9 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2021
    1. The problem is that you what you want is actually not de-structuring at all. You’re trying to go from 'arg1', { hash2: 'bar', hash3: 'baz' }, { hash1: 'foo' } (remember that 'arg1', foo: 'bar' is just shorthand for 'arg1', { foo: 'bar' }) to 'arg1', { hash1: 'foo', hash2: 'bar', hash3: 'baz' } which is, by definition, merging (note how the surrounding structure—the hash—is still there). Whereas de-structuring goes from 'arg1', [1, 2, 3] to 'arg1', 1, 2, 3
    1. {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4} => {a:, b:, **rest} # a == 1, b == 2, rest == {:c=>3, :d=>4}

      equivalent in javascript:

      {a, b, ...rest} = {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4}
      

      Not a bad replacement for that! I still find javascript's syntax a little more easily readable and natural, but given that we can't use the same syntax (probably because it would be incompatible with existing syntax rules that we can't break for compatibility reasons, unfortunately), this is a pretty good compromise/solution that they've come up with.

    2. we’re going to look how improved pattern matching and rightward assignment make it possible to “destructure” hashes and arrays in Ruby 3—much like how you’d accomplish it in, say, JavaScript
  2. Oct 2020
    1. A reasonably clean alternative would be to map a function over the array and use destructuring in the each loop: {#each [1, 2, 3, 4].map(n => ({ n, sqr_n: n * n })) as { n, sqr_n }} {sqr_n} {sqr_n / 2}<br> {/each}
    1. If you prefer, you can use destructuring — each cats as { id, name } — and replace cat.id and cat.name with id and name.
  3. Sep 2020
  4. Aug 2019