8 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2021
    1. I'm not very familiar with this feature. Do you know what version of Rails is required for this code to work? Is it Rails 6.0+? We run the test suite via Travis CI for many versions of Rails so I am concerned that this will cause test failures on older versions. Can we write the tests so that they gracefully exclude the CSP stuff on older versions where CSP is not supported?
    1. {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4} => {a:, b:, **rest} # a == 1, b == 2, rest == {:c=>3, :d=>4}

      equivalent in javascript:

      {a, b, ...rest} = {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4}
      

      Not a bad replacement for that! I still find javascript's syntax a little more easily readable and natural, but given that we can't use the same syntax (probably because it would be incompatible with existing syntax rules that we can't break for compatibility reasons, unfortunately), this is a pretty good compromise/solution that they've come up with.

  2. Oct 2020
    1. The backwards compatible implementation of jsx(...), we would still support key passed as props. We'd just pull it off props and issue a warning that this pattern is deprecated. The upgrade path is to just pass it to JSX separately if you need it.
    1. It's easy to persist the entire application state in a way that is backwards-compatible, so persisted states can survive application changes.
  3. Jul 2020
    1. It does, however, provide the --porcelain option, which causes the output of git status --porcelain to be formatted in an easy-to-parse format for scripts, and will remain stable across Git versions and regardless of user configuration.
  4. May 2020
  5. Apr 2020