46 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2023
    1. @chrisaldrich thank you for this detailed response about your use of Obsidian and organization for digital Zettelkasten. I am not sure if this is the current forum or discussion to ask this but I would be curious to see how you have integrated or coordinated your analog Zettelkasten and notetaking with what you describe here. I've followed your posts about the use of index cards for a long time. I'd love to see how you use the very different affordances of these environments together.

      reply to u/wtagg at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/16wgq4l/comment/k356507/?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=web2x&context=3

      Perhaps the easiest way to frame things is that I use my digital note taking as scaffolding in the learning and research process and the zettels in the digital space are the best filtered outcomes from some of that. If you compare my practice to that of Luhmann's one might consider most of my digital practice to be equivalent to his ZKI. Most of my analog practice is more highly focused and deliberate and is more closely limited to a small handful of topics related to my specific areas of research on memory, orality, intellectual history, Indigenous studies, education, anthropology, and mathematics (and is potentially more like Luhmann's ZK II). As a result, in hindsight—thanks for asking—, I'm simultaneously building my ZK I and ZK II instead of switching mid-career the way Luhmann did. But to be clear, a lot of my ZKII material filters (or digests, if you prefer that analogy) its way through the ZKI process along the way.

  2. Aug 2023
    1. Nieuws kwam tot ons via een combinatie van kranten, bladen en radio of tv. Papieren media hadden het te doen met beperkte fysieke ruimte omdat papier geld kost, ook iets weegt en meer papier is ook nog duurder te vervoeren. Bij radio- en tv-zenders was het niet anders door beperkte tijd, een beperkt aantal kanalen en zeer hoge kosten. Dus een redactie maakte een beperkte selectie voor ons: een filter.Ook informatie-uitwisseling onderling ging per post en ook dat was bewerkelijk en bepaald niet gratis. Iets dergelijks gold eigenlijk voor alle vormen van informatie die tot ons kwam.En sinds een tijdje worden die filters minder belangrijk of ze verdwijnen compleet. Het zelf massaal verspreiden van (nep-)nieuws en andere informatie kost niets meer, dus iedereen kan iedereen onbeperkt bekogelen met extreme hoeveelheden informatie.In veel gevallen is er geen enkel filter meer op die toestroom van informatie. En al is dat filter er wel, dan moet je dat zelf maar zien in te stellen. Of, nog erger, het filter is er, maar functioneert niet in jouw belang en is daarmee onbetrouwbaar

      info filters niet meer ingebouwd in het systeem; dat moeten we nu zelf zien te creëeren, of deze worden anders voor ons gemaakt (zie bijvoorbeeld algoritmes, enzo)

  3. Jul 2023
    1. Isn’t it too much time and energy consuming? I’m not provoking, I’m genuine.

      reply to IvanCyb at https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/1587onp/comment/jt8zbu4/?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=web2x&context=3 Asking broadly about indexing methods in zettelkasten

      When you begin you'll find yourself creating lots of index entries to start, in part because you have none, but you'll find with time that you need to do less and less because index entries already exist for most of what you would add. More importantly most of the entries you might consider duplicating are likely to be very near cards that already have those index entries.

      As an example if you have twenty cards on cultural anthropology, the first one will be indexed with "cultural anthropology" to give you a pointer of where to start. Then when you need to add a new card to that section, you'll look up "cultural anthropology" and skim through what you've got to find the closest related card and place it. You likely won't need to create a new index entry for it at all.

      But for argument's sake, let's say you intend to do some work at the intersection of "cultural anthropology" and "writing" and this card is also about "writing". Then you might want to add an index entry for "writing" from which you'll branch off in the future. This will tend to keep your index very sparse. As an example you can look at Niklas Luhmann's digitized collection to notice that he spent his career in the area of "sociology" but there are only just a few pointers from his index into his collection under that keyword. If he had tagged every single card related to "sociology" as "sociology" in his index, the index entry for it would have been wholly unusable in just a few months. Broadly speaking his entire zettelkasten is about sociology, so you need to delve a few layers in and see which subtopics, sub-subtopics, sub-sub-subtopics, etc. exist. As you go deeper into specific topics you'll notice that you branch down and out into more specific subareas as you begin to cover all the bases within that topic. If you like, for fun, you can see this happening in my digital zettelkasten on the topic of "zettelkasten" at https://hypothes.is/users/chrisaldrich?q=tag%3A%22zettelkasten%22. The tool only shows the top 50 tags for that subject in the side bar, but you can slowly dig down into subtopics to see what they look like and a bit of how they begin to overlap.

      Incidentally, this is one of the problems with those who tag everything with top level topic headings in digital contexts—you do a search for something important and find so much that it becomes a useless task to try to sift through it all. As a result, users need better tools to give them the ability to do more fine-grained searching, filtering, and methods of discovery.

  4. May 2023
    1. Get some of the lowest ad prices while protecting your brand with a system backed by Verity and Grapeshot. Rest easy that your ads will only show up where you’d like them to.

      Is there a word or phrase in the advertising space which covers the filtering out of websites and networks which have objectionable material one doesn't want their content running against?

      Contextual intelligence seems to be one...

      Apparently the platforms Verity and Grapeshot (from Oracle) protect against this.

    1. We will eventually find it absurd that anyone would browse the “raw web” without their personal model filtering it.

      yes, it already is that way in effect.

  5. Mar 2023
    1. Abb. 9 Im Normalfall erarbeitete man jedoch eine detaillierte interne Feinsortierung des Belegmaterials häufiger Wörter. Naturgemäß hätte jede Dimension der Analyse (chronologisch, grammatisch, semantisch, graphisch) die Grundlage einer eigenen Sortierordnung bilden können.

      Alternate sort orders for the slips for the Wb include chronological, grammatical, semantic, and graphic, but for teasing out the meanings the original sort order was sufficient. Certainly other sort orders may reveal additional subtleties.

    1. The beauty of FAST framework Overloaded with information → Filter Drowning in busywork → Automate Descending into chaos → Structure Doing things over and over → Templatize

      The beauty of FAST framework<br><br>Overloaded with information → Filter<br><br>Drowning in busywork → Automate<br><br>Descending into chaos → Structure<br><br>Doing things over and over → Templatize pic.twitter.com/kn6Gi27DLG

      — Andrew Altshuler (@1eo) February 4, 2023
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
  6. Feb 2023
    1. If you close the report without explicitly clearing the filters, Access remembers them and you can click Toggle Filter again to reapply them next time you open the report. This works even if you close and reopen the database. However, if you click Home > Advanced > Clear All Filters, Access clears the filters completely and you’ll need to start from scratch next time around.

      Interesting to know how Access saves the filter you wrote.

    1. Searching is the #1 task that a user has to do. I will say this again:Searching is the #1 task that a user has to do.

      Keep reading. Maybe this has to do with server filtering. I don't know. But it seems interesting so ...

    1. In the example(s), Mypass is a SQL pass-through query you created. You simply create one working PT query, and then you can (usually) then use that one PT query anytime you want raw T-SQL or to run a store procedure 100% server side. So we are in effect overwriting and re-using that one PT query anytime we want raw SQL to run server side.

      This tells how Access has changed over the years and how different it is from the version I worked with ages ago.

    2. Now for running and executing store procedures, or say a sql update to “many” rows, then you most certainly want to use a pass through query, since processing of records does occur local client side.

      So, it's important to research and learn about pass-through queries.

    3. And AGAIN a SIMPLE USE of the “where” clause will result in sql server view ONLY sending down records that meet the criteria you set via the Access built in “where” clause.

      So, building the where clause when opening forms/report is one of the best ways to go.

    4. So placing forms! Expressions inside of a query always been a bad idea since then the query is now “married” to some silly form.

      Wouldn't myself imagined this. But it's very the very truth. The query becomes attached to the form. You can not use it anywhere else!!! And this is the way I was doing this ...

    5. You can change the SQL string in the pass-through QueryDef and specify the Form field:

      So, this is a way to execute that query on the sql server side. Would it be difficult to implement?

    6. Second, would be to pass a SQL string from Access to SQL Server (pass-through query) and have it execute on the SQL Server side.

      Ok, so we need to do some research about pass-trhrough queries. Do they execute on the server?

    7. You can make these changes 100% inside of Access, and not have to really use anything SQL server side to achieve this goal.

      This is just wonderful. Just need to work on the Access (client) side. No need to affect the server side (always more difficult to work with)

    1. WhereCondition Optional Variant A string expression that's a valid SQL WHERE clause without the word WHERE.

      According to what I read, this Where clause goes to the server and applies there. So, we just have to do what we do in js: open a filter form first, build a filter from there and then open the form with that filter (with no Where word).

      Doing that, it's sql server who picks up that filter and applies it server side!!! Just what we need ...

    1. Essentially, sorting and filtering are tools that let you organize your data. When you sort data, you are putting it in order. Filtering data lets you hide unimportant data and focus only on the data you're interested in.

      Some inputs about sorting and filtering in an Access Database.

  7. Jan 2023
    1. hat you need is to filter on the count of the number of races for each horse. The HAVING clause does exactly what we need here – it has syntax like the WHERE clause, but it is applied to each group after grouping has taken place

      Main diff between HAVING and WHERE

        • WHERE is applied before grouping, it is usually used to narrow the SELECT statement's output
        • HAVING is applied after grouping. It is usually used when grouping is needed to incorporate function generated values into a new table requested by the query
  8. Nov 2022
    1. If you can’t talk yourself into using your energy to write or type something out, it’s probably not worth capturing.

      Being willing to capture an idea by spending the time writing it out in full is an incredibly strong indicator that it is actually worth capturing. Often those who use cut and paste or other digital means for their note capture will over-collect because the barrier is low and simple.

      More often than not, if one doesn't have some sort of barrier for capturing notes, they will become a burden and ultimately a scrap heap of generally useless ideas.

      In the end, experience will eventually dictate one's practice as, over time, one will develop an internal gut feeling of what is really worth collecting and what isn't. Don't let your not having this at the beginning deter you. Collect and process and over time, you'll balance out what is useful.

  9. Oct 2022
    1. I can't quite grasp this concept, although it seems interesting for my specific case. Isn't the index box supposed to be organized by alphabetical order? How can personal notes be placed right in such an order?

      los2pollos reply to: https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/y5un81/comment/it667sq/?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=web2x&context=3

      There are a wide variety of methods of organizing and sorting one's note cards including by topic (usually alphabetical), by date, by idea, by author, by title, etc.

      If you're using it as a diary, you'd probably keep that subsection in order by date written, and then potentially have it cross indexed by subject if those things were important to you.

      If you kept other information like mood, health, activities, exercise, glasses of water per day (for example) on them, you could resort and re-order them by those data as well if you liked. And naturally, this ability to resort/reorder one's notes has been one of the greatest features and affordances to these systems historically.

  10. Apr 2022
    1. …and they are typically sorted: chronologically: newest items are displayed firstthrough data: most popular, trending, votesalgorithmically: the system determines what you see through your consumption patterns and what it wants you to seeby curation: humans determine what you seeby taxonomy: content is displayed within buckets of categories, like Wikipedia Most media entities employ a combination of the above.

      For reading richer, denser texts what is the best way of ordering and sorting it?

      Algorithmically sorting with a pseudo-chronological sort is the best method for social media content, but what is the most efficient method for journal articles? for books?

    1. On Zettel 9/8a2 he called the Zettelkasten "eine Klärgrube" or a "septic tank;" (perhaps even "cesspool"). Waste goes in, and gets separated from the clearer stuff.

      Niklas Luhmann analogized his zettelkasten to a septic tank. You put in a lot of material, a lot of seemingly waste, and it allows a process of settling and filtering to allow the waste to be separated and distill into something useful.

  11. Aug 2021
    1. Building on platforms' stores of user-generated content, competing middleware services could offer feeds curated according to alternate ranking, labeling, or content-moderation rules.

      Already I can see too many companies relying on artificial intelligence to sort and filter this material and it has the ability to cause even worse nth degree level problems.

      Allowing the end user to easily control the content curation and filtering will be absolutely necessary, and even then, customer desire to do this will likely loose out to the automaticity of AI. Customer laziness will likely win the day on this, so the design around it must be robust.

    2. Francis Fukuyama has called "middleware": content-curation services that could give users more control over the material they see on internet platforms such as Facebook or Twitter.
  12. Jul 2021
  13. Apr 2021
    1. This post articulates a lot of what I've been thinking about for the past 18 months or so, but it adds the additional concept of community integration.

      Interestingly, this aligns with the early, tentative ideas around what the future of In Beta might look like as a learning community, rather than a repository of content.

  14. Nov 2020
    1. Egress filtering involves monitoring egress traffic to detect signs of malicious activity. If malicious activity is suspected or detected, transfers can be blocked to prevent sensitive data loss. Egress filtering can also limit egress traffic and block attempts at high volume data egress.
  15. Sep 2020
  16. Aug 2020
    1. We've introduced new ways to leverage tags to find the games you'll love. Tags now show a preview of how many results will be returned, making it easier to see which are most relevant to your search. By popular demand, it's also possible to exclude tags from your search. If you're a fan of survival games, but not horror or zombies, you can now search to your exact taste.
    2. We've heard from you that it can be frustrating to browse through search results that include a lot of games you already know about. Our new filters allow you to hide games that are ignored, wishlisted, or already in your library. These controls can be enabled or disabled without reloading your search, and their settings are preserved between searches.
    3. Search now supports setting a maximum price, and a filter to only see special offers. If you're looking for a game in your budget, or hoping to discover just the right thing during a sale, this control will help you find the games you want.
  17. Apr 2020
  18. Nov 2019
  19. Aug 2016
    1. 30 acceptable use policies at such institutions.

      Hey do you know how many of those places have a faculty union? I wonder if that makes a diff in minimizing the amount of filtering.

    2. any of us can ask about the policies and technologies that filter our access and track our interactions

      Get busy! Ask your librarians. There are ways to overcome some of those barriers to information access even if you can't move your administrators to change policies right away.

    3. The instructor has predetermined processes and goals

      This article implies that all community college instructors are sheep who only care about workforce training. That has been my experience.

    4. revenge porn

      I am a community college librarian. I just checked and there are 784 items on revenge porn available via the library. I'm not on campus right now - but I will be sure to check what happens with a Google search next time I'm at work.

  20. Jan 2016
    1. by URL

      Is there a way to filter by domain? I'm trying to use hypothes.is in a high school class to get students to annotate pages on my own site. I can't count on them to use consistent tagging, but if I could filter all annotations from my entire domain I could get a useful stream of the students' work.