24 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
    1. The xdocdiff PDF plugin uses a very old version of xdoc2txt (1.46). One of the features I was looking for, and found, in the latest version(2.20) is that it doesn't drop the space between two words when the font style changes from bold back to regular. The latest (as of September 2020) version of xdoc2txt can be obtained from http://ebstudio.info/home/xdoc2txt.html Installation is as easy as unpacking the xd2tx220.zip, and copying the new xdoc2txt.exe over the top of the version from xdocdiff (in the WinMerge executeable directory). I also copied the xd2txlib.dll into the same folder (possibly unnecessary, but disk is cheaper than time to translate the docs). The interface between versions 1.46 & 2.20 may have changed, but not enough to break WinMerge. Important, you will need to install the original xdocdiff plugin first (so you get the amb_xdocdiffPlugin.dll) which drives the whole process.
      • NEW VERSION .EXE
      • TESTED: OK
    2. Steps 1. Download and extract the xdocdiff archive to a temporary folder 2. Copy the files "zlib.dll" and "xdoc2txt.exe" to both of the following folders inside your WinMerge Portable folders: WinMergePortable\App\WinMerge\ WinMergePortable\App\WinMerge64\ 4. Copy the file "MergePlugins\amb_xdocdiffPlugin.dll" to both of the following folders: WinMergePortable-xdocdiff\App\WinMerge\MergePlugins WinMergePortable-xdocdiff\App\WinMerge64\MergePlugins 5. Launch "WinMergePortable.exe" 6. From the menu, select Plugins - Automatic Unpacking 7. From the menu select Plugins - Plugin Settings and make sure all boxes are checked --- To test with some documents, click File - Open and select 1, 2, or 3 documents to compare. If you have issues, set the File: Unpacker plugin in the Open window to "Automatic." ---
      • INSTRUCTIONS
      • TESTED: OK
    1. Ver2.x(Unicode版) New ! 2020/6/26 xdoc2txt 2.20 ( xd2tx220_x64.zip ) - x64(64bit版) xdoc2txt 2.20 ( xd2tx220.zip ) - x86(32bit)版
      • TESTED 32b
  2. Jun 2022
  3. Apr 2022
    1. ``js let originalHTML =

      Hello Mr. Wayne, decide what to do:

      • Call Alfred
      • Take Thalia Al Gul to the cinema
      • Save Gotham
      <span>Use the mouse to choose an option.</span> `;

      let newHTML = `

      Hello Batman, decide what to do:

      • Kill The Joker
      • Save Thalia Al Gul
      • Save Gotham

      <span>Use the batarang to choose an option.</span> `;

      // Diff HTML strings let output = htmldiff(originalHTML, newHTML);

      // Show HTML diff output as HTML (crazy right?)! document.getElementById("output").innerHTML = output; ```

      ```css ins { text-decoration: none; background-color: #d4fcbc; }

      del { text-decoration: line-through; background-color: #fbb6c2; color: #555; } ```

  4. Mar 2022
  5. Dec 2021
    1. If you want to restore the old behavior (thus not reaching level AA), you can apply the following diff: -<Tooltip> +<Tooltip disableInteractive> # Interactive tooltips no longer need the `interactive` prop. -<Tooltip interactive> +<Tooltip>

      How would you even apply this "diff"? I assume this is supposed to just be a hint for what you should look for and either manually or automatically do a global search and replace for (no search and replace tool that I know of accepts a diff instead of search and replace strings, but I guess they are functionally the same thing).

  6. May 2021
    1. Normally, git diff looks for non-printable characters in the files and if it looks like the file is likely to be a binary file, it refuses to show the difference. The rationale for that is binary file diffs are not likely to be human readable and will probably mess up your terminal if displayed. However, you can instruct git diff to always treat files as text using the --text option. You can specify this for one diff command: git diff --text HEAD HEAD^ file.txt You can make Git always use this option by setting up a .gitattributes file that contains: file.txt diff
  7. Apr 2021
    1. We recommend that patients with a moderate familial CRC risk should have a one-off colonoscopy at age 55 years. (GRADE of evidence: moderate; Strength of recommendation: strong)

      No longer mod and high-mod just moderate.

  8. Mar 2021
    1. here is my set of best practices.I review libraries before adding them to my project. This involves skimming the code or reading it in its entirety if short, skimming the list of its dependencies, and making some quality judgements on liveliness, reliability, and maintainability in case I need to fix things myself. Note that length isn't a factor on its own, but may figure into some of these other estimates. I have on occasion pasted short modules directly into my code because I didn't think their recursive dependencies were justified.I then pin the library version and all of its dependencies with npm-shrinkwrap.Periodically, or when I need specific changes, I use npm-check to review updates. Here, I actually do look at all the changes since my pinned version, through a combination of change and commit logs. I make the call on whether the fixes and improvements outweigh the risk of updating; usually the changes are trivial and the answer is yes, so I update, shrinkwrap, skim the diff, done.I prefer not to pull in dependencies at deploy time, since I don't need the headache of github or npm being down when I need to deploy, and production machines may not have external internet access, let alone toolchains for compiling binary modules. Npm-pack followed by npm-install of the tarball is your friend here, and gets you pretty close to 100% reproducible deploys and rollbacks.This list intentionally has lots of judgement calls and few absolute rules. I don't follow all of them for all of my projects, but it is what I would consider a reasonable process for things that matter.
  9. Jul 2020
    1. terNative has been the leading source for scholarship by Indigenous peoples and for those working alongside and with Indigenous communities.

      has been known to a topical __ alt.net

  10. May 2020
  11. Sep 2018