31 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2020
    1. Anti-automation on the form where a key can be requested is one thing, stopping someone from manually registering, say, 20 of them with different email addresses and massively amplifying their request rate is quite another.
  2. Mar 2020
    1. They are in place to prevent brute forcing a password. If you had to complete these every time you login, a person has to be there to answer it. This makes it so you can’t leave a guessing software to break your password. So, in short, it's for your account’s safety.
    2. Robots are currently suffering extreme discrimination due to a few false assumptions, mainly that they’re distinctly separate actors from humans. My point of view is that robots and humans often need to behave in the same way, so it’s a fruitless and pointless endeavour to try distinguishing them.
    3. In order to bypass these discriminatory CAPTCHA filters
    1. It won't let me go beyond this page. I'm sure I've answered the CAPTCHA correctly at least some of the 10+ times I've tried. What's going on?

      I can't even access their static website to find contact information for how to contact them about this problem!

    1. This might not be the most user-friendly solution. But it’s certainly creative and something different from your typical captcha systems. Pennyauth aims to verify your users by asking them to pay $0.01 per login. Payments are processed using QUID — and users can submit payment in as little time as it takes for them to grab their credit card.
    1. Turns out that this new algorithm can also be used to read CAPTCHA puzzles—we found that it can decipher the hardest distorted text puzzles from reCAPTCHA with over 99% accuracy. This shows that the act of typing in the answer to a distorted image should not be the only factor when it comes to determining a human versus a machine.
    2. CAPTCHAs will be dead in the next 10 years, because computers will be better at solving them than any human.
    1. In order to combat these form spam BOTS, websites often employ a series of textual or picture quizzes to the user submitting the form such as CAPTCHA. These tests are somewhat effective for standard BOTS, but are annoying to website visitors and often lead to abandoned contacts or site sales. In addition, BOTS are evolving to the point where these measures are becoming obsolete and ineffective.
    1. Google Recaptcha and personal dataBut we all know: there’s no such thing as a free lunch right? So what is the price we pay for this great feature? Right: it’s personal data.
    2. For years, the most used solution was to add an ugly captcha to the form, with some hard to read letters, numbers etc on an image. The user had to type these in an input field. The spambots have a hard time reading these images: problem solved!But this solution is not very user-friendly: it’s ugly, and annoys users so much you might lose conversions.
  3. Nov 2019
    1. it might be due to the navigator.webdriver DOM property being true by default in Selenium-driven browsers. In Firefox, you can set the dom.webdriver.enabled config variable to false (go to about:config to change the variable), which disables this property. In my case this stopped reCAPTCHA triggering.
    2. Post some highly desirable content on line, and protect it with a copy of the captcha you need solved ... and record and re-use the solution your visitors give you
    3. I'd slightly challenge: "By definition, resolving a CAPTCHA cannot be automated". The design goals are that it cannot be automated; however, not being automatable(?) does not follow by definition.