25 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
    1. I recently started building a website that lives at wesleyac.com, and one of the things that made me procrastinate for years on putting it up was not being sure if I was ready to commit to it. I solved that conundrum with a page outlining my thoughts on its stability and permanence:

      It's worth introspecting on why any given person might hesitate to feel that they can commit. This is almost always comes down to "maintainability"—websites are, like many computer-based endeavors, thought of as projects that have to be maintained. This is a failure of the native Web formats to appreciably make inroads as a viable alternative to traditional document formats like PDF and Word's .doc/.docx (or even the ODF black sheep). Many people involved with Web tech have difficulty themselves conceptualizing Web documents in these terms, which is unfortunate.

      If you can be confident that you can, today, bang out something in LibreOffice, optionally export to PDF, and then dump the result at a stable URL, then you should feel similarly confident about HTML. Too many people have mental guardrails preventing them from grappling with the relevant tech in this way.

  2. Jun 2022
  3. May 2022
    1. Building and sharing an app should be as easy as creating and sharing a video.

      This is where I think Glitch goes wrong. Why such a focus on apps (and esp. pushing the same practices and overcomplicated architecture as people on GitHub trying to emulate the trendiest devops shovelware)?

      "Web" is a red herring here. Make the Web more accessible for app creation, sure, but what about making it more accessible (and therefore simpler) for sharing simple stuff (like documents comprising the written word), too? Glitch doesn't do well at this at all. It feels less like a place for the uninitiated and more like a place for the cool kids who are already slinging/pushing Modern Best Practices hang out—not unlike societal elites who feign to tether themself to the mast of helping the downtrodden but really use the whole charade as machine for converting attention into prestige and personal wealth. Their prices, for example, reflect that. Where's the "give us, like 20 bucks a year and we'll give you better alternative to emailing Microsoft Office documents around (that isn't Google Sheets)" plan?

    1. However when you look UNDERNEATH these cloud services, you get a KERNEL and a SHELL. That is the "timeless API" I'm writing to.

      It's not nearly as timeless as a person might have themselves believe, though. (That's the "predilection" for certain technologies and doing things in a certain way creeping in and exerting its influence over what should otherwise be clear and sober unbiased thought.)

      There's basically one timeless API, and that means written procedures capable of being carried out by a human if/when everything else inevitably fails. The best format that we have for conveying the content comprising those procedures are the formats native to the Web browser—esp. HTML. Really. Nothing else even comes close. (NB: pixel-perfect reproduction à la PDF is out of scope, and PDF makes a bunch of tradeoffs to try to achieve that kind of fidelity which turns out to make it unsuitable/unacceptable in a way that HTML is not, if you're being honest with your criteria, which is something that most people who advocate for PDF's benefits are not—usually having deceived even themselves.)

      Given that Web browsers also expose a programming environment, the next logical step involves making sure these procedures are written to exploit that environment as a means of automation—for doing the drudge work in the here and now (i.e., in the meantime, when things haven't yet fallen apart).

  4. Mar 2022
  5. citeseerx.ist.psu.edu citeseerx.ist.psu.edu
    1. The complete overlapping of readers’ and authors’ roles are important evolution steps towards a fully writable web, as is the ability of deriving personal versions of other authors’ pages.
  6. Jun 2021
  7. Apr 2021
  8. Mar 2021
    1. TRAILBLAZER-STORY will follow as it turned out to be inevitable for setting up application state for tests. Instead of fumbling around with factories and traits in your tests, you “tell a story” about what to create in which order, easily customizable, and all written using activities.
    1. It is absolutely advisable to use factory in combination with let. let(:song) { factory( Song::Create, { title: "Timebomb", band: "Rancid" } ) }
    2. You should always use operations as factories in tests.
    3. There are several helpers to deal with operation tests and operations used as factories.
  9. Feb 2021
  10. Nov 2020
  11. Oct 2020
  12. developer.mozilla.org developer.mozilla.org
    1. using EventTarget.addEventListener(), and this generally replaces using the old HTML event handler attributes.
  13. Sep 2020
    1. for example, reactive declarations essentially do the work of React's useMemo, useCallback and useEffect without the boilerplate (or indeed the garbage collection overhead of creating inline functions and arrays on each state change).
  14. May 2020
    1. React Static is also a great replacement for the ever popular Create React App CLI. It provides a similar developer experience, zero-config environment, and features, but without boxing you in. If you ever need to customize your build system in React Static, there is no need to eject!
  15. Mar 2020
  16. Nov 2019