11 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
  2. Mar 2021
    1. is the capacity for a word or phrase to have multiple meanings, usually related by contiguity of meaning within a semantic field.
    1. HTML elements have meaning. "Semantically correct" means that your elements mean what they are supposed to.
    2. Another example: a list (<ul> or <ol>) should generally be used to group similar items (<li>). You could use a div for the group and a <span> for each item, and style each span to be on a separate line with a bullet point, and it might look the way you want. But "this is a list" conveys more information.
    3. Knowing what your elements are lets browsers use sensible defaults for how they should look and behave. This means you have less customization work to do and are more likely to get consistent results in different browsers.
  3. Feb 2021
    1. I use <b>s for the decorative portions of the layout because they’re purely decorative elements. There’s no content to strongly emphasize or to boldface, and semantically a <b> isn’t any better or worse than a <span>. It’s just a hook on which to hang some visual effects. And it’s shorter, so it minimizes page bloat (not that a few characters will make all that much of a difference). More to the point, the <b>’s complete lack of semantic meaning instantly flags it in the markup as being intentionally non-semantic. It is, in that meta sense, self-documenting.