236 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2024
    1. 60% of WP hacks is based on stolen session cookies. Another third on core/plugin/theme vulnerabilities. Forcing log-outs for admin accounts then is a fix.

  2. Mar 2024
    1. Changing the login URL is a feature we do not include in Wordfence. Though it is something that many people swear by and can help a little in certain situations it’s ultimately not very beneficial. These are the reasons why:

      Brief explanation why not to change Wordpress login URL

  3. Nov 2023
  4. Oct 2023
  5. Sep 2023
  6. Aug 2023
  7. Jun 2023
    1. https://web.archive.org/web/20230617185715/https://diggingthedigital.com/het-dilemma-van-de-digitale-diversiteit/

      Frank on having a different experience for your site than just a blog timeline.

      Ik herken wat je ze zegt. Ik zou het prettig vinden om meerdere soorten ingangen, tijdslijn, op thema of onderwerp, type content, setjes die onderling linken, etc. te kunnen bieden als een soort spectrum. Met name als voorpagina om niet alleen een blogtijdslijn te bieden aan een toevallige lezer of aan de explorerende lezer. Drie jaar geleden ben ik eens begonnen met een WordPress theme daarvoor. Maar ja, ik kan eigenlijk helemaal geen themes maken. Misschien dat het met Jan Boddez' IndieBlocks nu makkelijker zou gaan, want dan hoef ik in een nieuw theme niet ook nog eens al die IndieWeb dingen te regelen. Maar eens de project notities uit 2020 (toen, want toch thuis) afstoffen voor komend najaar. De zomer wordt dat niks, die is voor lezen.

      Zoals ik https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2020/11/15326/ schreef: The idea is to find a form factor that does not clearly say ‘this is a blog’ or ‘this is a wiki’, but presents a slightly confusing mix of stock and flow / garden and stream, something that shows the trees and the forest at the same time. So as to invite visitors to explore with a sense of wonder, rather than read the latest or read hierarchically. At the back-end nothing will fundamentally change, there still will be blogposts and pages with their current URLs, and the same-as-now feeds for them to subscribe to.

  8. May 2023
    1. Another downside to using Gutenberg’s sidebar panels is that, as long as I want to keep supporting the classic editor, I’ve basically got to maintain two copies of the same code, one in PHP and another in JavaScript.

      Note to self: getting into WP Gutenberg is a shift deeper into JS and less PHP. My usually entry into creating something for myself is to base it on *AMP (MAMP now) so I can re-use what I have in PHP and MySQL as a homecook.

  9. Apr 2023
    1. Link: https://wordpress.org/plugins/hypothesis/

      Note that on the page is warning:

      This plugin has been closed as of January 28, 2022 and is not available for download. Reason: Guideline Violation.

  10. Mar 2023
  11. Jan 2023
    1. Just added RSS links to many of my categories. They’ve always existed, I just figured it would be nice to include them in the category description.

      This is a very good idea. All WordPress sites output feeds for categories and tags by default. I will borrow this for categories and tags for which I regularly produce enough articles for them to merit individual subscriptions for interested readers.

  12. Dec 2022
    1. I'm finding that IndieBlocks may be the way to go since most of the indieweb plugins that are out there are lacking block editor compatibility and most of them state you need classic editor enabled which isn't helpful if you are trying to move forward with the way in which WordPress is going with the block editor. Maybe some of these devs haven't "learn javascript deeply" like Matt Mullenweg suggested and are still stuck in PHP land like many of the people like me are, sadly.

      Anecdotal evidence of long time WordPress fans who are being left behind in the move to Gutenberg and more JavaScript.

    1. https://schopie1.commons.msu.edu/2022/12/05/microblogging_with_mastodon/

      OMG! There is so much to love here about these processes and to see people in the wild experimenting with them and figuring them out.

      Scott, you are not alone! There are lots of us out here doing these things, not only with WordPress but a huge variety of other platforms. There are many ways to syndicate your content depending on where it starts its life.

      In addition to Jim Groom and a huge group of others' work on A Domain of One's Own, there's also a broader coalition of designers, developers, professionals, hobbyists, and people of all strips working on these problems under the name of IndieWeb.

      For some of their specific work you might appreciate the following:<br /> - https://indieweb.org/Indieweb_for_Education - https://indieweb.org/A_Domain_of_One%27s_Own - https://indieweb.org/academic_samizdat - https://indieweb.org/WordPress - https://indieweb.org/Category:syndication

      Incidentally, I wrote this for our friend Kathleen Fitzpatrick last week and I can't wait to see what she's come up with over the weekend and the coming weeks. Within the IndieWeb community you'll find people like Ben Werdmuller who created large portions of both WithKnown and Elgg and Aram Zucker-Scharff who helped to create PressForward.

      I'm thrilled to see the work and huge strides that Humanities Commons is making some of these practices come to fruition.

      If you're game, perhaps we ought to plan an upcoming education-related popup event as an IndieWebCamp event to invite more people into this broader conversation?

      If you have questions or need any help in these areas, I'm around, but so are hundreds of friends in the IndieWeb chat: https://chat.indieweb.org.

      I hope we can bring more of these technologies to the masses in better and easier-to-use manners to lower the technical hurdles.

  13. Nov 2022
    1. Donations

      To add some other intermediary services:

      To add a service for groups:

      To add a service that enables fans to support the creators directly and anonymously via microdonations or small donations by pre-charging their Coil account to spend on content streaming or tipping the creators' wallets via a layer containing JS script following the Interledger Protocol proposed to W3C:

      If you want to know more, head to Web Monetization or Community or Explainer

      Disclaimer: I am a recipient of a grant from the Interledger Foundation, so there would be a Conflict of Interest if I edited directly. Plus, sharing on Hypothesis allows other users to chime in.

  14. Oct 2022
    1. Yes! My IndieBlocks plugin is now up on WP.org. Current version offers a single “Context” block, and, optionally, (1) some custom post types, and (2) the ability to add microformats2 to block-based (!) themes.

      Very interesting project to add IndieWeb blocks to WordPress's Gutenberg editor. I will be following it, although I am not keen on its adding custom post types - something I prefer to do with my own plugins.

    1. Current IndieWeb set-ups do not support the Gutenberg editor in WordPress as blocks are not supported. Jan’s plugin is created for blocks. Will need to try this out (also because my recent presentation at WordCamp on making WP IndieWeb compatible by default played a small role). Nice timing Jan, releasing it just so it can dominate my weekend

      An IndieWeb plugin for implementing IndieWeb functionality in WordPress blocks. I have added some IndieWeb functionality to my site, although it does not support it by default. I am curious how it would work on my theme - but I will wait until information about its effect on page speed and its options/database tables (if applicable) are available. Also not keen on its adding two custom post types - I prefer to not tie that to a plugin I may have to uninstall.

  15. Aug 2022
    1. FeedWordPress is an open-source Atom/RSS aggregator for the WordPress blog publishing platform. You set up feeds that you choose, and FeedWordPress syndicates posts from those sources into your WordPress posts table, where they can be displayed by your WordPress templates like any other post — but with additional meta-data, so that your templates can properly attribute the post to the source it came from. FeedWordPress was originally developed because I needed a more flexible replacement for Planet to use at some aggregator sites that I administered. You can use FeedWordPress to create aggregator sites that bring together posts from many different sources, using the WordPress templating engine to display posts from all around the web. Or you can use it to bring together activity from your blogs, social networks and other online services, into a Lifestream with all your online activity in one place. FeedWordPress is designed with flexibility, ease of use, and ease of configuration in mind. You’ll need a working installation of WordPress (version 4.5 or later), and the ability to add plugins to your WordPress environment, either using WordPress’s Add Plugin feature or SFTP/FTP uploads. The ability to create cron jobs on your web host is helpful but not required.

      An alternative to other forms of RSS and Atom aggregation to a WordPress site.

    1. I've been using WP as visible part of my zettel, which I keep in Obsidian. The only inconvenience is that I don't know how to make visible backlinks on pages that has links to and from.You can look how it works for yourself. Half of my WP is in Russian the section with books is fully in English. Browse there to see how it all works. Post your thoughts what you think about it.

      I know that a few people have been using the Webmention and the Semantic Linkbacks plugins for WordPress together to show the backlinks in the "comments" section of their posts/pages. Perhaps this may work for your purposes?

      A recent example I've seen someone put together on WordPress that does something similar (though not using Slippy) is https://cyberzettel.com/.

      In a similar vein, though not with WordPress, Kevin Marks mocked up a UI for an incoming/outgoing links in the mode of a Memex that also leverages Webmentions for part of the functionality: https://www.kevinmarks.com/memex.html.

  16. Jul 2022
    1. In the functions.php of your WordPress theme add:

      Same solution but in PHP

      php function hints() { header("link: </wp-content/themes/phpied2/style.css>; rel=preload, </wp-includes/css/dist/block-library/style.min.css?ver=5.4.1>; rel=preload"); } add_action('send_headers', 'hints');

    2. We can. I cannot because the shared Dreamhost hosting doesn't let me edit Apache config beyond .htaccess. But if you have access to the server or virtual host config, see here. Basically all you need to do in addition to what we did in .htaccess is to add: H2EarlyHints on

      Even better solution with:

      H2EarlyHints on

    3. What I describe here is a one-off thing for demonstration. As you can probably guess by the "5.4.1", when you upgrade WordPress or change themes, you might need to change the URLs of the preloaded CSS in the .htaccess.

      Currently there may be no plugin to do it automatically

    4. And immediately after it, the 2 CSS downloads begin. What we want to do is move the CSS downloads to the left, so all rendering starts (and finishes!) sooner. So all you do it take the URLs of these two files and add them to .htaccess with H2PushResource in front. For me that means the URL to my custom theme's CSS /wp-content/themes/phpied2/style.css as well as some WordPress CSS stuff. While I was there I also added a JavaScript file which is loaded later. Why now start early? So the end result is:

      WordPress tip to start loading some CSS and JS files earlier.

      Sample code to add to .htaccess: H2PushResource /wp-content/themes/phpied2/style.css H2PushResource /wp-includes/css/dist/block-library/style.min.css?ver=5.4.1 H2PushResource /wp-includes/js/wp-emoji-release.min.js?ver=5.4.1

    1. reply to: https://ariadne.space/2022/07/01/a-silo-can-never-provide-digital-autonomy-to-its-users/

      Matt Ridley indicates in The Rational Optimist that markets for goods and services "work so well that it is hard to design them so they fail to deliver efficiency and innovation" while assets markets are nearly doomed to failure and require close and careful regulation.

      If we view the social media landscape from this perspective, an IndieWeb world in which people are purchasing services like easy import/export of their data; the ability to move their domain name and URL permalinks from one web host to another; and CMS (content management system) services/platforms/functionalities, represents the successful market mode for our personal data and online identities. Here competition for these sorts of services will not only improve the landscape, but generally increased competition will tend to drive the costs to consumers down. The internet landscape is developed and sophisticated enough and broadly based on shared standards that this mode of service market should easily be able to not only thrive, but innovate.

      At the other end of the spectrum, if our data are viewed as assets in an asset market between Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, et al., it is easy to see that the market has already failed so miserably that one cannot even easily move ones' assets from one silo to another. Social media services don't compete to export or import data because the goal is to trap you and your data and attention there, otherwise they lose. The market corporate social media is really operating in is one for eyeballs and attention to sell advertising, so one will notice a very health, thriving, and innovating market for advertisers. Social media users will easily notice that there is absolutely no regulation in the service portion of the space at all. This only allows the system to continue failing to provide improved or even innovative service to people on their "service". The only real competition in the corporate silo social media space is for eyeballs and participation because the people and their attention are the real product.

      As a result, new players whose goal is to improve the health of the social media space, like the recent entrant Cohost, are far better off creating a standards based service that allows users to register their own domain names and provide a content management service that has easy import and export of their data. This will play into the services market mode which improves outcomes for people. Aligning in any other competition mode that silos off these functions will force them into competition with the existing corporate social services and we already know where those roads lead.

      Those looking for ethical and healthy models of this sort of social media service might look at Manton Reece's micro.blog platform which provides a wide variety of these sorts of data services including data export and taking your domain name with you. If you're unhappy with his service, then it's relatively easy to export your data and move it to another host using WordPress or some other CMS. On the flip side, if you're unhappy with your host and CMS, then it's also easy to move over to micro.blog and continue along just as you had before. Best of all, micro.blog is offering lots of the newest and most innovative web standards including webmention notificatons which enable website-to-website conversations, micropub, and even portions of microsub not to mention some great customer service.

      I like to analogize the internet and social media to competition in the telecom/cellular phone space In America, you have a phone number (domain name) and can then have your choice of service provider (hosting), and a choice of telephone (CMS). Somehow instead of adopting a social media common carrier model, we have trapped ourselves inside of a model that doesn't provide the users any sort of real service or options. It's easy to imagine what it would be like to need your own AT&T account to talk to family on AT&T and a separate T-Mobile account to talk to your friends on T-Mobile because that's exactly what you're doing with social media despite the fact that you're all still using the same internet. Part of the draw was that services like Facebook appeared to be "free" and it's only years later that we're seeing the all too real costs emerge.

      This sort of competition and service provision also goes down to subsidiary layers of the ecosystem. Take for example the idea of writing interface and text editing. There are (paid) services like iA Writer, Ulysses, and Typora which people use to compose their writing. Many people use these specifically for writing blog posts. Companies can charge for these products because of their beauty, simplicity, and excellent user interfaces. Some of them either do or could support the micropub and IndieAuth web standards which allow their users the ability to log into their websites and directly post their saved content from the editor directly to their website. Sure there are also a dozen or so other free micropub clients that also allow this, but why not have and allow competition for beauty and ease of use? Let's say you like WordPress enough, but aren't a fan of the Gutenberg editor. Should you need to change to Drupal or some unfamiliar static site generator to exchange a better composing experience for a dramatically different and unfamiliar back end experience? No, you could simply change your editor client and continue on without missing a beat. Of course the opposite also applies—WordPress could split out Gutenberg as a standalone (possibly paid) micropub client and users could then easily use it to post to Drupal, micro.blog, or other CMSs that support the micropub spec, and many already do.

      Social media should be a service to and for people all the way down to its core. The more companies there are that provide these sorts of services means more competition which will also tend to lure people away from silos where they're trapped for lack of options. Further, if your friends are on services that interoperate and can cross communicate with standards like Webmention from site to site, you no longer need to be on Facebook because "that's where your friends and family all are."

      I have no doubt that we can all get to a healthier place online, but it's going to take companies and startups like Cohost to make better choices in how they frame their business models. Co-ops and non-profits can help here too. I can easily see a co-op adding webmention to their Mastodon site to allow users to see and moderate their own interactions instead of forcing local or global timelines on their constituencies. Perhaps Garon didn't think Webmention was a fit for Mastodon, but this doesn't mean that others couldn't support it. I personally think that Darius Kazemi's Hometown fork of Mastodon which allows "local only" posting a fabulous little innovation while still allowing interaction with a wider readership, including me who reads him in a microsub enabled social reader. Perhaps someone forks Mastodon to use as a social feed reader, but builds in micropub so that instead of posting the reply to a Mastodon account, it's posted to one's IndieWeb capable website which sends a webmention notification to the original post? Opening up competition this way makes lots of new avenues for every day social tools.

      Continuing the same old siloing of our data and online connections is not the way forward. We'll see who stands by their ethics and morals by serving people's interests and not the advertising industry.

  17. Jun 2022
  18. May 2022
    1. The Library Bookshelves plugin allows you to curate virtual bookshelves just like you would a shelf around a theme in your library. Bookshelves are displayed as customizable Slick carousels, using cover art from, and links to, your library catalog. The plugin creates a Bookshelves post type, shortcode, widget, and custom taxonomy.
    1. The plugin convert content of your blog posts and pages to most popular e-book formats for readers – pdf, ePub, mobi and fb2, using php-librasries: mPDF; PHPePub; MOBIClass; bgFB2. Plugin displays a icons form for download converted files before and/or after content on your blog pages. You can create OPDS catalogue on your site with this plugin, if you enable the option. OPDS catalog support the file-types: 'epub', 'fb2', 'pdf', 'mobi', 'zip', 'rtf', 'doc', 'docx', 'htm', 'html', 'txt', 'djvu', 'mp3', 'm4a', 'm4b'.

      Q.: How can users access the OPDS catalogue?

      A.: OPDS catalogue URL http://yoursite.com/feed/opds.

    1. https://wordpress.org/plugins/slippy/

      This WordPress plugin looks like it's a solid custom post type for creating a digital zettelkasten. Looks like it relies on tags/categories for linking, though has a custom link function. This in combination with Webmention could be a useful bi-directional link set up.

    1. https://x28newblog.wordpress.com/2022/05/08/curating-my-blog-archive/

      I like the overall look and effect done here to create a table of contents in WordPress, but it seems like some quirky gymnastics to pull it off. How might this be done in a more straightforward way? Are there any plugins for WordPress that could create a page that keeps the categories and the descriptions? And particularly a page that primarily only shows articles and not other content types?

      Link this to my work on my own index at https://boffosocko.com/about/index/

  19. Apr 2022
    1. https://notiz.blog/2022/04/27/custom-post-type-comment/

    2. I really like the idea, but haven't found a similar suggestion in the Trac yet

      I could swear that there's a suggestion in WordPress Trac for creating a custom post type for comments somewhere.

    1. I suspect that a reasonable WordPress user could probably set up a free Hypothes.is account and use the RSS feed from it (something like https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?user=username) to create an IFTTT.com recipe to post it as a public/draft to their WordPress website.

      This is a note. With an linked video

    2. I created a video overview/walkthrough of how I take highlights and annotations on Hypothes.isHypothes.is and feed them through to my WordPress Website using RSS and IFTTT.com.
    3. What follows may tend toward the jargon-y end of programming, but I’ll endeavor to explain it all and go step-by-step to allow those with little or no programming experience to follow along and use the tools I’m describing in a very powerful way.  I’ll do my best to link the jargon to definitions and examples for those who haven’t run across them before. Hopefully with a bit of explanation, the ability to cut and paste some code, or even make some basic modifications, you’ll be able to do what I and others have done, but without having to puzzle it all out from scratch.

      This is a note.

    1. How do you get your annotations into the rest of your workflow for notes and learning? How do you prevent that your social annotation tool is yet another separate place where one keeps stuff, cutting off the connections to the rest of one’s work and learning that would make it valuable?

      Where

      My annotations broadly flow into two spaces:

      Obsidian

      My private Obsidian-based vault is where I collect the notes and actively work on, modify, edit, and expand them if and when necessary. This is also the space where I'm broadly attempting to densely interlink them together for future use and publication in other venues. If I could, I would publish these all on the web, but I've yet to find a set up with a low enough admin tax that I can publish them inexpensively in a way I'd like them to appear (primarily with properly linked [[WikiLinks]]) while still owning them in my own space.

      I've been experimenting around with using Blot.im as a solution to display them here https://notes.boffosocko.com/, but at present it's a very limited selection of my extant notes and doesn't include Webmention or other niceties I'd like to add. As it's a very alpha stage experiment I don't recommend anyone follow or use it and it may disappear altogether in the coming months.

      WordPress

      My main website uses WordPress. To a great extent, this is (now) primarily a back up location and the majority of the annotations are unpublished to the public, but are searchable to me on the back end.

      I do, however, use it occasionally for quickly publishing and syndicating select annotations which I think others may find interesting or upon which I'm looking for comments/feedback and don't expect that the audience I'd like these from will find them natively on Hypothes.is' platform. An example of this might be a paper I was reading this weekend on Roland Barthes which discusses his reasonably well documented zettelkasten-like note taking practice. The article can be found here: https://culturemachine.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/373-604-1-PB.pdf with the annotations seen here: https://docdrop.org/pdf/The-Card-Index-as-Creativity-Ma---Wilken-Rowan-upq8g.pdf/. To tip off others in the space, I made a post on my site with a bit of a puzzle and syndicated it to Twitter. A few hours later I posted a follow up with some additional details and links to my notes on hypothesis which got some useful feedback from Matthias Melcher on the Barthes paper as well as on a related paper I mentioned by Luhmann, particularly about German translation, with which I have little facility.

      Another recent illustrative example was this annotation on the Library of Congress website about Vladimir Nabokov which was picked up by my website (though unpublished/not public) but which I syndicated to Twitter primarily to be able to send a notification to Eleanor Konik who I know is interested in the idea of World Building using historical facts and uses Obsidian in her work. (The @mention in the tweet is hiding in the image of the index card so that I could save text space in the main tweet.) Several others interested in note taking and zettelkasten for writing also noticed it and "liked" it. Not being on Hypothes.is to my knowledge much less following me there, neither Eleanor nor the others would have seen it without the Tweet.

      Nabokov used index cards for his research & writing. In one index card for Lolita, he creates a "weight-heigh-age table for girls of school age" to be able to specify Lolita's measurements. He also researched the Colt catalog of 1940. #WorldBuildinghttps://t.co/i16Yc7CbJ8 pic.twitter.com/JSjXV50L3M

      — Chris Aldrich (@ChrisAldrich) April 10, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      How

      Obsidian

      Getting annotations from Hypothes.is to Obsidian is a short two-step process which is reasonably well automated so that I don't spend a lot of time cutting/pasting/formatting.

      I start with an IFTTT recipe that takes the RSS output of Hypothes.is and creates text files directly into my Obsidian vault. The results are quite rudimentary and only include the title of the document, the permalink of the Hypothes.is post, the highlighted text, and my annotation. It doesn't include the tags as RSS doesn't have a specification for these.

      Second, I've set up Hypothesidian which has a much higher fidelity dovetail with the Hypothes.is API to get all the data and even the formatting set up I'm looking for. A reasonably well laid out set of instructions with a low/no code approach for it can be found at https://forum.obsidian.md/t/retrieve-annotations-for-hypothes-is-via-templater-plugin-hypothes-idian/17225. It allows importing annotations by a variety of methods including by date and by document URL. I've also made a small modification to it so that tags on Hypothes.is are turned into [[wikilinks]] in Obsidian instead of #tags which I only use sparingly.

      All the IFTTT annotations will be ported individually into a specific Obsidian folder where I'll process them. I can then quickly use Hypothesidian to import the properly laid out version (using templates) of the notes with just a few keystrokes and then focus my time on revising my notes if necessary and then linking them to the appropriate notes already in my system. Finally I'll move them into the appropriate folder based on their content—typically one of the following: zettelkasten, wiki, commonplace, dictionary, or sources (for bibliographic use). Careful watchers will notice that I often use Hypothes.is' "page notes" functionality to create a bookmark-like annotation into which I will frequently post the URL of the page and occasionally a summary of a piece, these are imported into my system and are used as source/bibliographic information. I also have some dovetailing with Zotero as a bibliographic set up which feeds into this data as well.

      This version which I've cobbled together works well for me so that I'm not missing anything, but there are definitely other similar processes available out there both for Obsidian (with plugins or scripts) as well as for other platforms. If I'm not mistaken, I think Readwise (a paid solution) has a set up for note transfer and formatting.

      WordPress

      As there isn't an extant Micropub client for Hypothes.is I initially used RSS as a transport layer to get my notes from Hypothes.is into WordPress. The fidelity isn't great in part because RSS doesn't include any tags. To get some slightly better presentation I set up a workflow using RSS output from Hypothes.is as input into an IFTTT workflow which outputs to a webhook that stands in as a Micropub client targeting my websites Micropub server. Some of the display on my site is assisted by using the Post Kinds plugin, which I know you've been working around yourself. The details may be above some, but I've outlined most of the broad strokes of how this is done in a tutorial at https://boffosocko.com/2020/01/21/using-ifttt-to-syndicate-pesos-content-from-social-services-to-wordpress-using-micropub/. In that example, I use the service Pocket as an example, but Hypothes.is specific information could easily be swapped out on a 1-1 basis.

      A custom stand-alone or even an integrated micropub client for Hypothes.is would be a fantastic project if someone wanted to dig into the details and dovetail it with the Hypothes.is API.

      Why

      Ideally, I'm hoping that small pieces loosely joined and IndieWeb building blocks will allow me to use the tools and have the patterns I'm looking for, without a lot of work, so that I can easily make annotations with Hypothes.is but have and share (POSSE) my content on my own site in a way that works much the way many IndieWeb sites dovetail with Twitter or Mastodon.

      I'm doing some portions of it manually at present, without a lot of overhead, but it would be fun to see someone add micropub and webmention capabilities to Hypothes.is or other IndieWeb building blocks. (I suspect it won't be Hypothes.is themselves as their team is very small and they're already spread thin on multiple other mission critical projects.)

      In the end, I'm using Hypothes.is as a well designed and convenient tool for quickly making notes on digital documents. All the data is flowing to one of two other locations where I'm actually making use of it. While there is some social layer there, I'm getting email notifications through the Hypothes.is settings and the data from my responses just gets rolled back into my spaces which I try to keep open and IndieWeb friendly by default. At the same time, for those who want or need it, Hypothes.is' interface is a great way of reading, searching, sorting, and interacting with my notes in public, particularly until I get something specific and user friendly up to do it on my own domain.

  20. Mar 2022
  21. Feb 2022
    1. How to Convert Adobe XD to WordPress within minutes

      One can easily convert Adobe XD website UI designed into a responsive and bug-free WordPress website. There are many ways to do the Adobe XD to WordPress conversion. The blog covers the most easier and prevalent ways of converting Adobe XD to WordPress website.

    1. Do you want to convert your HTML website to a WordPress website? But don’t know how? This blog will tell you three simple ways to convert your HTML website to a WordPress theme.

      WordPress allows people to create websites with no coding experience. Most people who still use HTML websites don’t know- how to convert them into a WordPress site, especially without losing content or needing to do excessive formatting on a page-by-page basis.

      Thankfully there are many ways to move from Static HTML to WordPress. This blog will see three different options to convert HTML to WordPress.

    1. In this article, we are going to discuss the topic of mega menus, and how to add a mega menu to a WordPress site. We will explore what a mega menu is, why is it beneficial, and what is the best WordPress plugin for adding a mega menu to your blog.

      Easy to follow tutorial on how to add a mega menu to WordPress.

  22. Jan 2022
    1. https://diggingthedigital.com/een-alternatief-voor-post-kinds/

      I know some of your pains Frank. I do wish that someone might come along and help David Shanske convert the plugin for Gutenberg use.

      The thing I love the most is that the plugin does its best to provide excellent reply contexts.

  23. Dec 2021
  24. Nov 2021
    1. I’ve been casually looking into WordPress themes designed for news websites since they’re often broken into categories, but haven’t found anything I liked so far.

      I haven't had time to look into it yet, but Piper has a custom WordPress theme she's created specifically for commonplace books: https://github.com/piperhaywood/commonplace-wp-theme

  25. Oct 2021
    1. Website by Stephen Bau

      I used a UIkit theme (Trek) for the redesign of the Run for Water site. I transitioned away from Jamstack, because the organization is centred around volunteers, and it was important to empower them to easily make changes to the marketing front end of their organization.

      The WordPress theme has a beautiful interface for managing content. However, it goes against the philosophy of COPE, recommended by Karen McGrane in her presentations on Content in a Zombie Apocalypse.

  26. getuikit.com getuikit.com
    1. WordPress & Joomla from the UIkit creators

      Run for Water

      I used one of these themes for the redesign of the Run for Water site. I transitioned away from Jamstack, because the organization is centred around volunteers, and it was important to empower them to easily make changes to the marketing front end of their organization. The WordPress theme has a beautiful interface for managing content. However, it goes against the philosophy of COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere), recommended by Karen McGrane in her presentations on Content in a Zombie Apocalypse.

      Symphony

      My interest in the subject of Adaptive Content goes back to the days when Symphony was my tool of choice.

  27. Sep 2021
  28. Aug 2021
    1. For someone who wants to extend the platform, particularly developers, my best advice would be to ignore the hype. For now things can still be built without all the fancy tools. The difference is that I think it is safe to say few getting into WordPress development will have the next big plugin or theme. What is more likely is that new developers in WordPress will have rewarding careers working for hosts and other larger, established companies in the space.

      The higher complexity also means more power will be placed in the hands of Automattic and their engineers. The previously more open platform will tend to be more closed and the cash flows will move in the direction of a much smaller group of larger corporations.

      To some extent Drupal made their core product more difficult to use starting around 2015. WordPress seems to be following suit, but with a slightly different flavor.

  29. Jul 2021
    1. WordPress 5.8 “Tatum” Introduces Block Widgets

      WP Tavern: New on tap...

      'Users can now use them in any available sidebar."

  30. Jun 2021
    1. Ran across via https://openlibrary.org/developers/api

      OpenBook WordPress Plug-in by John Miedema OpenBook is useful for anyone who wants to add book covers and other book data on a WordPress website. OpenBook links to detailed book information in Open Library, the main data source, as well as other book sites. Users have complete control over the display through templates. OpenBook can link to library records by configuring an OpenURL resolver or through a WorldCat link. OpenBook inserts COinS so that other applications like Zotero can pick up the book data.

  31. May 2021
    1. This runs counter to the time-based structure of traditional blogs: posts presented in reverse chronological order based on publication date.

      Admittedly many blogs primarily operate on time-based order, but it would be fun if more digital gardens provided a most-recently updated feed of their content.

      This particular article is a case in point. I've read it before in an earlier stage and want to follow updates to it. I can subscribe to Maggie's feed, but currently her most recent post in my reader is dated 3 weeks ago. Without seeing a ping from another service to see the notification, I would have missed the significant update to this piece which has prompted me to re-read it for updates on the ideas contained in it.

      Some platforms like MediaWiki do provide feeds for recently updated. My colleague David Shanske has recently updated a WordPress plugin he built so that it provides WordPress sites with a feed for most recent updates, so that one would see not only new content, but also content which is added or updated from the past. As a result, here's his "updated feed" https://david.shanske.com/updated/feed/ which is cleverly useful.

    1. This is a rather cool find and I can think of a few ways of using it.

      Being able to add widgets easily to the dashboard can be a highly useful thing!

      Also having the ability to easily add an admin page in the menu could be incredibly helpful in this setting.