20 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. Blogs tend towards conversational and quotative reuse, which is great for some subject areas, but not so great for others. Wiki feeds forward into a consensus process that provides a high level of remix and reuse, but at the expense of personal control and the preservation of divergent goals.

      And here it is, the key to the universe!

      We need something that is a meld between the wiki and the blog. Something that will let learners aggregate, ponder, and then synthesize into their own voice. A place where they can create their own goals and directions.

    1. Here’s my pitch for a Dumb Twitter app: The app forces you to tweet at the original 140 character tweet length. You can reply. You can’t like or retweet. You most certainly can’t quote tweet. There is no private DMing. Linear tweet stream only.

      Perhaps he's unaware of it, but this sounds a lot like the design decisions that micro.blog has made in it's platform which is very similar to DoOO, but for the broader public.

    1. academia is built on the premise (IMHO) of getting a good idea, parlaying that into a job and tenure, and waiting for death. I’ve had a lot of colleagues and acquaintances ask why I would bother blogging. Ask why I share all of this content online. Ask why I’m not afraid that someone is going to steal my ideas.

      Though all too true, this is just a painful statement for me. The entirety of our modern world is contingent upon the creation of ideas, their improvement and evolution, and their spreading. In an academic world where attribution of ideas is paramount, why wouldn't one publish quickly and immediately on one's own site (or anywhere else they might for that matter keeping in mind that it's almost trivially easy to self-publish it on one's own website nearly instantaneously)?

      Early areas of science were held back by the need to communicate by handwriting letters as the primary means of communication. Books eventually came, but the research involved and even the printing process could take decades. Now the primary means of science communication is via large (often corporate owned) journals, but even this process may take a year or more of research and then a year or more to publish and get the idea out. Why not write the ideas up and put them out on your own website and collect more immediate collaborators? Funding is already in such a sorry state that generally, even an idea alone, will not get the ball rolling.

      I'm reminded of the gospel song "This little light of mine" whose popular lyrics include: "Hide it under a bushel? No! / I'm gonna let it shine" and "Don't let Satan blow it out, / I'm gonna let it shine"

      I'm starting to worry that academia in conjunction with large corporate publishing interests are acting the role of Satan in the song which could easily be applied to ideas as well as to my little light.


      [also on boffosocko.com]

    1. By the end of the course, my professor encouraged me to purchase my own domain. Her concern was for authorial control that would signal to readers that my content should be treated according to the media and academic logics where citations and attributions are normative. I used a pre-paid credit card to purchase my domain and the website followed me to graduate school.

      A great story of the beginning of her Domain of One's Own.

    1. However there are going to be lots of scenarios where students are required to use institutional tech. In those cases I still think we need to more willing to delete by default, and not leave the burden on the students. It’s a different mind-set – to purposefully throw away data – but I think it’s becoming a fundamental privacy issue.

      A big piece of the DoOO and IndieWeb philosophies is predicate on the student/teacher/other having their own domain name. Thus, even if they're dependent on institutional technology and/or platforms, they can usually easily export their data, move it to another host and/or platform, and then still have all the URLs live on for as long as they like. If they prefer, they can also have control over whether their content is published to the public, or unpublished/password protected so that only they or those they choose have access to it after-the-fact.

  2. Dec 2019
    1. And I am planning on cutting back on my personal use of social media (easier said than done) and want to try to return to using my blog more than Twitter for sharing.

      certainly a laudable goal!

      It helped me a lot to simply delete most of the social media apps off of my phone. I scribbled a bit about the beginning of the process back in November and there's a link there to a post by Ben doing the same thing on his own website.

      More people are leaving social feeds for RSS feeds lately. I've recently started following Jeremy Felt who is taking this same sort of journey himself. See: https://jeremyfelt.com/tag/people-still-blog/

      Kudos as well to making the jump here:

      Taking a bit of a Twitter break. I'm going to try to stay off until the new year, but likely lack the willpower to stay off for more than a few hours. Wish me luck!<br><br>....but silently. Not via reply to to this tweet. Cause that'll just suck me back into the vortext.

      — Clint Lalonde (he/him) (@edtechfactotum) December 19, 2019
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      In part, it's what prompted me to visit your site to write a comment. (Sorry for upping your cis-gendered white male count, but 2019 was a bad year, and hopefully we can all make 2020 better as you've indicated.)

    2. By the numbers

      I'm curious what things would look like if you similarly did an analysis of Twitter, Facebook, etc.? Where are you putting more time? What's giving you the most benefit? Where are you getting value and how are you giving it back?

  3. Nov 2017
    1. A video for Domains 2017. All footage by the amazing Meredith Fierro. Contributions from Zach Whalen, Steve Greenlaw, Nora Forknall, Janine Davis, Mark Synder, Clark Billups, Lee Skallerup Bessette, Callie Liberty, Parrish Waters, Claudine Ferrell, Sierra, Andi Livi Smith, Elaina Finkelstein, Troy Paino, Kris Shaffer, Jenn Hill, Stephanie Buckler, and Audrey Watters.

      Recognized a few, but not everyone. Would need to watch Meredith Fierra’s full film (with lower thirds, one might assume). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9dGAAe-emY

  4. Feb 2017
  5. Apr 2016
    1. Jeremy DeanPosted on January 27, 2016January 28, 2016Categories Getting Started

      As a side-note (pun intended?), to help beautify your web presence a bit, you might notice that your photo doesn't show up in the author position in your 2016 theme on single posts. To fix this, you can (create and) use your WordPress.com username/password to create an account on their sister site Gravatar.com. Uploading your preferred photo on Gravatar and linking it to an email will help to automatically populate your photo in both your site and other wordpress sites across the web. To make it work on your site, just go to your user profile in your wordpress install and use the same email address in your user profile as your gravatar account and the system will port your picture across automatically. If necessary, you can use multiple photos and multiple linked email addresses in your gravatar account to vary your photos.

  6. Jan 2016
    1. The key here is the crafting of an identity with a purpose, the conscious consideration and creation of one’s professional/academic identity online: a domain of one’s own!

      Original use of phrase?

    1. each student builds a personal cyberinfrastructure that is as thoughtfully, rigorously, and expressively composed as an excellent essay or an ingenious experiment.

      Nice line.

    2. Here's one idea. Suppose that when students matriculate, they are assigned their own web servers — not 1GB folders in the institution's web space but honest-to-goodness virtualized web servers of the kind available for $7.99 a month from a variety of hosting services, with built-in affordances ranging from database maintenance to web analytics.

      Origin of the Domain of One's Own?

    1. many authors base their practice on proprietary tools and formats that sometimes fall short of even the most basic requirements of scholarly writing.

      So the issue is both with the proprietary nature of the tools (and the concomitant vicissitudes) and the simple pragmatism of the tool for the job.

  7. Aug 2015