110 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. During 1995, a decision was made to (officially) start licensing the Mac OS and Macintosh ROMs to 3rd party manufacturers who started producing Macintosh "clones". This was done in order to achieve deeper market penetration and extra revenue for the company. This decision lead to Apple having over a 10% market share until 1997 when Steve Jobs was re-hired as interim CEO to replace Gil Amelio. Jobs promptly found a loophole in the licensing contracts Apple had with the clone manufacturers and terminated the Macintosh OS licensing program, ending the Macintosh clone era. The result of this action was that Macintosh computer market share quickly fell from 10% to around 3%.
  2. Nov 2019
    1. You might want developers building projects with this CMS to be able to change the behaviour of some UIs, or to be able to provide new components that can be consumed by the CMS. Those components can't easily be included in the JS bundle for the CMS, as it would require recompiling the shipped code with outside references.
    1. However, again you would have to lift state up to the App component in order to pass the amount to the currency components. As you can see, the component composition on its own doesn't help us to solve the problem. That's the point where React's render props pattern comes into play which enhances React's component composition with an important ingredient: a render function.
    1. Learning Domains

      This website provides several examples of domains adults may learn in or engage with. By clicking on each type, you are redirected to a detailed description of the domain. Descriptions include, but are not limited to, definitions, theories and research behind the topic, and real-world examples. You can also find references used in the description, which can be helpful for further exploration. This InstructionalDesign.org website also provides extensive lists of learning concepts (i.e. motivation, personalized learning, storyboard, etc.) and theories (i.e. Adult Learning Theory, Social Learning, Constructivism, etc.). Each learning theory link provides a theoretical definition, applications, examples, key principles, references, and related websites. Rating 10/10.

    1. This brings me to the crucial issue. Unlike the position that exists in the physical sciences, in economics and other disciplines that deal with essentially complex phenomena, the aspects of the events to be accounted for about which we can get quantitative data are necessarily limited and may not include the important ones. While in the physical sciences it is generally assumed, probably with good reason, that any important factor which determines the observed events will itself be directly observable and measurable, in the study of such complex phenomena as the market, which depend on the actions of many individuals, all the circumstances which will determine the outcome of a process, for reasons which I shall explain later, will hardly ever be fully known or measurable. And while in the physical sciences the investigator will be able to measure what, on the basis of a prima facie theory, he thinks important, in the social sciences often that is treated as important which happens to be accessible to measurement. This is sometimes carried to the point where it is demanded that our theories must be formulated in such terms that they refer only to measurable magnitudes.
    2. The particular occasion of this lecture, combined with the chief practical problem which economists have to face today, have made the choice of its topic almost inevitable. On the one hand the still recent establishment of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science marks a significant step in the process by which, in the opinion of the general public, economics has been conceded some of the dignity and prestige of the physical sciences. On the other hand, the economists are at this moment called upon to say how to extricate the free world from the serious threat of accelerating inflation which, it must be admitted, has been brought about by policies which the majority of economists recommended and even urged governments to pursue. We have indeed at the moment little cause for pride: as a profession we have made a mess of things.
    1. copy of theseguidelines will be included in a contract on the network,and updates to these guidelines ow through the Audiusgovernance protocol. A full fee and bond schedule forarbitration will be published closer to the time of theAudius main network launch, and these fees and bondscan be modi ed in the Audius governance protocol.

      should be done already...

    1. Many of these metro areas are characterized by low densities and a separation of residential and business construction that forces homes out into the suburbs where transit is either spotty or non-existent. That makes cars necessary for even the most mundane trips.

      cause of problem

    2. The reason is a mix of topography and public policy.

      possible cause of transit problem

    3. Today, U.S. public transportation resembles an elevator that can take you to dozens of floors, but not the one with your desk. The vast majority of Americans live within 3/4 miles of a public transit stop, but 60 percent of metro jobs and low-income housing are in poorly connected suburbs. We've reached a paradox in public transportation, Puentes says: Good transit coverage but poor job access. Across income levels, the paradox is even starker: 89& of low income communities live within 3/4 miles of a transit stop but only 26% of low skill jobs are accessible by public transportation.

      background/main point/problem

    1. according to a new report from transportation research and advocacy organization TransitCenter, riders are even less enthused about public transit than they were two years ago.

      background/problem/agrees with source

    2. Today, many regions have cheap gas, easy-come auto loans, Uber, Lyft, and now a new breed of bike- and scooter-share. So transit users aren’t riding like they used to.

      what caused this problem/source neither agrees nor disagrees, hence the "Don't Blame Uber" in the title

    3. Americans are getting even more into cars. More survey respondents said they had full-time car access today than did two years ago, 54 percent compared with 43 percent. Similarly, the number of respondents who said they didn’t have access to a car decreased, from 27 percent to 21 percent.

      background/what caused this problem

    4. “The broader issue is clearing space for your transit to get through congestion, and most of that congestion is from private cars, not [ride-hail],” says Ben Fried, the group’s communications head. “Cities need to make transit fast, affordable, convenient." Truly attractive transit has to do that better than private cars.

      problem with transit/possible solution to the problem

    5. Transportation advocates argue that the creeping shift from transit to private vehicles isn’t good for cities. It’s not space-efficient: Per passenger, a bus carrying 40 people takes up far less room on the road than a person driving themself to work, as 76 percent of Americans do. Nor is it equitable: Private cars are expensive, and lifting off the pedal of transit investment in favor of car infrastructure leaves lower-income people to suffer with crowded commutes and infrequent service. Then there’s a climate argument: Buses and trains are more emission-friendly than single-occupancy cars. Meeting regions’ climate goals demands cities get better about transit.

      background/helps back up my carbon emission problem

    1. Problem-based learning (PBL) in a growing trend in approaching adult learning, particularly in ESL/ELL classrooms. In this text, the basic principles and methods of PBL for ELL/ESL classes are covered for instructors to implement. Key aspects of PBL include relevance to student lives and the opportunity to practice English in a heterogenous group with the end goal being application to another area of life. Multiple resources are helpful for implementation of PBL including technology. A review of the benefits of PBL is summarized as well as drawbacks with embedded suggestions to resolve possible difficulties. Rating: 8/10

    1. In 2001, AI founder Marvin Minsky asked "So the question is why didn't we get HAL in 2001?"[167] Minsky believed that the answer is that the central problems, like commonsense reasoning, were being neglected, while most researchers pursued things like commercial applications of neural nets or genetic algorithms. John McCarthy, on the other hand, still blamed the qualification problem.[168] For Ray Kurzweil, the issue is computer power and, using Moore's Law, he predicted that machines with human-level intelligence will appear by 2029.[169] Jeff Hawkins argued that neural net research ignores the essential properties of the human cortex, preferring simple models that have been successful at solving simple problems.[170] There were many other explanations and for each there was a corresponding research program underway.
    2. Eventually the earliest successful expert systems, such as XCON, proved too expensive to maintain. They were difficult to update, they could not learn, they were "brittle" (i.e., they could make grotesque mistakes when given unusual inputs), and they fell prey to problems (such as the qualification problem) that had been identified years earlier. Expert systems proved useful, but only in a few special contexts
    1. In 1988 Apple sued Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard on the grounds that they infringed Apple's copyrighted GUI, citing (among other things) the use of rectangular, overlapping, and resizable windows. After four years, the case was decided against Apple, as were later appeals. Apple's actions were criticized by some in the software community, including the Free Software Foundation (FSF), who felt Apple was trying to monopolize on GUIs in general, and boycotted GNU software for the Macintosh platform for seven years.
    1. In 1979, Russell Noftsker, being convinced that Lisp machines had a bright commercial future due to the strength of the Lisp language and the enabling factor of hardware acceleration, proposed to Greenblatt that they commercialize the technology.[citation needed] In a counter-intuitive move for an AI Lab hacker, Greenblatt acquiesced, hoping perhaps that he could recreate the informal and productive atmosphere of the Lab in a real business. These ideas and goals were considerably different from those of Noftsker. The two negotiated at length, but neither would compromise. As the proposed firm could succeed only with the full and undivided assistance of the AI Lab hackers as a group, Noftsker and Greenblatt decided that the fate of the enterprise was up to them, and so the choice should be left to the hackers. The ensuing discussions of the choice divided the lab into two factions. In February 1979, matters came to a head. The hackers sided with Noftsker, believing that a commercial venture fund-backed firm had a better chance of surviving and commercializing Lisp machines than Greenblatt's proposed self-sustaining start-up. Greenblatt lost the battle.
  3. Oct 2019
    1. We see a number of speci c challenges faced by creatorsand listeners today:1. There is little to no transparency around the originsof creator payouts (e.g. number of plays, location,original gross payment before fees)2. Incomplete rights ownership data often preventscontent creators from getting paid; instead, earn-ings accumulate in digital service providers (DSPs)and rights societies3. There are layers of middlemen and signi cant timedelay involved in payments to creators4. Publishing rights are complicated and opaque, withno incentives for the industry to make rights datapublic and accurate5. Remixes, covers, and other derivative content arelargely censored due to rights management issues6. Licensing issues prevent DSPs and content from be-ing accessible worldwide
  4. Sep 2019
    1. The Executive [Lincoln] is frequently compelled to affix his signature to bills of the highest importance, much of which he regards as wholly at war with the national interests.
  5. Aug 2019
    1. “Democrats think it's not progressive enough because it doesn’t put extra burdens on higher-income people, like an income tax does,” Hines says. “And Republicans worry that it's too easy for the government to raise money with one.”
    1. No available HMDs support VirtualLink at this writing, nor are we aware of any, but it's something to keep in mind if you're waffling between a GeForce RTX card and a last-generation GeForce GTX or a Radeon card for VR. Nothing is certain, but it's possible a future headset may debut with this as the optional or mandatory interface.
    1. “Pension funds can’t match their liabilities with where rates are today so they have to hope that equity markets will continue to rally,” he says.
  6. Jul 2019
    1. Kahle has been critical of Google's book digitization, especially of Google's exclusivity in restricting other search engines' digital access to the books they archive. In a 2011 talk Kahle described Google's 'snippet' feature as a means of tip-toeing around copyright issues, and expressed his frustration with the lack of a decent loaning system for digital materials. He said the digital transition has moved from local control to central control, non-profit to for-profit, diverse to homogeneous, and from "ruled by law" to "ruled by contract". Kahle stated that even public-domain material published before 1923, and not bound by copyright law, is still bound by Google's contracts and requires permission to be distributed or copied. Kahle reasoned that this trend has emerged for a number of reasons: distribution of information favoring centralization, the economic cost of digitizing books, the issue of library staff without the technical knowledge to build these services, and the decision of the administrators to outsource information services
    1. It is critical to understand that within systems, there is no isolation from the context, though we often view context as the invisible elephant in the room. When context is not addressed explicitly, equity issues are overlooked, and conversations about diversity in the science curriculum become only necessary for the poor, or students of color, or bilingual students. Issues of equity and context must be integrated in a wider systemic approach for the implementation of the NGSS to be deemed useful. We have to allow for boundary crossing and interdisciplinary connections into domains that make context and students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, girls, students of cultural and linguistic diversity, and students in urban, suburban, and rural areas want to engage in science and see themselves in science. We believe that a culturally responsive approach to the implementation of the NGSS will achieve this goal.

      It would be amazing to re-conceptualize the problem/s identified here using Popper's/Bereiter's 3-world ontology, specifically the affordances provided by World-3. W3 is 'inhabited by' abstract knowledge objects (aka cultural artifacts) created, worked-on, ignored, fought-over and rejected...or transformed/improved. The standards conceptualized like this and then engaging communities to develop relationships with these objects, apply and 'improve' them in their own worlds, as innovators, as professionals... This is a way to frame addressing the problem of 'implementation' of standards because, "...within systems, there is no isolation from the context..." This idea/description might need further development.

    2. Within the vignette and the experiences of the four teachers, there is a fundamental equity and diversity issue that is shared among them: whose responsibility is it to address equity and diversity? How do we address it in science and within our particular contexts, and with our particular student populations? What supports must be present to allow us to promote equity and diversity in our teaching, learning, and curriculum? What supports are present in the NGSS to assist all teachers to teach in culturally responsive ways so that teachers meet the educational science needs of all students? Our position and the ways in which we address these questions center on implementation of the NGSS with equity and diversity as theoretical and pedagogical foundations to science teaching. In this way, equity and diversity becomes a vision and goal for implementation.

      and my position is, how can we instantiate classrooms (ie communities of students) such that they have the agency and abilities to self-organize and tackle deep, "wicked problems" of such fundamental importance as this. In solving this science/equity problem, let's aim 1 level higher/deeper/further and also focus on transforming education to prepare children to care about and have the abilities to 'solve' problems such as this as they grow.

    3. How will all educators and society have a deliberate coming together to envision equity as a guiding framework for the implementation of NGSS?

      question interrogates problem of... wow, hard for me to encapsulate in a sentence. How about: Us teachers and other stakeholders need to engage in dialogue/action around equity and NGSS in our own local connections yet be aware of and engage with other local dialogues and furthermore transform/be-transformed-by the emerging, higher level discourse. np

    4. Equity and diversity have not been a dominant focus of previous national reform initiatives in science education (Rodriguez, 1997)

      color blind...

    1. The reason for this is that HyperCard is an echo of a different world. One where the distinction between the “use” and “programming” of a computer has been weakened and awaits near-total erasure.  A world where the personal computer is a mind-amplifier, and not merely an expensive video telephone.  A world in which Apple’s walled garden aesthetic has no place. What you may not know is that Steve Jobs killed far greater things than HyperCard.  He was almost certainly behind the death of SK8. And the Lisp Machine version of the Newton. And we may never learn what else. And Mr. Jobs had a perfectly logical reason to prune the Apple tree thus. He returned the company to its original vision: the personal computer as a consumer appliance, a black box enforcing a very traditional relationship between the vendor and the purchaser. Jobs supposedly claimed that he intended his personal computer to be a “bicycle for the mind.” But what he really sold us was a (fairly comfortable) train for the mind. A train which goes only where rails have been laid down, like any train, and can travel elsewhere only after rivers of sweat pour forth from armies of laborers. (Preferably in Cupertino.) The Apple of Steve Jobs needed HyperCard-like products like the Monsanto Company needs a $100 home genetic-engineering set. The Apple of today, lacking Steve Jobs — probably needs a stake through the heart.
    1. Every English class starts with a moment of quiet after which students are asked to share their energy and stress levels.

      important: I think this idea could help some students realize they are not alone in their feelings and that there are a diversity of feelings and mindsets (that change on the daily) in the classroom.

    2. In English, juniors are grouped with seniors, which helps the younger students learn how the process works by watching and learning from the older students

      there is plenty of research backing the idea that students can benefit academically and personally from learning from older/ more experienced peers

    3. on the mathematical process and not just the “right answer.”

      so crucial to actually understanding the math, and not just focusing on "being done" or "getting the right answer". Much more sustainable approach to teaching math.

    4. group tests, which, like the class worksheets, are designed to be harder than the individual assignment

      group tests need to be based on critical thinking in order to achieve the collaborative aspect of learning

    5. effective classroom geography, focus on the process, build accountability, let students teach one another, and encourage students to be in tune with one another.

      teacher taking a step back; reminds me of Deweyian philosophy

    6. resilient by aiding them with identifying their resources (peers) and testing their theories to see if they are on the right track all while developing habits of mind that form the foundation of scholarship.

      using peers to solve problems rather than directly consulting teacher for answer

    1. One way to look at this is that when a new powerful medium of expression comes along that was not enough in our genes to be part of traditional cultures, it is something we need to learn how to get fluent with and use. Without the special learning, the new media will be mostly used to automate the old forms of thought. This will also have effects, especially if the new media is more efficient at what the old did: this can result in gluts, that act like legal drugs (as indeed are the industrial revolution’s ability to create sugar and fat, it can also overproduce stories, news, status, and new ways for oral discourse.
    2. To understand what has happened, we only need to look at the history of writing and printing to note two very different consequences (a) the first, a vast change over the last 450 years in how the physical and social worlds are dealt with via the inventions of modern science and governance, and (b) that most people who read at all still mostly read fiction, self-help and religion books, and cookbooks, etc.* (all topics that would be familiar to any cave-person).
    1. I do not actually know of a real findability index, but tools in the field of information retrieval could be applied to develop one. One of the unsolved problems in the field is how to help the searcher to determine if the information simply is not available.
    1. Unfortunately, misguided views about usability still cause significant damage in today's world. In the 2000 U.S. elections, poor ballot design led thousands of voters in Palm Beach, Florida to vote for the wrong candidate, thus turning the tide of the entire presidential election. At the time, some observers made the ignorant claim that voters who could not understand the Palm Beach butterfly ballot were not bright enough to vote. I wonder if people who made such claims have never made the frustrating "mistake" of trying to pull open a door that requires pushing. Usability experts see this kind of problem as an error in the design of the door, rather than a problem with the person trying to leave the room.
  7. Jun 2019
    1. The term first appeared in 1984 as the topic of a public debate at the annual meeting of AAAI (then called the "American Association of Artificial Intelligence"). It is a chain reaction that begins with pessimism in the AI community, followed by pessimism in the press, followed by a severe cutback in funding, followed by the end of serious research.[2] At the meeting, Roger Schank and Marvin Minsky—two leading AI researchers who had survived the "winter" of the 1970s—warned the business community that enthusiasm for AI had spiraled out of control in the 1980s and that disappointment would certainly follow. Three years later, the billion-dollar AI industry began to collapse.
  8. May 2019
    1. Cities such as Lubumbashi and Likasi face serious air pollution because of the thousands of trucks that travel to and from the mines throughout the day. Chronic exposure to such dusts can lead to severe lung diseases. Water is unfit for human consumption and agriculture because soil and water in the immediate vicinity of the mines are polluted by discharges of wastewater.
    1. Stannell says due to freezing, a leak occurred in the water pipeline that services the tailings facility, resulting in approximately 850 cubic meters of process water spewing from the pipeline

      cold weather can cause pipe lines the break.

    2. An investigation continues into what led to a large volume of contaminated water being leaked from the Highland Valley Copper Mine near Logan Lake.

      The Highland Valley copper mine in Canada leaked polluted water into near by lake.

    1. Codelco is a state-owned Chilean mining company and the world’s largest copper producer. Based on their annual report and USGS statistics, they produced ~10% of the world’s copper in 2015 and own 8% of global reserves. They are also a large producer of greenhouse gas emissions. Last year, Codelco produced 3,2 t CO2e/millions tmf from both indirect and direct effects, and in 2011 it consumed 12% of the total national electricity supply.

      Goddamn they should start recylcling

    2. What can Codelco do, then? In addition to cost cutting, Codelco could consider entering the recycling copper industry, as energy prices are driving “virgin” copper costs up.

      thats good

    3. copper mining significantly contributes to climate change.
    1. Although few in number, the multinational mining companies that are earning billion-dollar profits in Zambia have had a massive impact on its environment and people.
  9. Apr 2019
    1. PBL) isan instructional method in which students lear

      Problem based learning is an instructional method in which students learn through facilitated problem solving. Problem based curricula provide students with guided experience in learning through solving complex, real-world problems. Rating: 9/10

    1. Playing games with my brother taught me that connections can be made with another person through virtual reality. Things like cooperation, shared problem-solving, and communication in gaming can strengthen relationships. Most importantly, gaming taught me that no matter the differences between me and another person, we can find common ground through play.
  10. Mar 2019
    1. problem based learning This gives a brief overview of problem based learning. This is a teaching method in which learners receive an ill structured problem that they continue to define and then solve. This web page serves as an overview but if one were teaching with this approach, more information would be needed than is contained on the typical introductory web page. Rating 3/5

    1. This is better than the problem-based learning page I already posted so I will post this one too. it is easy to read and gives the instructional designer or teacher a quick and better-than-average explanation about problem based learning, which is a method of teaching in which learners form teams and learn through solving real problems. rating 4/5

    1. Teaching problem solving This page is included because some of our theories indicate that problem solving should be taught specifically. This page is a bit unusual; I did not find many others like it. It is rather easy to read and also addresses the differences between novice and expert learners. rating 3/5

  11. Feb 2019
    1. In a 2011 Reddit IAmA, Jennings recalled how in 2004 the Democratic politicians Chuck Schumer and Harry Reid unsuccessfully asked Jennings to run for the United States Senate from Utah. Jennings commented, "That was when I realized the Democratic Party was f@#$ed in '04."[19]
    1. 1. Explore the current situation. Paint a picture in words by including the “presenting problem,” the impact it is having, the consequences of not solving the problem, and the emotions the problem is creating for those involved.

      This step is somewhat similar to the EEC (Evidence/Example Effect Change/Challenge) model, often used with Feedback?

  12. Oct 2018
    1. When compared to more traditional methods where students passively receive information from a teacher, cooperative, problem-based learning has been shown to improve student engagement and retention of classroom material

      Students are thinking and engaging with the material on a deeper level when they work together in a collaborative setting. They can talk out the problems, get feedback from each other, and build on each others ideas to get the answers.

  13. Jul 2018
    1. Additionally, there is work available in most countries for people living outside the US, but only workers in the US and India can withdraw cash. Workers from other countries can only redeem their earnings through Amazon gift cards.
  14. Jun 2018
    1. Basically, all token pitches include a line that goes something like this: "There is a fixed supply of tokens. As demand for the token increases, so must the price." This logic fails to take into account the velocity problem
    1. The first practical problem with velocity is that it’s frequently employed as a catch-all to make the two sides of the equation of exchange balance. It often simply captures the error in our estimation of the other variables in the model.
    1. In this kind of situation one might well ask: why continue to make the 80 per cent of products that only generate 20 per cent of profits? Companies rarely ask these questions, perhaps because to answer them would mean very radical action: to stop doing four-fifths of what you are doing is not a trivial change.

      Relevant on larger scale of global economies.

    2. Certainly, the principle brings home what may be evident anyway: that there is a tragic amount of waste everywhere, in the way that nature operates, in business, in society and in our own lives. If the typical pattern is for 80 per cent of results to come from 20 per cent of inputs, it is necessarily typical too that 80 per cent, the great majority, of inputs are having only a marginal—20 per cent—impact.
    1. "When tasks require high coordination because the work is highly interdependent, having more contributors can increase process losses, reducing the effectiveness of the group below what individual members could optimally accomplish". Having a team too large the overall effectiveness may suffer even when the extra contributors increase the resources. In the end the overall costs from coordination might overwhelm other costs.
    2. While modern systems benefit from larger group size, the serialized process has been found to introduce substantial noise that distorts the collective output of the group. In one significant study of serialized collective intelligence, it was found that the first vote contributed to a serialized voting system can distort the final result by 34%
    1. Remark1.73.IfPandQare total orders andf:P!Qand1:Q!Pare drawn witharrows bending as in Exercise 1.72, we believe thatfis left adjoint to1iff the arrows donot cross. But we have not proved this, mainly because it is difficult to state precisely,and the total order case is not particularly general
    1. At present, merging ontologies that are not developed from a common upper ontology is a largely manual process and therefore time-consuming and expensive.
    1. When users can freely choose tags (creating a folksonomy, as opposed to selecting terms from a controlled vocabulary), the resulting metadata can include homonyms (the same tags used with different meanings) and synonyms (multiple tags for the same concept), which may lead to inappropriate connections between items and inefficient searches for information about a subject.
    2. Tagging systems open to the public are also open to tag spam, in which people apply an excessive number of tags or unrelated tags to an item (such as a YouTube video) in order to attract viewers. This abuse can be mitigated using human or statistical identification of spam items.[48] The number of tags allowed may also be limited to reduce spam.
    1. Promised partnerships with major news media organizations never materialized, except in the case of The Washington Post’s Fix blog, which still occasionally uses the platform to annotate the news.
    2. But the biggest problem with the annotator from Genius’ perspective is that few individuals are using it. After more than two years of development, the Chrome extension has only 12,320 users. It was last updated in June 2016.
    3. But it faced a storm of criticism last year after some writers complained the tool was being used to harass them. The annotator also raised concerns that it could have been used to inject malicious code onto visitors’ computers, though it’s since been tweaked to address that vulnerability.
    1. One concern in the Decred community is that the rising ticket price (about 100 DCR, as of mid-2018) excludes small holders from participating in governance and block validation.
    2. Further, the lack of clear development funding methods in Bitcoin is often seen as problematic. The core network software exists as open source code on Github, but it is difficult for developers to directly monetize their contributions to the codebase. Funding for Bitcoin Core developers was entirely donation driven until 2014.
    3. Bitcoin has no formal governance structure, and decisions to alter the protocol are made entirely off-chain, typically by insiders/early adopters and heads of large mining operations.
    1. Recent studies have indicated that Uber’s U.S. driver churn has sharply increased this year, to rates as high as 96%. Needless to say, it’s hard (and costly) to maintain double-digit growth rates, when only 4% of mission critical, de facto employees stay on the job for more than a year.
    2. In fact, Uber has struggled to achieve market share leadership in many large foreign markets, including China, India, SE Asia and Brazil. Moreover, while network effects do exist within each metro market, the benefits are significantly weakened by extremely low switching costs, which enable drivers and riders to utilize whichever ridesharing service offers the best deal on any given trip.
    1. The Achilles’ heel of Uber and Lyft is their centralized management of pricing. This week's uproar by drivers — and their willingness to join an alternative — shows the failure of that approach. You cannot build a long-term relationship with drivers if you are taking away their ability to set their own pricing. Arcade City will decentralize those decisions to the level of the driver and their customers.
    1. Non-cooperative companies solve this problem by taking up front capital and using that to subsidize one or both sides of the marketplace – guaranteeing fees to musicians and doing lots of marketing to recruit users. Cooperatives lack this up front capital, making it hard to get started.
  15. Nov 2017
  16. Sep 2017
    1. whenever I want to use my tablet it's rarely charged there always wants lots of updates

    1. I have a bunch of junk tags from when I thought tags were separated by spaces; they keep popping up in the autocomplete list -- at the top, no less.

      Sort autocomplete by most-used?

      let me delete tags? (maybe I haven't looked hard enough?)

    2. can't sort my profile by creation date?

    1. projectors refer to “people who find a way out of their difficulties by coming up with novel ideas” (Novak, 2008, p. 3)

    Tags

    Annotators

  17. Jul 2017
    1. In short, online reading compre-hension is online research. Second, online reading also becomes tightly integrated with writing as we communicate with others to learn more about the questions we explore and as we communicate our own inter-pretations. A third difference is that new technologies such as browsers, search engines, wikis, blogs, e-mail, and many others are required. Addi-tional skills and strategies are needed to use each of these technologies effectively

      Literacy, in general, is not simply knowing how to read read text. It also extends to know what to do what the information you acquire from reading. Reading also encompasses underatanding. For example, underatanding traffic lights and signs are a type of literacy that not involve text, but they communicate meaning that you need to know how to read and synthesize into action.

  18. Jun 2017
  19. May 2017
  20. Apr 2017
    1. herhetormustbeabletoenterintoanindeterminatesitua-tionanddiscloseorformulateproblemstherein;hemustalsopresenttheproblemsinsuchawayastofacilitatetheirresolu-tionbytheaudienceengagedwithhimintherhetoricalprocess

      Does rhetoric necessarily mean always presenting problems? That seems a bit restrictive, or maybe my idea of problem is restrictive. I would think that presenting something as noble or as having absolutely no problems would also be a rhetorical task.

  21. Mar 2017
    1. In this solution, we used memoization to recursively calculate the solutions for subproblems which we then used to calculate the solutions to larger problems. Alternatively, tabulation could have been used to build up solutions from the bottom up.

      So, from the whole thing I take it that the problem has actually two parts: i.) a pre-processing part in which all paths have been explored (via memoization), and, ii). discover the optimal path to take, given the memoization table.

  22. Jan 2017
    1. Affiliations— memberships, formal and informal, in online communities centeredaround various forms of media, such as Friendster, Facebook, message boards,metagaming, game clans, or MySpace).Expressions— producing new creative forms, such as digital sampling, skinning andmodding, fan videomaking, fan fiction writing, zines, mash-ups).Collaborative Problem-solving— working together in teams, formal and informal,to complete tasks and develop new knowledge (such as through Wikipedia, alternativereality gaming, spoiling).Circulations — Shaping the flow of media (such as podcasting, blogging).

      It is very interesting to see just how applicable those terms are for our everyday life!

    1. If I were to return to university in pursuit of an education degree, for example, I would invariably be required to begin this slackly sojourn with such courses as Introduction to Education 101.

      He's saying that it isn't always necessary to sit through classes. Some classes don't matter.

  23. Dec 2016
  24. Sep 2016
    1. Alejandro Farias, 23, from Brownsville, Tex., a supervisor for a freight company, sees himself simply as Latino. His ancestors came from the United States, Mexico and Portugal. When pressed, he checked “some other race.”

      This is a problem because so many people are not getting recognized and many don't even take the test.

    1. “It’s more complicated than that.” No kidding. You could nail a list of caveats to any sentence in this essay. But the complexity of these problems is no excuse for inaction. It’s an invitation to read more, learn more, come to understand the situation, figure out what you can build, and go build it. That’s why this essay has 400 hyperlinks. It’s meant as a jumping-off point. Jump off it. There’s one overarching caveat. This essay employed the rhetoric of “problem-solving” throughout. I was trained as an engineer; engineers solve problems. But, at least for the next century, the “problem” of climate change will not be “solved” — it can only be “managed”. This is a long game. One more reason to be thinking about tools, infrastructure, and foundations. The next generation has some hard work ahead of them.

      Also a good foot note related with the ones at beginning. A problem solving language doesn't mean to be enchanted by the magic of techno-solutionism. It can be an invitation from a particular point of view to action and dialogue. This seems the case here. Thanks Bret.

  25. May 2016
    1. sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration

      This worked well for me with a Dell Vostro 3550 and Ubuntu Server 14.04.4 virtualised inside VirtualBox (Version 5.0.16 r105871). When you run this command, the shell will present the configurator and the choices this user recommends are valid mostly. By contrast, I chose the Dell SK-8125 as a reasonably close match to the Vostro 3550. I also set the left Alt key to function as the AltGr key and this solved the problem. Now, if I want to type the pipe ( | ) character, I use the key combination

      ALT+~
      

      This is not the most intuitive solution; but it works!

    1. in every community or organization, there are a few individuals or groups whoseuncommon but successful behaviors and strategies have enabled them to find better solutions to problems than their neighbors who face the same challenges and barriersand have access to same resources.
  26. Jan 2016
    1. Ecocide

      Interesting idea. The only thing is that the science is not where we would like it to be. Most of the accusing will need to be done in retrospect. In that case, many will have lost culpability due to insufficient knowledge. I just wonder how this will hold up in a court of law for most practical cases. For some large-scale cases, I can see it working, as long as the effects are enormous.

  27. Dec 2015
    1. Edward R. O'Neill

      • When someone asks for help solving a problem, they've probably already thought about it to the point of frustration.
      • They need a fresh perspective.
      • They may not have a clear idea what the problem is.
      • They may have defined the problem incorrectly.
      • Problem solving often requires periods of mind-wandering -- forgetting about the problem, and letting the mind make free connections.
      • They may be so focused on the problem that they aren't allowing their mind to wander.
      • One way to help them is by "leading them to positive, hopeful, self-focused daydreams about their goals."
  28. Jul 2015
  29. May 2015
    1. some farmers will get water, and others will not, simply based on when their land was first irrigated.

      This is not fair because farmers weren't told before hand, and so some farmers are lucky while others are not. The situation in which the farmers are in is very perilous, and people with the most water will be able to make the most profit. That will mean that there will be a shortage of fruits and vegetables in the states and it is bad.

    2. Taking that water and dividing it up some other way, he says, would be like taking everyone's paycheck, putting it into a pool, and saying: "We're going to divide that up evenly. Even though you went to school as a doctor for eight or 10 years, and you're making a lot more money than the guy who's driving a school bus, let's take all the money and divide it up evenly."

      People with greater education will not be different compared to others when it comes to salary. If one farmer has lots of water because he is responsible and resourceful, while some other farmer has little water because he is lazy, ultimately both will have the same amount of water. It is unfair for resourceful farmers, and thus shows that you do not have to work hard to gather water because everyone will eventually have the same amount of water.

  30. Mar 2015
    1. If things go wrong, do not sweep them aside. Confront the problems, get to the root of the difficulties, and wrestle with these resolutely. Go for long-term success, and do not be deterred by criticisms.
  31. Jan 2014
    1. common appropriation regimes do not give a complete answer to the sustainability of motivation and organization for the truly open, large-scale nonproprietary peer production projects we see on the Internet.

      Towards the end of our last conversation the text following "common appropriation" seemed an interesting place to dive into further for our future discussions.

      I have tagged this annotation with "meta" because it is a comment about our discussion and where to continue it rather than an annotation focused on the content itself.

      In the future I would be interested in exploring the idea of "annotation types" that can be selectively turned on and off, but for now will handle that with ad hoc tags like "meta".