53 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
    1. https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2022/06/spring-83/

      I've been thinking about this sort of thing off and on myself.

      I too almost immediately thought of Fraidyc.at and its nudge at shifting the importance of content based on time and recency. I'd love to have a social reader with additional affordances for both this time shifting and Ton's idea of reading based on social distance.

      I'm struck by the seemingly related idea of @peterhagen's LindyLearn platform and annotations: https://annotations.lindylearn.io/new/ which focuses on taking some of the longer term interesting ideas as the basis for browsing and chewing on. Though even here, one needs some of the odd, the cutting edge, and the avant garde in their balanced internet diet. Would Spring '83 provide some of this?

      I'm also struck by some similarities this has with the idea of Derek Siver's /now page movement. I see some updating regularly while others have let it slip by the wayside. Still the "board" of users exists, though one must click through a sea of mostly smiling and welcoming faces to get to it the individual pieces of content. (The smiling faces are more inviting and personal than the cacophony of yelling and chaos I see in models for Spring '83.) This reminds me of Stanley Meyers' frequent assertion that he attempted to design a certain "sense of quiet" into the early television show Dragnet to balance the seeming loudness of the everyday as well as the noise of other contemporaneous television programming.

      The form reminds me a bit of the signature pages of one's high school year book. But here, instead of the goal being timeless scribbles, one has the opportunity to change the message over time. Does the potential commercialization of the form (you know it will happen in a VC world crazed with surveillance capitalism) follow the same trajectory of the old college paper facebook? Next up, Yearbook.com!

      Beyond the thing as a standard, I wondered what the actual form of Spring '83 adds to a broader conversation? What does it add to the diversity of voices that we don't already see in other spaces. How might it be abused? Would people come back to it regularly? What might be its emergent properties?

      It definitely seems quirky and fun in and old school web sort of way, but it also stresses me out looking at the zany busyness of some of the examples of magazine stands. The general form reminds me of the bargain bins at book stores which have the promise of finding valuable hidden gems and at an excellent price, but often the ideas and quality of what I find usually isn't worth the discounted price and the return on investment is rarely worth the effort. How might this get beyond these forms?

      It also brings up the idea of what other online forms we may have had with this same sort of raw experimentation? How might the internet have looked if there had been a bigger rise of the wiki before that of the blog? What would the world be like if Webmention had existed before social media rose to prominence? Did we somehow miss some interesting digital animals because the web rose so quickly to prominence without more early experimentation before its "Cambrian explosion"?

      I've been thinking about distilled note taking forms recently and what a network of atomic ideas on index cards look like and what emerges from them. What if the standard were digital index cards that linked and cross linked to each other, particularly in a world without adherence to time based orders and streams? What does a new story look like if I can pull out a card either at random or based on a single topic and only see it or perhaps some short linked chain of ideas (mine or others) which come along with it? Does the choice of a random "Markov monkey" change my thinking or perspective? What comes out of this jar of Pandora? Is it just a new form of cadavre exquis?

      This standard has been out for a bit and presumably folks are experimenting with it. What do the early results look like? How are they using it? Do they like it? Does it need more scale? What do small changes make to the overall form?


      For more on these related ideas, see: https://hypothes.is/search?q=tag%3A%22spring+%2783%22

  2. Jun 2022
    1. Is it just me or is there something quirky with the rel="canonical" links for docdrop so that there isn't URL parity for the annotations on docdrop and the equivalent youtube videos. I thought it used to work, but when I visit the youtube version, there are no annotations on the page. I thought this used to work the way one would expect. What changed?

      I'm noticing that in this particular case there are two rel-canonical links when one might expect only one:

      <link rel="canonical" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgMh6iuFbT4"><br /> <link rel="canonical" href="http://docdrop.org/video/XgMh6iuFbT4/">

      Maybe the docdrop link should be a rel="alternate" instead?

      cc: @dwhly

    1. https://briansunter.com/graph/#/page/logseq-social

      Brian Sunter (twitter) using Logseq as a social network platform.

      What simple standards exist here? Could this more broadly and potentially be used to connect personal wikis, digital gardens, zettelkasten, etc?

      Note that in this thread Dave Winer asks about how it can be tied into other standardized pieces to interconnect?

      How can I hook my outlines into your net if I’m not running Logseq?

      — dave.rss (@davewiner) June 13, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
  3. May 2022
    1. Text file You can provide a simple text file that contains one URL per line. The text file must follow these guidelines: The text file must have one URL per line. The URLs cannot contain embedded new lines. You must fully specify URLs, including the http. Each text file can contain a maximum of 50,000 URLs and must be no larger than 50MB (52,428,800 bytes). If you site includes more than 50,000 URLs, you can separate the list into multiple text files and add each one separately. The text file must use UTF-8 encoding. You can specify this when you save the file (for instance, in Notepad, this is listed in the Encoding menu of the Save As dialog box). The text file should contain no information other than the list of URLs. The text file should contain no header or footer information. If you would like, you may compress your Sitemap text file using gzip to reduce your bandwidth requirement. You can name the text file anything you wish. Please check to make sure that your URLs follow the RFC-3986 standard for URIs, the RFC-3987 standard for IRIs You should upload the text file to the highest-level directory you want search engines to crawl and make sure that you don't list URLs in the text file that are located in a higher-level directory. Sample text file entries are shown below. http://www.example.com/catalog?item=1 http://www.example.com/catalog?item=11

      There's been a plaintext sitemap standard this whole time??? Lmao I'm an idiot.

  4. Dec 2021
  5. Sep 2021
  6. Aug 2021
    1. I'm wondering exactly what problem that LOUD standard is meant to be solving exactly? It doesn't appear that any of the meta data they're listing is over and above anything that's already extant?

      If you're going to propose a new set up, why not add some bits to fix the newer problems that have popped up like for paying creators? Being able to inject ads? Better track the number of listens? How far into the file did the listener get? How many ads did they hear?

      And let's not forget:

  7. Jun 2021
  8. stoa.anagora.org stoa.anagora.org
    1. Some conventions may be emerging in a new batch of personal knowledge management tools, or amenable to them; for the duration of this document, we'll refer to these tools as [[personal knowledge management]] tools, [[roam like]] or (preferred as of the time of writing) [[wiki like]].

      It would be incredibly useful to have a list of these [[Roam Research like]] tools so that they can be documented as to what level of input they can/could take and remain compatible from text, to text+[[wiki links]], to the various flavors of markdown up to full HTML perhaps.

      I know a handful are documented at indieweb.org/commonplace_book

  9. May 2021
    1. Whether or not digital gardens should follow any standards is an interesting question.

      What features/functionality should a digital garden have? Is there a canonical list yet?

      I wish more supported Webmention to enable the Memex dream...

    1. why do we have an <img> element? Why not an <icon> element? Or an <include> element? Why not a hyperlink with an include attribute, or some combination of rel values? Why an <img> element? Quite simply, because Marc Andreessen shipped one, and shipping code wins.That’s not to say that all shipping code wins; after all, Andrew and Intermedia and HyTime shipped code too. Code is necessary but not sufficient for success. And I certainly don’t mean to say that shipping code before a standard will produce the best solution.

      Shipping code is necessary, but not sufficient for success.

  10. Apr 2021
  11. Mar 2021
    1. In terms of defining the “open” in open web annotation, I tend to take a standards approach: the Hypothes.is tool is built upon, and our organization advocates for, open standards in web annotation.

      This explanation also highlights an additional idea of open itself. I have heard many in the W3C space criticize the open standard of web annotation arrived at because of the ultimate monoculture of the space. Most of the participants of the process were all related to Hypothes.is in some way and the result was a single product that implemented the standard. To my knowledge no other companies, groups, or individual programmers have separately implemented the standard.

      In this sense, while the "standard" is openly defined, it isn't as open as other standards which were mote slowly evolved and implemented gradually and more broadly by various programming languages and disparate groups.

  12. Feb 2021
  13. Nov 2020
    1. Capacitor's origins lie in Ionic's mission to provide a holistic framework for developing hybrid apps—apps that run on mobile devices, on desktops, and in the browser. It does not only replace Apache Cordova as a “bridge” to native platform access in new Ionic projects but also “provides a consistent, web-focused set of APIs”.
  14. Sep 2020
  15. Jul 2020
    1. A growing number of platforms, vendors, and partners support the AMP Project by providing custom components or offering integration with AMP pages within their platforms.

      I guess AMP is actually open-source software, but it still feels like it's something non-standard. I guess it's just an alternative open standard to the "main" web open standards.

  16. May 2020
  17. Apr 2020
    1. And if the closed platforms prohibited DRM in apps, then the large content providers would simply distribute their own set-top boxes and game consoles as the only way to watch their stuff.

      This sounds a bit naive to me. Who would buy those set-top boxes and game consoles? And do not only consider the United States' and European markets. Wouldn't the large content providers have to adapt to how the web works if they want to reach a broader audience?

    2. embed Netflix content in their own web pages,

      Now that the w3c has recommended eme, Is this possible?

    1. Extensions are built using web technology and can use the same APIs the browser provides to the open web.

      Wonder what they mean by "open web". Web standards, presumably.

  18. Feb 2020
  19. Dec 2019
    1. And other recent developments suggest that doing so could overcome many of the earlier pitfalls of protocol-based systems, potentially creating the best of all words: useful internet services, with competition driving innovation, not controlled solely by giant corporations, but financially sustainable, providing end users with more control over their own data and privacy—and providing mis- and disinformation far fewer opportunities to wreak havoc.

      Some of the issue with this then becomes: "Who exactly creates these standards?" We already have issues with mega-corporations like Google wielding out sized influence in the ability to create new standards like Schema.org or AMP.

      Who is to say they don't tacitly design their standards to directly (and only) benefit themselves?

  20. Nov 2019
  21. Sep 2019
  22. Aug 2019
  23. Mar 2019
  24. webstandards.hhs.gov webstandards.hhs.gov
    1. Usability guidelines This site seems a bit dated in its appearance but still provides the user the opportunity to review usability standards in general, together with a rating of the weight of evidence that supports each assertion. It would take some time to go through all the information available on this site. It is also usable enough that a designer can check up on guidelines while in the middle of designing a specific project. Rating 3/5

  25. Mar 2018
    1. We worked with the industry to launch the open-source Accelerated Mobile Pages Project to improve the mobile web

      There was some collaborative outreach, but AMP is really a Google-driven spec without significant outside input.

      See also: http://ampletter.org/

    2. With AMP Stories, which is now in beta, publishers can combine the speed of AMP with the rich, immersive storytelling of the open web.

      "With AMP Stories, which is now in beta, publishers can combine the speed of AMP with the rich, immersive storytelling of the open web."

      Is this sentence's structure explicitly saying that AMP is not "open web"?!

  26. Apr 2017
    1. Google is adding a Fact Check feature to Google Search and Google News. When fact checks are available from one or more approved publishers, they will appear in the search results.

      One requirement for publishers to be cited is to use the schema.org ClaimReview markup, or the Share the Facts widget.

    1. Dave Winer points out that interoperability of software is important. Don't shun an existing standard just because you think your way is better. If you hate using some standard technology, find or write a module to convert between the standard and your preferred format.

  27. Mar 2017
    1. All views use standards-based HTML templates

      Aurelia's standards focus means our code stays relevant down the road.

    2. One of the strengths of Aurelia is that you can write so much of your application in vanilla JS.

      By sticking close to standards, such as upcoming EcmaScript features, Aurelia code prepares for us for the future. It encourages writing code that will be relevant 2-5 years from now, or perhaps beyond.

  28. Oct 2016
  29. Sep 2016
    1. I’ve found Canvas to be less draconian than I’d been led to expect. More broadly, the LMS ecosystem that’s emerged — based on a standard called Learning Tools Interoperability (LTI), now supported by all the LMS systems — led me to an insight about how the same approach could help unify the emerging ecosystem of annotation systems. Even more broadly, all this has prompted me to reflect on how the modern web platform is both more standardized and more balkanized than ever before.

      ...

      The app I’ve written is a thin layer of glue between two components: Canvas and Hypothes.is. LTI defines how they interact, and I’d be lying if I said it was easy to figure out to get our app to launch inside Canvas and respond back to it. But I didn’t need to be an HTTP, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, or Python wizard to get the job done.

  30. Jan 2016
    1. The prohibition on reporting bugs in systems with DRM makes those bugs last longer, and get exploited harder before they're patched. Last summer, the US Copyright Office collected evidence about DRM interfering with reporting bugs in tractors, cars, medical implants, and critical national infrastructure.
    2. DRM exists to stop users from doing things they want to do and to stop innovative companies from helping users do things they want to do -- or would want to do, if they had the option. Your cable box, for example, will be designed to stop you from recording your favorite shows for long-term storage and viewing on the go.
    3. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the nonprofit body that maintains the Web's core standards, made a terrible mistake in 2013: they decided to add DRM
  31. Dec 2015
  32. Nov 2015
  33. Jan 2014
    1. The process of tying two items together is the important thing.

      Annotations are at the Web’s core.