11 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. Edward Thorndike's three laws of learning. The page does not explain this, but his theories came out in about 1900. His three laws of learning appear to be relevant to our course work. This simple page features black text on a white page. It is brief and it simply describes the three laws of learning. rating 5/5

  2. Feb 2019
    1. For example, the idea of “data ownership” is often championed as a solution. But what is the point of owning data that should not exist in the first place? All that does is further institutionalise and legitimate data capture. It’s like negotiating how many hours a day a seven-year-old should be allowed to work, rather than contesting the fundamental legitimacy of child labour. Data ownership also fails to reckon with the realities of behavioural surplus. Surveillance capitalists extract predictive value from the exclamation points in your post, not merely the content of what you write, or from how you walk and not merely where you walk. Users might get “ownership” of the data that they give to surveillance capitalists in the first place, but they will not get ownership of the surplus or the predictions gleaned from it – not without new legal concepts built on an understanding of these operations.
    1. Would you rather trust a human legal system or the details of some computer code you don't have the expertise to audit?

      A corollary question might be, if the legal system and code of laws have gotten so highly specialized that they require specialists to navigate them, are you trusting a "human" system or a technology? (With the answer including the fact that humans being involved at all is different from a machine-implemented algorithm, even if human decisions are constrained by the legal "algorithms.")

  3. Jan 2019
    1. Should a man wish to adorn himself with the ornaments of the earth, to wear its apparels, or partake of the benefits it can bestow, no harm can befall him, if he alloweth nothing whatever to intervene between him and God, for God hath ordained every good thing, whether created in the heavens or in the earth, for such of His servants as truly believe in Him.

      Definition of attachment.

      Also, if your actions are due to addiction but you're consciously trying to counter it (or even, if you don't have help in quitting, just disliking it), perhaps that's different from allowing something to "intervene between him and God".

    2. Say: Should your conduct, O people, contradict your professions, how think ye, then, to be able to distinguish yourselves from them who, though professing their faith in the Lord their God, have, as soon as He came unto them in the cloud of holiness, refused to acknowledge Him, and repudiated His truth?

      What's the difference between a professed Baha'i who (purposefully?) breaks the laws, and people who do not accept the next Manifestation when They come?

      How does this fit with, for example, alcohol addiction? Is that conduct that is contradicting someone's professions? Maybe not if your professions are "alcohol is bad, we shouldn't do it, but I am addicted and trying to recover", as opposed to "Baha'u'llah says alcohol is bad, but I drink anyway and don't see it as a problem".

  4. Aug 2018
    1. Legislative staff members had finished rewriting AB 375, and a deal seemed imminent. That Friday, as he drank his morning coffee, Mactaggart decided to read the new bill — the fine print — one more time. He noticed a seemingly minor alteration in one section, the kind of thing most people would skip over. Mactaggart realized it would completely gut what remained of the private right of action. Furious, he called Hertzberg and Chau and told them the deal was off. Neither lawmaker could explain who made the change, Mactaggart told me, but Hertzberg scrambled to fix it. “In most negotiations, you are talking to all these different interest groups,” Hertzberg told me recently. “This is a situation where we had to go and reach out to everyone and bring that information to Mr. Mactaggart and ask him what he wanted to do.”

      Here's a case where we ought to consider creating our bills and laws via version control, so we can see exactly who, what, and when things changed along the way. It might mean much less gets done, but there'd be a lot more transparency and accountability.

  5. Feb 2017
    1. For a boss to fire a worker is at most a minor inconvenience; for a worker to lose a job is a disaster. The Holmes-Rahe Stress Scale, a measure of the comparative stress level of different life events, puts being fired at 47 units, worse than the death of a close friend and nearly as bad as a jail term. Tellingly, “firing one of your employees” failed to make the scale.

      Because of State labor laws, stupid. They make it hard to change jobs, hard to fire workers and hence hard to hire workers. In a libertarian world this would in principle be much smoother.

    2. Once the employee is hired, the boss may ask on a moment’s notice that she work a half hour longer or else she’s fired, and she may not dare to even complain. On the other hand, if she were to so much as ask to be allowed to start work thirty minutes later to get more sleep or else she’ll quit, she might well be laughed out of the company. A boss may, and very often does, yell at an employee who has made a minor mistake, telling her how stupid and worthless she is, but rarely could an employee get away with even politely mentioning the mistake of a boss, even if it is many times as unforgivable.

      Here and after the author treats as a libertarian problem what happens today under the rule of the State labor laws.

      In a world without State labor laws, contracts would apply. Contracts could evolve and have all these situations expected in their clauses. Also, this seems to me to be a case for actually working law (which the criticism imagines as unexisting in a libertarian society): https://hypothes.is/a/PBirDvnYEeaWvjeIs4H9kg.

  6. Aug 2016
    1. But those crying the loudest to stop the lock-out laws fail to provide an adequate alternative.

      Response piece "No Surprise The Young Don't Support Lock-Out Laws" (31 Aug 2016) at Stony Roads mentions this statement.

      There are some terrible personal opinions in this article that really push a tired and very under constructive rhetoric.

      'Those crying the loudest to stop the lock-out laws fail to provide an adequate alternative'.

      This quote alone shows a lack of research into Matt Barrie's 70 page submission, any consideration into the views of the people who went to the effort of writing 1 of the 1,856 submissions to State parliament, or simply the lack of effort to type in google, 'alternative solutions to lockout laws'.

      The reference to "Matt Barrie's 70 page submission" can be supposed as that included in the article posted by Matt Barrie on LinkedIn, "The death of Sydney's nightlife and collapse of its night time economy" (03 April 2016), submission titled "A Detailed Submission to the Callinan Inquiry on Liquor Laws". That submission/article is mainly about the circumstances under which the lock-out laws were proposed and enacted, as well as the results of those laws so far (with considerable detail on political and statistical manipulations and misrepresentations), and not so much about providing alternatives, however it does suggest that the lock-out laws themselves are far from an adequate solution.

      Note that Matt Barrie's submission was covered fairly well by the SMH in their own article, "Sydney lockout laws a dismal failure, Matt Barrie writes in 70-page submission" (04 April 2016). The article by Jennifer Duke this annotation is for is, by stark contrast, little more than anecdotal or purely "personal opinion".

      The group named Keep Sydney Open is probably representative of "those crying the loudest", having organised public rallies attended by many thousands of people (estimates of 10,000 to 15,000). The Huffington Post interviewed spokesperson, Tyson Koh, for the article "Sydney Lockout Laws Have Had A 'Massive Effect' On Community, Jobs" (13 Feb 2016):

      Koh pointed to a number of alternate strategies used in places like New York, Vancouver and Amsterdam to combat late-night violence.

      Twenty four-hour public transport, more visible policing in nightlife precincts, staggered venue closing times and introducing later dining and retail hours all had merit, he said.

      "There's a lot of things that are available to us that will improve safety and enable people to go out to all hours."

  7. Oct 2013
    1. Equity must be applied to forgivable actions; and it must make us distinguish between criminal acts on the one hand, and errors of judgement, or misfortunes, on the other. (A "misfortune" is an act, not due to moral badness, that has unexpected results: an "error of judgement" is an act, also not due to moral badness, that has results that might have been expected: a "criminal act" has results that might have been expected, but is due to moral badness, for that is the source of all actions inspired by our appetites.) Equity bids us be merciful to the weakness of human nature; to think less about the laws than about the man who framed them, and less about what he said than about what he meant; not to consider the actions of the accused so much as his intentions, nor this or that detail so much as the whole story; to ask not what a man is now but what he has always or usually been.

      human nature, laws

  8. Sep 2013
    1. He must, therefore, know how many different forms of constitution there are; under what conditions each of these will prosper and by what internal developments or external attacks each of them tends to be destroyed. When I speak of destruction through internal developments I refer to the fact that all constitutions, except the best one of all, are destroyed both by not being pushed far enough and by being pushed too far.