3 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2020
    1. Manton says owning your domain so you can move your content without breaking URLs is owning your content, whereas I believe if your content still lives on someone else's server, and requires them to run the server and run their code so you can access your content, it's not really yours at all, as they could remove your access at any time.

      This is a slippery slope problem, but people are certainly capable of taking positions along a broad spectrum here.

      The one thing I might worry about--particularly given micro.blog's--size is the relative bus factor of one represented by Manton himself. If something were to happen to him, what recourse has he built into make sure that people could export their data easily and leave the service if the worst were to come to happen? Is that documented somewhere?

      Aside from this the service has one of the most reasonable turn-key solutions for domain and data ownership I've seen out there without running all of your own infrastructure.

  2. Aug 2020
    1. Maybe of interest for some readers here: With your plugin, it's also straightforward to import the "tweets.csv" file from the official Twitter archive, which contains all the tweets (and a lot of metadata) from one's personal account. Still don't know what to do with this in TiddlyWiki, but there is certainly potential...
  3. Feb 2020
    1. I just wrote a long, considered, friendly, and I hope helpful comment here but -- sorry, I have to see the irony in this once again -- your system wouldn't let me say anything longer tahn 1,500 characters. If you want more intelligent conversations, you might want to expand past soundbite.

      In 2008, even before Twitter had become a thing at 180 characters, here's a great reason that people should be posting their commentary on their own blogs.

      This example from 2008 is particularly rich as you'll find examples on this page of Derek Powazek and Jeff Jarvis posting comments with links to much richer content and commentary on their own websites.

      We're a decade+ on and we still haven't managed to improve on this problem. In fact, we may have actually made it worse.

      I'd love to see On the Media revisit this idea. (Of course their site doesn't have comments at all anymore either.)