42 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2022
    1. Kai Kupferschmidt. (2021, December 1). @DirkBrockmann But these kinds of models do help put into context what it means when certain countries do or do not find the the variant. You can find a full explanation and a break-down of import risk in Europe by airport (and the people who did the work) here: Https://covid-19-mobility.org/reports/importrisk_omicron/ https://t.co/JXsYdmTnNP [Tweet]. @kakape. https://twitter.com/kakape/status/1466109304423993348

    1. The final piece that's pushing the two first crucial changes over the paradigm hill is import maps. They allow the use of logical references for modules in ES6 (also known as ESM), rather than explicit file references.
    1. Today, many web developers are even using JavaScript's native module syntax, but combining it with bare import specifiers, thus making their code unable to run on the web without per-application, ahead-of-time modification. We'd like to solve that, and bring these benefits to the web.
  2. Mar 2022
  3. Feb 2022
  4. gingkowriter.com gingkowriter.com
    1. https://gingkowriter.com/

      This looks like an interesting tool for moving from notes to an outline to a written document. Could be interesting for dovetailing with a zettelkasten.

      How to move data from something like Obsidian to Ginko Writer though?

  5. Sep 2021
    1. From my point of view, this approach will help you to write cleaner code. Also, it will help to maintain the project. For instance, moving a file from the current directory to another will cause fewer problems, because every file uses an absolute path instead of a relative one. Last but not least, it helps you during development.
    1. Saying that web devs used to be fine with relative imports is like saying that human beings used to be fine living without refrigerators. Sure we did. But was it better than it is now? No. No, it wasn't.
  6. May 2021
  7. Apr 2021
    1. We will dispatch rewards from our factory to our FOUR 3rd party fulfillment centers, to keep things as friendly* as possible worldwide in accordance with all worldwide laws. *"Friendly" to us means: We will collect and pay VAT/Taxes upon importing to our  fulfilment centers on everyone's behalf so we can send your rewards DDP vs DAP.  If we were not "Friendly" - we would send games direct (DAP) and you would have to pay VAT and admin fees as well as a postal fee to "pick up" your reward locally - vs DDP where that is all done for you and the reward is delivered to your doorstep, "friendly".  It costs lots of money to ship 4 containers to 4 different fulfilment centers - but we do that in an effort to help our backers and to be *friendly.
  8. Mar 2021
  9. Dec 2020
  10. Nov 2020
    1. Everyone working in a TypeScript project that grows beyond a certains limit will eventually experience the situation commonly described as path hell, the snippet below is an example of such hell.
    1. The rule is written @forward "<url>". It loads the module at the given URL just like @use, but it makes the public members of the loaded module available to users of your module as though they were defined directly in your module. Those members aren’t available in your module, though—if you want that, you’ll need to write a @use rule as well.

      Just like how you have to also import (@use) a JS module if you want to use it locally, even if you export (@forward) it.

    1. The new @use is similar to @import. but has some notable differences:
    2. In brief, @import is being replaced with more explicit @use and @forward rules. Over the next few years Sass @import will be deprecated, and then removed.
    3. When you use a function like color(). it’s impossible to know exactly where it was defined. Which @import does it come from?
    1. Unlike some other languages, Sass doesn’t require that you use ./ for relative imports. Relative imports are always available.
    2. We’ve written a migration tool that automatically converts most @import-based code to @use-based code in a flash.
    3. The @import rule has a number of serious issues:
    1. The sass-loader uses Sass's custom importer feature to pass all queries to the Webpack resolving engine. Thus you can import your Sass modules from node_modules. Just prepend them with a ~ to tell Webpack that this is not a relative import: @import '~bootstrap';
  11. Oct 2020
    1. Maybe of interest for some readers here: With your plugin, it's also straightforward to import the "tweets.csv" file from the official Twitter archive, which contains all the tweets (and a lot of metadata) from one's personal account. Still don't know what to do with this in TiddlyWiki, but there is certainly potential...
  12. Sep 2020
    1. Even though it works much like a function, import() is an operator
    2. The module specifier is always fixed. That is, you can’t change what you import depending on a condition. And you can’t assemble a specifier dynamically.
  13. Apr 2020
  14. Nov 2019
    1. To make this even easier, you can also simply import @testing-library/react/dont-cleanup-after-each which will do the same thing.
  15. Sep 2019
  16. Sep 2018