19 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Not everybody uses rubygems as their package management system. If this sounds odd to you, read https://gist.github.com/54177.
  2. Mar 2020
    1. 27$/year

      They spell it "27$/year" instead of "$27/year". I love it that they bucked the useless convention of putting $ sign first and did it the way that makes more sense. We've all had that thought, why do we say it "27 dollars" but write it, "dollars 27". It just doesn't make sense.

    1. I usually write in Google's online word processor Google Docs, even when noting the company's shortcomings. This article is different: it was drafted in a similar but more private service called Graphite Docs.
    1. If these asset owners regarded the “robots” as having the same status as guide dogs, blind people or default human citizens, they would undoubtedly stop imposing CAPTCHA tests and just offer APIs with reasonable limits applied.
    1. Q. Why does Rubinius not support frozen and tainted? A. Rubinius has better features; frozen and tainted are considered harmful. To elaborate... Both frozen and tainted depend on strewing checks throughout the source code. As a classic weak-link system, only one of those checks needs to be misplaced for the guarantees offered by either to fail. Since the number of checks is high, and as new code is written new checks need to be considered, the features inherently constitute unbounded complexity and unbounded risk.
    1. You could try AoE (ATA over Ethernet, very fast since it's Layer 2 protocol). SSHfs is yet another option (fast setup and encrypted by default). Or iSCSI (wich is tricky to setup).
    1. This might not be the most user-friendly solution. But it’s certainly creative and something different from your typical captcha systems. Pennyauth aims to verify your users by asking them to pay $0.01 per login. Payments are processed using QUID — and users can submit payment in as little time as it takes for them to grab their credit card.
    1. If you ever need to work with external translators, it’s a bit of a pain sending both your YML files and a bunch of views like index.en.html.erb. For one thing, you need some code to find all those files and send them, and put them back after receiving the translations. For another, your translator must respect the markup and code of the template, and know not to translate them. And if you want to use tools like WebTranslateIt, it’s easier to stick to YML.

      Good point. Better to store translations in your I18n backend in the same place as your subject translations, etc. (which by default is in YAML file).

  3. Dec 2019
    1. ReST

      "ReST" instead of "REST". I like how this way matches the case of the actual phrase that it's standing in for "Representational State Transfer", so you can better tell which letters are the beginning of words (all but "e").

  4. Nov 2019
    1. REST and GraphQL are wonderful tools to create an API that is meant to be consumed by third parties. Facebook's API, for example, is consumed by ~200k third parties. It is no surprise that Facebook is using (and invented) GraphQL; a GraphQL API enables third parties to extensively access Facebook's social graph enabling them to build all kinds of applications. For an API with that many consumers, GraphQL is the fitting tool. But, to create an internal API (an API developed and consumed by code written by the same organization), RPC offers a simpler and more powerful alternative. Large companies, such as Netflix, Google and Facebook, are starting to replace REST/GraphQL with RPC for their internal APIs. Most notably with gRPC which is getting popular in the industry.
  5. Sep 2019