7 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2019
    1. Here’s my pitch for a Dumb Twitter app: The app forces you to tweet at the original 140 character tweet length. You can reply. You can’t like or retweet. You most certainly can’t quote tweet. There is no private DMing. Linear tweet stream only.

      Perhaps he's unaware of it, but this sounds a lot like the design decisions that micro.blog has made in it's platform which is very similar to DoOO, but for the broader public.

  2. Mar 2019
    1. But that post-digital lens asks us to look beyond the “twitter is a cesspool” argument.

      This is important because even well meaning and thoughtful platforms like micro.blog could have bad actors once they reach scale. Working on this separate and broader issue can mitigate those eventualities.

  3. Jan 2019
    1. Then I learned about the IndieWeb movement and Micro.blog, and I fell in love with the Internet as I once hoped it would be: a place where people could congregate, converse, and learn from one another with somewhat minimal rancor — and without an overtly overarching need to make a buck with their “content.”
  4. Aug 2018
    1. M.B can’t be reduced to stereotypes, of course. But there’s also a bar to entry into this social-media network, and it’s a distinctly technophilic, first-world, Western bar.

      You can only say this because I suspect you're comparing it to platforms that are massively larger by many orders of magnitude. You can't compare it to Twitter or Facebook yet. In fact, if you were to compare it to them, then it would be to their early versions. Twitter was very technophilic for almost all of it's first three years until it crossed over into the broader conscious in early 2009.

      Your argument is somewhat akin to doing a national level political poll and only sampling a dozen people in one small town.

  5. Jul 2018
    1. Micro.blog is not an alternative silo: instead, it’s what you build when you believe that the web itself is the great social network.

      So true!!!

  6. Jun 2018
    1. My heart forever broken by social-media silos, I’m not really interested in using Micro.blog as yet another “Okay, I’m over here now” social network. I get the impression that it has potential for much deeper use than that, if I can only get my head around it.

      Micro.blog can be many things to many people which can be confusing, particularly when you're a very tech savvy person and can see all the options at once. I'd recommend looking at it like a custom feed reader for a community of people you'd like to follow and interact with. Spend some time in the reader and just interact with those you're following and they'll do likewise in return.

      It's purposely missing some of the dopamine triggers other social silos have, so you may need to retrain your brain to use it appropriately, but I think it's worthwhile if you do.

  7. Apr 2018
    1. There’s a lot of overlap between Micro.blog and IndieWeb (webmentions being the most significant commonality), and IndieWeb isn’t one monolithic thing.

      micro.blog is a paid hosting service that can allow one to have an IndieWeb website, while at the same time is open enough that one can have their own separate site and connect with the micro.blog community using it primarily as a reader.

      What micro.blog is to you is highly dependent on what tools you're already bringing to the table.