28 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2021
  2. Dec 2020
    1. Does anyone know how to make npm use a specific fork containing a bug fix while waiting for maintainer to merge a pull request? I was just going to point my package.json to this fork, like this: "svelte-material-ui": "https://github.com/vtpatrickeddy/svelte-material-ui.git#patch-1", but that doesn't work because the repo is a monorepo. And there doesn't appear to be a way to specify a subdirectory inside it, like: "@smui/textfield": "https://github.com/vtpatrickeddy/svelte-material-ui.git/packages/textarea#patch-1",
  3. Oct 2020
  4. Sep 2020
    1. This is more a rhetoric question as this seems to be quite hard ;-) There is a long discussion about installing a subfolder of a repository and monorepos in general at the NPM Github issues (yarn misses this feature, too). The thing is that this makes it quite hard to report issues of your project as one can't test the current master easily. Do you recommend a way how to use the latest Github version?
  5. Dec 2019
    1. GitHub Packages uses the native package tooling commands you're already familiar with to publish and install package versions.

      Looks like GitHub Packages acts as a wrapper to these clients, acting on your behalf so you don't have to use the CLI yourself.

    1. But what you absolutely should do is test your NPM package in its published format. Create some smoke tests that reside in the actual codebase, but are not part of the test suite.
  6. Sep 2019
    1. NPM was not and is still not designed to specifically be a node package manager. Yes it has a lot of useful features supporting node.js (some like node_modules is even hardcoded in node.js) but it actually doesn't care what language your software is written in. It is a package manager for your OS, just like apt and yum (or brew for you Mac users).
    2. This is because it's not a node-specific package manager so what it installs could be a Python script or a shell script or a binary executable written in assembly.
  7. Aug 2019
    1. prepare: Run both BEFORE the package is packed and published, on local npm install without any arguments, and when installing git dependencies