29 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2017
    1. I would like to see contributions for which I am really interested, which stimulate me to think, in which I can learn something.

    1. I want a human curated web experience. I don’t want my experience curated by mysterious algorithms.

    1. Remember when the internet was going to usher in an age of peace and understanding because humans would be able to communicate with each other? It didn't happen.

      What didn't happen? The age of peace and understanding, or the ability for humans to communicate with each other freely?

  2. Jul 2017
    1. the role of the blog is different than it was even just a couple of years ago. It’s not the sole outpost of an online life, although it can be an anchor, holding it in place.

    1. If you want to respond, do so on your own website and tell me.

      Often it's the mechanism by which the tell me is the most difficult. Fortunately Webmentions make this a bit easier, particularly if they're moderated so the original author can control what's on their website.

  3. Jun 2017
    1. But the ability to work on indie projects is not available to all. The time and resources required to work indie are a sign of privilege, as is encouraging (and certainly expecting) all to work indie. As Anne Pasek writes, “all materials and practices … have a cost and thus a tollgate for participation.” (And there are many, often intersecting, forms of privilege that contribute to that “toll” ― race, gender, orientation, cultural background, economic background, able-bodiedness, etc.) So while indie work is great, and I’ve done a lot of it myself, we need to be careful about the ways in which we encourage and characterize indie work, noting in particular what it costs and who may be left behind or left out.

      This is all important and certainly true.

      However, as someone who knows he's certainly privileged, I view my definition of indie as something that is also open for others to come behind me and use for free or have the ability to reuse and remix in a way that corporate interests or non-indie work wouldn't. In a large sense, to me this means that while I may be privileged (whether that be socio-economically or even the time-encumbered), I'm helping to lower the cost and the burden for the less privileged who may come behind me to be able to do more, go further, or go faster.

      In some sense too, as described, indie has such a nebulous definition. Often when I see it in a technology related space I really read it as "Open Sourced".

    1. Content that isn’t indexable by search engines is not part of the open web.

  4. May 2017
    1. shifting it to another company which then gets to control (and even monetize) the conversation.

      As I've heard in the Indieweb chat: "Silos gonna silo."

    2. write your own blog post on your own damn site

      And isn't this what everyone should really be doing anyway so that they own their own work and words?

    1. my blog posts to be long-lived pieces of my consciousness: something I may want to refer back to, or remember in the future.

      a commonplace book!

    1. You’re giv­ing up far more than de­sign choice. Mr. Williams de­scribes Medium’s key ben­e­fit as res­cu­ing writ­ers from the “ter­ri­ble dis­trac­tion” of for­mat­ting chores. But con­sider the cost. Though he’s bait­ing the hook with de­sign, he’s also ask­ing you, the writer, to let him con­trol how you of­fer your work to read­ers. Mean­ing, to get the full ben­e­fit of Medium’s de­sign, you have to let your story live on Medium, send all your read­ers to Medium, have your work per­ma­nently en­tan­gled with other sto­ries on Medium, and so on—a sig­nif­i­cant concession.

      You're definitely not owning your own data.

  5. Apr 2017
    1. In indieweb we have been saying ‘build things that you want for yourself’, but building things that you want for your friends or organisation is a useful step between generations.

    1. webmentions

      I'd recommend defining webmentions along with a link to the spec and W3C recommendation just after linkbacks/pingbacks as their more modern successor.

      As some of your potential audience isn't webmention aware, you could/should add some additional definition for those who are unlikely to click through to see the real value they represent.

  6. Mar 2017
  7. Feb 2017
    1. At any given moment, a field may be dominated by squabbles, but, in the end, the methodology prevails. Science moves forward, even as we remain stuck in place.

      This also sounds like the reason why the Indieweb movement is so interesting and potentially useful.

  8. Aug 2016
    1. But first, what would motivate any young person today to pull the plug? Well maybe they should consider this for a moment. Who most wants you to stay on the grid? The advertisers. Your boss. Human Resources. The advertisers. Your parents (irony of ironies – once they distrusted it, now they need to tag you electronically, share your Facebook photos and message you to death). The advertisers. The government. Your local authority. Your school. Advertisers.

      Going of the grid hurts "The man" in 70's parlance.

  9. Apr 2016
    1. APIs are building blocks of software by definitionCompared with SaaS, by nature, they are platforms that allow development on top of them.It brings back the nature of “building block” that open source has and SaaS lost.API’s businesses focus on solving “smaller” problems but hard to crackFor that reason, there are higher chances that customers will trust an API provider for their core infrastructure.“If this is the only thing those guys do, there’s high chances they will do it better than myself”.

      This idea of APIs blending the best (business models) of open source and SaaS is intriguing.

    1. People want to own their data and their namespace but they don’t want to run servers to do it. What’s the solution? Separate the elements. Treat your personal server as a BDS (Big Dumb Server), there to answer API calls and file requests.  Move the admin interfaces up towards the client, and maintain them centrally the way apps are maintained. Eventually, move the presentation layer towards the client too, allowing readers power over how they consume the data on your server.

      • Database:
        • provided by host
        • general purpose
        • accessible by http or https API
      • Database administration:
        • Native app or Web interface making privileged API calls.
        • GUI file browser for web server folders and files.
      • Presentation Layer
        • Pull pages (or other data) from multiple databases.
        • Customizable: the data you want, in the way you want to display it or otherwise use it.

    1. appreciate your help

      I think that a major part of improving the issue of abuse and providing consent is building in notifications so that website owners will at least be aware that their site is being marked up, highlighted, annotated, and commented on in other locations or by other platforms. Then the site owner at least has the knowledge of what's happening and can then be potentially provided with information and tools to allow/disallow such interactions, particularly if they can block individual bad actors, but still support positive additions, thought, and communication. Ideally this blocking wouldn't occur site wide, which many may be tempted to do now as a knee-jerk reaction to recent events, but would be fine grained enough to filter out the worst offenders.

      Toward the end of notifications to site owners, it would be great if any annotating activity would trigger trackbacks, pingbacks, or the relatively newer and better webmention protocol of the WW3C out of the http://IndieWebCamp.com movement. Then site owners would at least have notifications about what is happening on their site that might otherwise be invisible to them.

      Perhaps there's a way to further implement filters or tools (a la Akismet on platforms like WordPress) that allow site users to mark materials as spam, abusive, or other so that they are then potentially moved from "public" facing to "private" so that the original highlighter can still see their notes, but that the platform isn't allowing the person's own website to act as a platform to give reach to bad actors.

      Further some site owners might appreciate graded filters (G, PG, PG-13, R, X) so that users or even parents can filter what they're willing to see. Consider also annotations on narrative forms that might be posted as spoilers--how can these be guarded against? (Possibly with CSS and a spoiler tag?) Options can be built into the platform itself as well as allowing server-side options for truly hard cases.

      My coding skills are rustier than I wish they were, but I'm available to help/consult if needed.

  10. Jan 2016
    1. Simple: We’re in danger of losing what’s made the Internet the most important medium in history – a decentralized platform where the people at the edges of the networks – that would be you and me – don’t need permission to communicate, create and innovate.

      Right on!

    1. Your articles and status messages can go to all services, not just one

      Interoperability?

    2. When you post something on the web, it should belong to you, not a corporation.

      Ownership of data/content. My annotations are mine.

  11. Dec 2015
    1. Hypothesis might make a fine alternative to Twitter.

      • Is anyone using hypothesis in this way yet?
      • What would be a good tag to distinguish "tweet" Notes?<br> (I guess it would be cute to use "tweet" as the tag.)
      • When there's not a specific webpage involved, what would be the best URLs on which to attach such a Note?<br> (I suppose any page of your own on a social media site or blog would do. I also see that we can annotate pages on local servers.)

  12. Nov 2015
    1. Reclaim Hosting, Known, and Brigham Young University are working on an interface for student domains that will provide easy cross-posting to several social media sites, and easy viewing of those posts among peers in groups. The students will still be able to install whatever other server software they need.

  13. Nov 2014
    1. What social networks does this work with? Right now, if you have a website on Known, you can use Bridgy to collect social interactions from Facebook and Twitter.

      This is partly wrong. I know at least that @bnvk uses Bridgy together with Social Igniter.

      Therefore the paragraph could also mention the #IndieWeb itself.

  14. Mar 2014