25 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. It's much easier to iterate on new versions by deploying npm packages than updates to the compiler toolchain. Therefore, it might be best if the actual implementation still lives in the react package.
    1. Poor iterative development involves flailing around randomly searching for a solution-and mistaking this oscillation for iteration.
    2. One of the inherent dangers of any form of iterative development is confusing iteration with oscillation.
  2. Sep 2020
  3. Jul 2020
    1. Transparency is an additional safeguard whenthe circumstances of the research do not allow for aspecific consent. A lack of purpose specification may be offset by information on the development ofthe purpose being provided regularly by controllers as the research project progresses so that, overtime, the consent will be as specific as possible. When doing so, the data subject has at least a basicunderstanding of the state of play, allowing him/her to assess whether or not to use, for example, theright to withdraw consent
  4. May 2020
    1. TypeScript’s type inference means that you don’t have to annotate your code until you want more safety.
    2. Adopting TypeScript is not a binary choice, you can start by annotating existing JavaScript with JSDoc, then switch a few files to be checked by TypeScript and over time prepare your codebase to convert completely.
    1. GitLab's Iteration value means we often make small improvements to the product. We use this to get feedback on what features are important to people. It is not a bug when GitLab is missing functionality.
    1. I think we have it to encourage our iteration 👣 value, and to create small MRs
    2. When you are building incremental changes, you simply follow-up from the last commit's behavior and improve it — IMO if you can state what are the improvements in the subject that should be just fine.
    3. These two are in my opinion the most problematic — the basically go against each other. Typically, I try to work in increments over a feature and commit when I reach whatever techinical milestone I want to "checkpoint" at. It can also be out of the need to expose some idea or architecture and push it.
    1. By embracing the autonomy that comes with a role at GitLab, you're able to ship more, and do so more quickly. Success is tied to one's ability to ship quickly, iterate slowly, rely on themselves as a fact-finding resource, and to not lean on someone else to do something you're capable of accomplishing.
  5. Apr 2020
    1. But also just store the entire payload in a JSON field. This probably won’t scale throughout the life of an app, but I don’t see the harm in it while you’re feeling things out.
    1. Each commit is composed so you can read them from start to finish and see what was done to get to the next iteration of the application.
    1. This cycle is repeated until everyone involved is satisfied that the Scenarios accurately describe what is wanted in a testable manner.
  6. Mar 2020
    1. A given piece of material may require six or more drafts over a period of several years, and some drafts are never developed into completed work.
  7. Feb 2020
    1. We do the smallest thing possible and get it out as quickly as possible.
    2. Iteration can be uncomfortable, even painful. If you're doing iteration correctly, it should be.
    3. People that join GitLab all say they already practice this iteration. But this is the value that they have the hardest time adopting. People are trained that if you don't deliver a perfect or polished thing you get dinged for it. If you do just one piece of something you have to come back to it. Doing the whole thing seems more efficient, even though it isn't.