12 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2016
    1. Library (originally from Mozilla) for building components based on the W3C Web Components specs

    1. A Web Component that can be used to pull fragments of HTML from the server and replace some placeholder content in the page once the fragment loads.

  2. youtube.github.io youtube.github.io
    1. Framework for fast PE-navigation by updating just sections of a page that change during navigation, rather than reloading the whole page.

    1. An experimental performance comparison of client and server-side templating on desktop and mobile, focusing on time to first paint and time to last paint metrics.

      The server is written in Go. The client is the simplest possible client-side templating you can do (using a <template> element and a few DOM API calls), so no frameworks involved.

      Some takeaways:

      • Everything on mobile is ~5x slower than desktop
      • For small amounts of data, there is little difference in time to first paint
      • Server-side rendering generates a modestly larger HTML payload vs. sending JSON down to the client
      • Time to first paint is faster for SSR as the client can render markup as it is streaming down, but this is only significant when there is a decent amount of data on the page
    1. Server-rendered markup can be progressively enhanced as element definitions are registered and upgraded by the browser.

      Question - How is the server-rendering done and in what language?

    1. I came across this from a post reflecting on the last Chrome summit.

      The splash pages which appear to be basic static content with little interactivity load a 1.5MB JS bundle (500KB gzipped). Flipping back and forwards between pages feels sluggish in Firefox. My initial hypothesis is that letting the client's side router tear down the DOM for the current route and build up the DOM for the new route might be slower than just relying on the browser's back/forwards cache as a set of boring static pages would do.

    1. Hardly a scientific survey, but the answers on Twitter and offline have been surprisingly consistent: server-side React for graceful degradation, jQuery and possibly shared templates (e.g. Mustache) for progressive enhancement
  3. Apr 2016
    1. Good article on progressive enhancement. Jake Archibald now works for Google, I'm not sure if that was the case at the time.

  4. Jan 2015