7 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The privacy policy — unlocking the door to your profile information, geodata, camera, and in some cases emails — is so disturbing that it has set off alarms even in the tech world.

      This Intercept article covers some of the specific privacy policy concerns Barron hints at here. The discussion of one of the core patents underlying the game, which is described as a “System and Method for Transporting Virtual Objects in a Parallel Reality Game" is particularly interesting. Essentially, this system generates revenue for the company (in this case Niantic and Google) through the gamified collection of data on the real world - that selfie you took with squirtle is starting to feel a little bit less innocent in retrospect...

    2. Yelp, like Google, makes money by collecting consumer data and reselling it to advertisers.

      This sentence reminded me of our "privacy checkup" activity from week 7 and has made me want to go and review the terms of service for some of the companies featured in this article- I don't use yelp, but Venmo and Lyft are definitely keeping track of some of my data.

  2. Jul 2020
  3. Mar 2020
    1. Rojas-Lozano claimed that the second part of Google’s two-part CAPTCHA feature, which requires users to transcribe and type into a box a distorted image of words, letters or numbers before entering its site, is also used to transcribe words that a computer cannot read to assist with Google’s book digitization service. By not disclosing that, she argued, Google was getting free labor from its users.
  4. Aug 2019
    1. Now, I'd rather pay for a product that sticks around than have my personal data sold to use a free product that may not be around tomorrow. I value my privacy much more today. If you're not paying for the product... you are the product being sold.