13 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. Coding is a problem-solving skill, and few of theproblems that beset young people today, or are likely to in thefuture, can be solved by writing scripts or programs for computersto execute. I suggest a less ambitious enterprise with broaderapplications, and I’ll begin by listing the primary elements of thatenterprise. I think every young person who regularly uses acomputer should learn the following:

      Alan Jacobs eschews the admonishment that everyone should learn to code and posits a more basic early literacy stepping-stone to coding: learning some basic preliminaries of self-hosting. This is likely much easier for most people and could build a better runway for those who would like to learn to code later on.

  2. May 2021
  3. Apr 2021
    1. I like how Dr. Pacheco-Vega outlines some of his research process here.

      Sharing it on Twitter is great, and so is storing a copy on his website. I do worry that it looks like the tweets are embedded via a simple URL method and not done individually, which means that if Twitter goes down or disappears, so does all of his work. Better would be to do a full blockquote embed method, so that if Twitter disappears he's got the text at least. Images would also need to be saved separately.

    1. Since I’m doing that, I’m also considering whether it makes sense for me to have a substack blog as well?

      Given some of the press Substack has gotten in the past few months, I think there's more to be said for actively leaving Substack to move to WordPress or some other platform where you can use your own domain name and content.

      Congratulations on the move!

    1. DM gives you simple but/and powerful tools to mark up, annotate and link your own networked collections of digital images and texts. Mark up your image and text documents with highlights that you can then annotate and link together. Identify discreet moments on images and texts with highlight tools including dots, lines, rectangles, circles, polygons, text tags, and multiple color options. Develop your projects and publications with an unlimited number of annotations on individual highlights and entire image and text documents. Highlights and entire documents can host an unlimited number of annotations, and annotations themselves can include additional layers of annotations. Once you've marked up your text and image documents with highlights and annotations, you can create links between individual highlights and entire documents, and your links are bi-directional, so you and other viewers can travel back and forth between highlights. Three kinds of tools, entire digital worlds of possible networks and connections.

      This looks like the sort of project that @judell @dwhly @remikalir and the Hypothes.is team may appreciate, if nothing else but for the user interface set up and interactions.

      I'll have to spin up a copy shortly to take a look under the hood.

  4. Mar 2021
  5. Feb 2021
    1. They cannot simply put this article online on their blog: to be recognised as research work, it must be published in a respectable peer-reviewed journal.

      Why not? Why couldn't they put their articles on their own sites or even those of the libraries of their institutions where others might read and evaluate them? annotate them? argue over all the fine points?

  6. Oct 2020
    1. Grant Potter

      Seeing the commentary from Greg McVerry and Aaron Davis, it's probably worthwhile to point you to the IndieWeb for Education wiki page which has some useful resources, pointers, and references. As you have time, feel free to add yourself to the list along with any brainstorming ideas you might have for using some of this technology within your work realm. Many hands make light work. Welcome to the new revolution!

    1. The architecture of the platform where I published allowed authorial control of content but could not control context collapse or social interactions.

      These are pieces which the IndieWeb should endeavor to experiment in and attempt to fix. Though I will admit that pieces of the IndieWeb layers on top of platforms like WordPress can help to mitigate some context collapse and aggregate social interactions better. (eg: reply context and POSSE)

    2. There is a sense that one can cobble together a common public by overlapping various social media platforms and audiences. Many of my colleagues are doing a fine job of problematizing the intersections of private social media and the university. The larger project from which this essay is drawn is part of that emerging conversation.

      I wonder here what role an IndieWeb-based version of academe looks like in which teachers all own their content on their own websites to make a more explicit appeal of work that they've done. Compare this with the concept that what they may be doing on Twitter isn't "work" and which isn't judged as such.

    1. When you can assume that all the materials you’re using in and with your class are open educational resources, here’s one way to remix the effective practices listed above with OER in order to provide you and your students with opportunities to spend your time and effort on work that makes the world a better place instead of wasting it on disposable assignments.

      As I think of remix, reuse, redistribute and things like git and version control, I also can't help but think that being able to send and receive webmentions in the process of reusing and redistribution with referential links back to the originals will allow the original creator to at least be aware of the changes and their existence to potentially manually add them to the original project. (Manually because they may not (yet) know how to keep their content under source control or allow others to do so and send pull requests.)