things I’m most proud of our team having concocted is the commenting system. We had tens of thousands of users and almost no issues with harassment. You could comment on anyone’s story and your having commented would be public — a little avatar at the bottom of the page — but the comment itself would be private. This allowed folks to reap the public validation of engagement (“Whoa! So many comments!”) while simultaneously removing any grandstanding or attacks. It wasn’t quite messaging. It wasn’t quite commenting. It felt very much like a contemporary, lighter take on email, and in being so was a joy to use. Here’s what the bottom of an entry looks like: "Commenting" on Hitotoki

      I like the design and set up for this feature. Perhaps something for the IndieWeb to pick up? In some sense the implementation of Webmention-based likes, bookmarks, and facepiled mentions on my site is just this sort of design.

      The anecdotal evidence that there was little harassment is a positive sign for creating such a thing.

    1. It's the feedback that's motivating A-list bloggers like Digg founder Kevin Rose to shut down their blogs and redirect traffic to their Google+ profiles. I have found the same to be true.

      This didn't work out too well for them did it?

    1. The only way to own my lamp was to pwn my lamp.

      Does IoT then really stand for IndieWeb of Things?

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    1. A complicated and messy essay underlining the fact that people can figure out how to use technology in off-label ways to better humanity rather than sitting back on the intended uses of these tools.

      I definitely want to reference this in my presentation part of my workshop for "A Twitter of Our Own" for OERxDomains21.

    2. And it’s tempting for engineers to think decentralising the Web can be achieved with technology. But really, it’s people who will make it happen. Rather than staying put in our little filter bubbles, we can burst out of them — and be radically sociable, delinquent, and make a scene.

      off label uses of technology are important

      I'm reminded of how Kicks Condor has appreciated my "people work" in the past.

    3. according to Hao, Mark Zuckerberg wants to increase the number of people who log into Facebook six days a week. I’m not going to get into whether this is good or bad here, but it certainly shows that what you are doing, and how you are doing it, is very important to Facebook.

      Can we leverage these data points to follow a movement like Meatless Monday to encourage people to not use Facebook two days a week to cause this data analysis to crash?

      Anything that is measured can be gamed. But there's also the issue of a moving target because Facebook will change it's target which then means the community activism will need to change it's target as well. (This may be fine if the point is community engagement and education as the overall mission, in which case the changing target continually engages people and brings in new people to consider what is happening and why.)

    4. And they are one of the reasons most digital services don’t come with a How To manual. Most of the time, we’re not expected to use them the “right” way; most of the time there is no right way, because most digital services bend to meet our needs.A

      How can the IndieWeb as a group do this piece better? Perhaps it comes down to individual sub-providers which is fine, but if the larger group can do it from the top down...

    5. Can we occupy technology with love?

      An interesting re-framing of the social media problem. Similar to the IndieWeb philosophy, but a bit more pointed.

    1. I really like this and want to figure out way to do it on my own website. It could be fun to tuck it in with the weather and location data I'm already collecting.

    1. Summary of moving from in person to online events a year ago.

      I like her admonition to consider welcoming new people to a community in an online only space.

      Try to avoid in-jokes. Make space for more phatic communication. Make considerations for parents, particularly around mealtimes and bedtimes.

    1. Ravi outlines some of how he syndicates from his Drupal website to Twitter.

      I particularly appreciated that he's using a sort of taxonomy within Drupal to add some of his particular content to "books" which aggregate related content together. If this were done in an editable outline then it should be easier to aggregate and edit later into an actual book. This would be a cool UI to have within a website for writing and creating.

    1. they have integrity, and integrity means something right now.

      How does integrity fit into the IndieWeb space? Particularly as it scales and more people depend on a small number of developers and designers.

    2. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Aram Zucker-Scharff</span> in Ernie Smith on Twitter: "You don’t need Substack. Today’s @readtedium explains how you can self-host your newsletter on the cheap: https://t.co/yp2tLBRS4a" / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>03/18/2021 23:48:57</time>)</cite></small>

    1. I just wanted a way to send out my irregularly-updated newsletter to a couple thousand subscribers without getting caught in a spam filter.

      This is the short version of what Substack is and why people want to use it.

    1. Q: So, this means you don’t value hearing from readers?A: Not at all. We engage with readers every day, and we are constantly looking for ways to hear and share the diversity of voices across New Jersey. We have built strong communities on social platforms, and readers inform our journalism daily through letters to the editor. We encourage readers to reach out to us, and our contact information is available on this How To Reach Us page.

      We have built strong communities on social platforms

      They have? Really?! I think it's more likely the social platforms have built strong communities which happen to be talking about and sharing the papers content. The paper doesn't have any content moderation or control capabilities on any of these platforms.

      Now it may be the case that there are a broader diversity of voices on those platforms over their own comments sections. This means that a small proportion of potential trolls won't drown out the signal over the noise as may happen in their comments sections online.

      If the paper is really listening on the other platforms, how are they doing it? Isn't reading some or all of it a large portion of content moderation? How do they get notifications of people mentioning them (is it only direct @mentions)?

      Couldn't/wouldn't an IndieWeb version of this help them or work better.

    1. What's more, watching the debates happening in real-time has really driven home that this approach doesn't just scale, it scales well. For a personal site, incremental improvement measured against real-world testing feels okay. For an industry-level protocol or specification, it feels like it should just collapse. Yet with the IndieWeb, not only is their work surprisingly resilient, it's far more adaptable as a result.

      think also "move slow and fix things"...

    2. The second is that their approach of allowing standards to evolve through practical application, rather than highfalutin conjecture, is an incredibly powerful technique for problem-solving. The number of my ideas that have died on paper as I try to flesh them out are beyond count. It's the Goldilocks conundrum: the feeling that something needs to be just right before other people can see it. The IndieWeb methodology proves that this logic should just be thrown away.

      It took me a while to see this too. Many report that attending law school is really just learning a different way of seeing and approaching the world. IndieWeb has been much like this for me. It provides a different and often useful framing for approaching problems, not just with regard to the web, but to life in general.

    3. the community is both endlessly creative and genuinely interested in solving big issues in meaningful ways. Whether it's their commitment to careful (and caring) community stewardship or their particular strain of techno-ethics, I have been consistently (and pleasantly) surprised at what I've seen during the last twelve months. I don't always see eye-to-eye with their decisions and I don't think that the community is perfect, but it's consistently (and deliberately) striving to be better, and that's a fairly rare thing, online or off.
    4. I've also seen a lot of people take aim at the IndieWeb for simply copying silos like Facebook. I feel like this is yet another issue with the branding; another set of people missing the point. IndieWeb tools don't aim to copy silo functionality, they just aim to let people interact with one another in the same way that they would on a silo, only using their own website. That's a fine line and I see how it can appear blurry at times, but it's also a really important one and an aspect of the IndieWeb which I find particularly compelling.

      Maybe the underlying principle of the IndieWeb here is allowing all people and websites to have equality and equity across website boundaries?

      From another perspective, websites are their own things. No website is any better than another. Websites aren't races. There are no second-class or third-class websites.

    5. A question on CSS or accessibility or even content management is a rare thing indeed. This isn't a community centred on helping people build their own websites, as I had first imagined[5]. Instead, it's a community attempting to shift the power in online socialising away from Big Tech and back towards people[6].

      There is more of the latter than the former to be certain, but I don't think it's by design.

      Many of the people there are already experts in some of these sub-areas, so there aren't as many questions on those fronts. Often there are other resources that are also better for these issues and links to them can be found within the wiki.

      The social portions are far more difficult, so this is where folks are a bit more focused.

      I think when the community grows, we'll see more of these questions about CSS, HTML, and accessibility. (In fact I wish more people were concerned about accessibility and why it was important.)

    6. Of course, the great thing about IndieWeb ideas is that if I ever do have that problem, a tool is already available. And if you have that problem right now, you just need to open up the IndieWeb toolkit and pull it out.

      You don't buy the hardware store because it's there, you visit it to get the right tool for the right job.

    7. the point isn't to integrate all of the things into your website. It's to solve the problem you have with a solution that has been community tested, openly developed, and will likely have already planned for some of the edge cases you wouldn't ever think of.

      The IndieWeb isn't a checklist, it's a smörgåsbord from which you can take (only) what you need.

    8. Instead, the IndieWeb is a toolkit. A collection of ideas, technologies, and services that can help you solve some particularly tricky problems. If you're wanting to get involved in the IndieWeb, the first question you need to ask is: what problem do I have?
    9. The IndieWeb is a Toolkit

      This simple phrase can be an important framing for many.

    10. That has helped me understand this cycle of adoption, defeat, and detachment, but it's also taught me that the IndieWeb isn't a thing. You don't join the IndieWeb or complete the IndieWeb. Attempting to do so will drive you mad 😂

      An important point.

      How can we better message this to new comers?

    11. When I first read about the IndieWeb it felt like a lot. I've written about this before, but the sheer weight of jargon in the space is frankly terrifying.

      How can the community do better at lowering this bar?

      There are many things people are used to doing online and there's at least a common visual grammar for that. A parallel may be for the grammar of movies and television. Everyone knows and feels a smash cut when they see it, but many may not know the word for it. Which bits of jargon are necessary and which are unnecessary?

      Example: There are many sub versions of the idea of syndication. Syndication in and out, which is relatively simple, but we've got half a dozen bits of jargon depending on one's perspective and what the sources and targets are. These are helpful for those of us who specialize and study the space, but are dreadful for the every day user who will use words like cross-post or syndicate instead. While the reframing to prioritize syndicating out from one's site is useful, perhaps it's easier to say that in more words and not with all the other subtleties.

    1. This looks like a great IndieWeb friendly WordPress theme.

      Colin has indicated that it's got microformats support with more to come.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Colin Devroe</span> in Colin Devroe (<time class='dt-published'>03/12/2021 04:58:57</time>)</cite></small>

    1. SquareWheel 4 hours ago [–] I agree, but I think it's also worth learning from past experiences. Pingbacks do create a significant spam problem. How does Webmention.io cope with that?

      Based on experience with Pingbacks, the Webmention specification requires the sending site to have a mentioning URL on a publicly available web page. This requirement by itself cuts down significantly on spam as it increases the cost of sending it. (Pingbacks/Trackbacks didn't have this requirement so it was easy to programmatically spew spam in all directions.) In addition to this, there's no requirement to show the received Webmention, so there's less benefit to some spammers in these cases.

      Many people who do receive and display them have separate mechanisms to moderate them before display, which also tends to minimize spam. Other sites that support Webmentions also dovetail with anti-spam services like Akismet which can help filter out spam out as well.

      And this is all without anyone adding the Vouch extension to the Webmention spec.

      Keep in mind that webmention.io is just a third party service to allow sites to use and leverage Webmention notifications without needing to write any code. Many major CMSes like WordPress, Drupal, Craft, WithKnown, et al. either support the spec out of the box or with plugins/modules. Each of these can also leverage anti-spam methods they have available separately. As an example of this, the WordPress plugin has an allow list for automatically approving webmentions from sites one regularly communicates with.

      The idea of Webmentions has been around for almost a decade, and the spec has been a W3C recommendation since 2017. Only one suspected case of Webmention spam has been reported in the wild in that time. I'd conservatively estimate that with 10,000+ independent websites sending/receiving over 2 million Webmentions in the past several years, it's not a bad start. For more details, ideas, and brainstorming for your potential use-cases see also: https://indieweb.org/spam

    1. I watched Ru work incredibly hard and diligently over many months to implement what she'd done. I wish I could do half of it, but I can definitely commiserate.

      Can't wait to see what you come up with in the coming year with the extra time you'll have gained not only from the switch, but everything else you've learned in the process.

    1. Why can’t you just email the web?

      An interesting framing for having your own website.

    1. Since “Sexy Times With Wangxian” became a whole Thing, it has spawned memes, spinoff fics, and a frankly fabulous fic prompt generator that scans all of the STWW tags and chooses some at random for you to write fics around. Just now I got the tags, “Foursome – M/M/M/M,” “I’m Bad At Summaries,” “Cryptography,” “Body Dysphoria,” and “Organs.” Outstanding.

      This could be an interesting feature for a personal website/blog. A generator that takes pre-existing taxonomies from one's website and suggests combinations of them as potential writing prompts when one has writer's block.

  5. Feb 2021
    1. Liked the post? Click the beard a few times.

      This is a clever and fun UI for implementing likes that seems on-brand for the website owner.

    1. They cannot simply put this article online on their blog: to be recognised as research work, it must be published in a respectable peer-reviewed journal.

      Why not? Why couldn't they put their articles on their own sites or even those of the libraries of their institutions where others might read and evaluate them? annotate them? argue over all the fine points?

    1. This is cool to see. Now I'll have to take a look and test it out.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Amanda J. Rush</span> in Amanda J. Rush on Twitter: "Add Microformats 2 to #GenesisWP child themes with a plugin by @remkusdevries https://t.co/8dBUvh0Rs0 #indieweb" / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>02/24/2021 20:38:22</time>)</cite></small>

    1. A fascinating and thoughtful article. One of the best things I've read in a month.

    2. In its most customary form, “commonplacing,” as it was called, involved transcribing interesting or inspirational passages from one’s reading, assembling a personalized encyclopedia of quotations. It was a kind of solitary version of the original web logs: an archive of interesting tidbits that one encountered during one’s textual browsing.

      Written in 2010, this may be one of the first mentions I've seen that relates blogging and websites to commonplace books.

    1. “Media companies were investing a huge amount of time, money, and effort in building out these huge audiences on social media…but at the end of the day, they’re renting those audiences from social media [companies], as opposed to owning those relationships,” Donoghue said.

      Media companies are spending huge amounts of time investing in social media, but they're also simultaneously renting their audiences back.

      Who rents a $350/month apartment and then spends $5,000 a month sprucing it up?

    1. Because the mainstream social networks have been designed by a tiny number of people, we have been prevented from experimenting and creating new knowledge about what sustainable community management online looks like. Start erasing the line between operators, customers, and community members and squint; you begin make out the shape of a group of people who can build for themselves and determine their own path of development.

      Interesting to look at this idea from the perspective of the IndieWeb community that owns and operates its own community spaces that are aggregated around a wiki and chat, but which overflow into the web itself.

      How does this relate to my idea of A Twitter of Our Own?

    2. These new paid communities largely live on invite-only Telegrams, Slacks, Discords, and Facebook groups, raising the question: could there be applications more suitable to these networks? Indeed, the growing popularity of paid communities has been noticed by a bunch of new venture-funded companies such as such as Genevachat, Mighty Networks, and Circle, all of which want to become “the platform for communities.”

      Platforms specifically for communities could be an interesting new object on the Internet. What sorts of IndieWeb building blocks would one use to build them? Are there new functionalities that they might have that aren't in the list of building blocks yet?

      I could see functionality like signing in with one's website using IndieAuth to access private content being a piece.

    1. A long, but worthwhile read. This goes into some valuable ideas about public spaces that the typical article on the independent web doesn't explore.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Fluffy</span> in Notes: All Our Selves In One Basket (<time class='dt-published'>2021-01-31 12:31:00 </time>)</cite></small>

    1. Transclusion would make this whole scenario quite different. Let's imagine this again...

      Many in the IndieWeb have already prototyped this using some open web standards. It's embodied in the idea of media fragments and fragmentions, a portmanteau of the words fragment and Webmention.

      A great example can be found at https://www.kartikprabhu.com/articles/marginalia

      This reminds me that I need to kick my own server to fix the functionality on my main site and potentially add it to a few others.

    1. Eternal September or the September that never ended[1] is Usenet slang for a period beginning in September 1993,[2][3] the month that Internet service provider America Online (AOL) began offering Usenet access to its many users, overwhelming the existing culture for online forums.

      This makes me wonder at what level a founder community can manage to maintain its founder effects for incoming new members?

      Is there existing research on this? Are there potential ways to guard against it in the future?

      What happens to the IndieWeb community if it were to see similar effects?

    1. I can even imagine a distant future where governments might sponsor e.g. social networking as a social service. I know many people don’t trust their governments, but when it comes down to it they’re more likely to be working in people’s interests than a group of unelected tech barons responsible only to their shareholders at best, or themselves in the cases where they have dual class stock with unequal voting rights, or even their families for 100s of years.

      Someone suggesting government run social media. There are potential problems, but I'm definitely in for public libraries doing this sort of work/hosting/maintenance.

    1. Essentially, we study culture at an "on the ground" level – looking for the individual stories, rich details, particular nuances, and thick description you can only find by spending extended time with people in their daily lives.

      I'm reading this and can't help but think it's sort of what Jack Jamieson did in writing his recent thesis Independent Together: Building and Maintaining Values in a Distributed Web Infrastructure.

      It's definitely the sort of thing that Maggie Appleton may appreciate.

    1. But while we can all agree that tech has a moderation problem, there's a lot less consensus on what to do about it. Broadly speaking, there are two broad approaches: the first is to fix the tech giants and the second is to fix the Internet.

      There is another approach (or two or more). The IndieWeb approach is another framing which isn't included in the two listed here, though it does have a few hints of "fixing the Internet" since they have created some new web recommendations through the W3C.

      Circling back to this, his definition of fix the Internet is talking about almost exactly IndieWeb.

  6. Jan 2021
    1. This has some interesting research which might be applied to better design for an IndieWeb social space.

      I'd prefer a more positive framing rather than this likely more negative one.

    1. We used the systems thinking iceberg as a tool for understanding more deeply how race and racism affect our programming, goals and approaches, and for thinking strategically about where to intervene for the highest leverage impact. Systems thinking guides us to shifting mental models as the highest leverage way to change a system. That’s why work connecting unconscious bias and structural interventions by john a. powell and others is so important. And, it’s why it’s so important to make sure we have the people who are most affected by our work at the table when we design and evaluate it. Their voices and perspectives are essential to make sure we’re challenging both mental models and practices that hold inequities in place.

      In addition to the racism solutions, this is also a useful framing for those designing better social media interactions within the IndieWeb.