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  1. Last 7 days
    1. Cut and erase artwork Transform your artwork by cutting and erasing content.
    2. Transform artwork Learn how to transform artwork with the Selection tool, Transform panel, and various transform tools.
    1. Scale objects Scaling an object enlarges or reduces it horizontally (along the x axis), vertically (along the y axis), or both. Objects scale relative to a reference point which varies depending on the scaling method you choose. You can change the default reference point for most scaling methods, and you can also lock the proportions of an object.
  2. Dec 2019
    1. Fortunately, the latest-model iPhones feature camera resolutions up to 12 MP; and DSLR cameras often feature 18 MP and up, so you don’t need to be a professional photographer to start with a high-resolution image.
    2. Another name for 7.2 million pixels is 7.2 megapixels (MP); which means you’ll need a minimum 7.2 MP camera to get the best resolution for your 8” x 10” photo.
    3. You can multiply both 8 and 10 by 300 to get the full pixel dimensions of the finished image. 8(300) X 10(300) = 2,400px X 3,000px You can multiply both 8 and 10 by 300 to get the full pixel dimensions of the finished image. 2,400 X 3,000 = 7.2 million pixels
    4. What is the best resolution for printing? What resolution should photos be for printing? What should DPI (or PPI) be for printing high-quality artwork? In many cases, the best resolution for printing is 300 PPI.
    5. Often, PPI and dots per inch (DPI) are used interchangeably; however, PPI and DPI are not identical. Though they are similar, PPI refers to the pixels per inch on your computer screen, while DPI refers to the ink dots per inch applied by a printing press.
    6. What is image resolution? Image resolution can be defined as the level of detail in an image. Raster images are comprised of a series of pixels, where resolution is the]]> total number of pixels along an image’s width and height]]>, expressed as pixels per inch (PPI).
    1. For the first time, a nonresident alien can take an equity stake in an S corporation, albeit indirectly as a trust beneficiary, without terminating the ESBT and S corporation statuses. This change presents a new opportunity for a nonresident alien to invest in an S corporation without compromising the entity's S corporation status. To be clear, the long-standing prohibition on a nonresident alien's being a direct S corporation shareholder (Sec. 1361(b)(1)(C)) was left intact. Accordingly, it is still necessary to ensure that under no circumstance could the trust distribute S corporation shares to a nonresident alien beneficiary, as such a distribution would jeopardize the trust's status as an ESBT as well as the S corporation status.
    1. Out-of-pocket Limit The most you could pay during a coverage period (usually one year) for your share of the costs of covered services. After you meet this limit the plan will usually pay 100% of the allowed amount. This limit helps you plan for health care costs. This limit never includes your premium, balance-billed charges or health care your plan doesn’t cover. Some plans don’t count all of your copayments, deductibles, coinsurance payments, out-of-network payments, or other expenses toward this limit. See a detailed example.
    2. How You and Your Insurer Share Costs - Example Jane’s Plan Deductible: $1,500 Coinsurance: 20% Out-of-Pocket Limit: $5,000
    1. Welcome to Matrix 3.0 Matrix showcases some of the freshest travel search ideas from ITA Software. Version 3.0 has been completely rebuilt to run on Google technology. Let us know what you think. Cost per mile filter Geo Search – search by airport code, city, or nearby airport Interactive Calendar – explore date ranges and lowest fares Real-time Filters – focus on flights that suit your preferences Color-coded Time Bars – compare flights at a glance
    1. ITA Matrix is a no-frills way to find the cheapest-possible flight thanks to its handy calendar index, which allows users to see the best possible itinerary.All you have to do is search your destination and preferred length of stay and click on "See calendar of lowest fares." The flexible search option lets travelers see what flying on each day of the week would cost them.
    1. Theme Store You may establish the appearance of your Shopify Store with a design template from Shopify’s Theme Store (“a Theme”). If you download a Theme, you are licensed to use it for a single Store only. You are free to transfer a Theme to a second one of your own Stores if you close your first Store. To initiate a transfer of a Theme to a second one of your Stores, please contact Shopify Support. You are not permitted to transfer or sell a Theme to any other person’s Store on Shopify or elsewhere. Multiple Stores require multiple downloads and each download is subject to the applicable fee. Shopify gives no assurance that a particular Theme will remain available for additional downloads.
    2. Staff Accounts Based on your Shopify pricing plan, you can create one or more staff accounts (“Staff Accounts”) allowing other people to access the Account. With Staff Accounts, the Store Owner can set permissions and let other people work in their Account while determining the level of access by Staff Accounts to specific business information (for example, you can limit Staff Account access to sales information on the Reports page or prevent Staff Accounts from changing general store settings).
    3. Your Shopify Store can only be associated with one Store Owner. A Store Owner may have multiple Shopify Stores. “Store” means the online store or physical retail location(s) associated with the Account.
    4. To access and use the Services, you must register for a Shopify account (“Account”) by providing your full legal name, current address, phone number, a valid email address, and any other information indicated as required.
    1. These Web pages presents a set of examples using ImageMagick ("IM," for short) from the command line. However, they also illustrate what can be done using the ImageMagick Application Programming Interface (API). As such, these pages should be the first stop for IM users after reading the terse Command Line (CLI) Option manuals.
    1. We see that ImageMagick is very good about preserving aspect ratios of images, to prevent distortion of your favorite photos and images. But you might really want the dimensions to be 100x200, thereby stretching the image. In this case just tell ImageMagick you really mean it (!) by appending an exclamation operator to the geometry. This will force the image size to exactly what you specify. So, for example, if you specify 100x200! the dimensions will become exactly 100x200 (giving a small, vertically elongated wizard)
    2. Image Geometry Many command-line options take a geometry argument to specify such things as the desired width and height of an image and other dimensional quantities. Because users want so many variations on the resulting dimensions, sizes, and positions of images (and because ImageMagick wants to provide them), the geometry argument can take many forms. We describe many of these in this section. The image options and settings that take some form of a geometry argument include the following. Keep in mind that some of these parse their arguments in slightly different ways. See the documentation for the individual option or setting for more specifics. ‑adaptive‑resize • ‑border • ‑borderwidth • ‑chop • ‑crop • ‑density • ‑extent • ‑extract • ‑frame • ‑geometry • ‑iconGeometry • ‑liquid‑rescale • ‑page • ‑region • ‑repage • ‑resize • ‑sample • ‑scale • ‑shave • ‑splice • ‑thumbnail • ‑window The geometry argument might take any of the forms listed in the table below. These will described in more detail in the subsections following the table. The usual form is size[offset], meaning size is required and offset is optional. Occasionally, [size]offset is possible. In no cases are spaces permitted within the geometry argument. size General description (actual behavior can vary for different options and settings) scale% Height and width both scaled by specified percentage. scale-x%xscale-y% Height and width individually scaled by specified percentages. (Only one % symbol needed.) width Width given, height automagically selected to preserve aspect ratio. xheight Height given, width automagically selected to preserve aspect ratio. widthxheight Maximum values of height and width given, aspect ratio preserved. widthxheight^ Minimum values of width and height given, aspect ratio preserved. widthxheight! Width and height emphatically given, original aspect ratio ignored. widthxheight> Shrinks an image with dimension(s) larger than the corresponding width and/or height argument(s). widthxheight< Enlarges an image with dimension(s) smaller than the corresponding width and/or height argument(s). area@ Resize image to have specified area in pixels. Aspect ratio is preserved. x:y Here x and y denotes an aspect ratio (e.g. 3:2 = 1.5). {size}{offset} Specifying the offset (default is +0+0). Below, {size} refers to any of the forms above. {size}{+-}x{+-}y Horizontal and vertical offsets x and y, specified in pixels. Signs are required for both. Offsets are affected by ‑gravity setting. Offsets are not affected by % or other size operators. Note that positive X and Y offsets are in the inward direction towards the center of the image for all ‑gravity options, except 'center'. For East, +X is left. For South, +Y is up. For SouthEast, +X is left and +Y is up. For center, the normal X and Y directional convention is used (+X is right and +Y is down). Basic adjustments to width and height; the operators %, ^, and ! Here, just below, are a few simple examples of geometry, showing how it might be used as an argument to the ‑resize option. We'll use the internal image logo: for our input image. This fine image is 640 pixels wide and 480 pixels high. We say its dimensions are 640x480. When we give dimensions of an image, the width (the horizontal dimension) always precedes the height (the vertical dimension). This will be true when we speak of coordinates or offsets into an image, which will always be x–value followed by y. Just think of your high school algebra classes and the xy–plane. (Well, almost: our y–axis will always go downward!) magick logo: -resize '200%' bigWiz.png magick logo: -resize '200x50%' longShortWiz.png magick logo: -resize '100x200' notThinWiz.png magick logo: -resize '100x200^' biggerNotThinWiz.png magick logo: -resize '100x200!' dochThinWiz.png The first of the four commands is simple—it stretches both the width and height of the input image by 200% in each direction; it magnifies the whole thing by a factor of two. The second command specifies different percentages for each direction, stretching the width to 200% and squashing the height to 50%. The resulting image (in this example) has dimensions 1280x240. Notice that the percent symbol needn't be repeated; the following are equivalent: 200x50%, 200%x50, 200%x50%. By default, the width and height given in a geometry argument are maximum values unless a percentage is specified. That is, the image is expanded or contracted to fit the specified width and height value while maintaining the aspect ratio (the ratio of its height to its width) of the image. For instance, the third command above "tries" to set the dimensions to 100x200. Imagine gradually shrinking the original image (which is 640x480), keeping is aspect ratio constant, until it just fits into a 100x200 rectangle. Since the image is longer than it is tall, it will fit when its width shrinks to 100 pixels. To preserve the aspect ratio, the height will therefore have to be (480/640)×100 pixels=75 pixels, so the final dimensions will be 100x75. Notice that in the previous example, at least one of the specified dimensions will be attained (in this case, the width, 100 pixels). The resulting image fits snugly within the original. One can do just the opposite of this by invoking the ^ operator, as in the fourth example above. In that case, when 100x200^ is given as the argument, again at least one of the dimensions will be attained, but in this case the resulting image can snugly contain the original. Here the geometry argument gives minimum values. In our example, the height will become 200 and the width will be scaled to preserve the aspect ratio, becoming (640/480)×200 pixels=267 pixels. With the ^ operator, one of those dimensions will match the requested size, but the image will likely overflow the dimensions requested to preserve its aspect ratio. (The ^ feature is new as of IM 6.3.8-2.) We see that ImageMagick is very good about preserving aspect ratios of images, to prevent distortion of your favorite photos and images. But you might really want the dimensions to be 100x200, thereby stretching the image. In this case just tell ImageMagick you really mean it (!) by appending an exclamation operator to the geometry. This will force the image size to exactly what you specify. So, for example, if you specify 100x200! the dimensions will become exactly 100x200 (giving a small, vertically elongated wizard). Bounding the width, height, and area; the operators >, <, and @ Here are a few more examples: magick logo: -resize '100' wiz1.png magick logo: -resize 'x200' wiz2.png magick logo: -resize '100x200>' wiz3.png magick logo: -resize '100x200<' wiz4.png If only one dimension is given it is taken to be the width. When only the width is specified, as in the first example above, the width is accepted as given and the height is chosen to maintain the aspect ratio of the input image. Similarly, if only the height is specified, as in the second example above, the height is accepted and the width is chosen to maintain the aspect ratio. Use > to shrink an image only if its dimension(s) are larger than the corresponding width and/or height arguments. Use < to enlarge an image only if its dimension(s) are smaller than the corresponding width and/or height arguments. In either case, if a change is made, the result is as if the > or < operator was not present. So, in the third example above, we specified 100x200> and the original image size is 640x480, so the image size is reduced as if we had specified 100x200. However, in the fourth example above, there will be no change to its size. Finally, use @ to specify the maximum area in pixels of an image, again while attempting to preserve aspect ratio. (Pixels take only integer values, so some approximation is always at work.) In the following example, an area of 10000 pixels is requested. The resulting file has dimensions 115x86, which has 9890 pixels. magick logo: -resize '10000@' wiz10000.png In all the examples above and below, we have enclosed the geometry arguments within quotation marks. Doing so is optional in many cases, but not always. We must enclose the geometry specifications in quotation marks when using < or > to prevent these characters from being interpreted by the shell as file redirection. On Windows systems, the carat ^ needs to be within quotes, else it is ignored. To be safe, one should probably maintain a habit of enclosing all geometry arguments in quotes, as we have here. Offsets in geometry Here are some examples to illustrate the use of offsets in geometry arguments. One typical use of offsets is in conjunction with the ‑region option. This option allows many other options to modify the pixels within a specified rectangular subregion of an image. As such, it needs to be given the width and height of that region, and also an offset into the image, which is a pair of coordinates that indicate the location of the region within the larger image. Below, in the first example, we specify a region of size 100x200 to be located at the xy–coordinates x=10, y=20. Let's use the usual algebraic notation (x,y)=(10,20), for convenience. magick logo: -region '100x200+10+20' -negate wizNeg1.png magick logo: -region '100x200-10+20' -negate wizNeg2.png magick logo: -gravity center -region '100x200-10+20' -negate wizNeg3.png Note that offsets always require +/− signs. The offset is not actually a true location within the image; its coordinates must be added to some other location. Let's refer to that as the current location. In the first two examples above, though, that location is the upper-left hand corner of the image, which has coordinates (0,0). (That is the default situation when there are no other directives given to change it.) The first example above puts the 100x200 rectangle's own upper-left corner at (10,20). A negative offset can make sense in many cases. In the second example above, the offset is (-10,20), specified by -10+20. In that case, only the portion of the (virtual) rectangle obtained that lies within the image can be negated; here it is equivalent to specifying the geometry as 90x200+0+20. In the third example above, the ‑gravity setting precedes the others and sets the current location within the image at the very center of the image. In this case that is at pixel (320,240), since the size of the image is 640x480. This means that the offsets apply to that location, which thereby gets moved, in this case, to (320-10,240+20)=(310,260). But the 100x200 region itself is affected by the ‑gravity setting, so instead of affecting its upper-left corner, the region's own center (at (+50,+100) within it) is determined. Therefore the center of the 100x200 rectangle is moved to (310,260). The negated rectangle's upper-left corner is now at (310-50,260-100)=(260,160).
  3. Nov 2019
    1. Use ImageMagick® to create, edit, compose, or convert bitmap images. It can read and write images in a variety of formats (over 200) including PNG, JPEG, GIF, HEIC, TIFF, DPX, EXR, WebP, Postscript, PDF, and SVG. Use ImageMagick to resize, flip, mirror, rotate, distort, shear and transform images, adjust image colors, apply various special effects, or draw text, lines, polygons, ellipses and Bézier curves.
    1. How you use our services and your devicesThis includes: call records containing phone numbers you call and receive calls from, websites you visit, text records, wireless location, application and feature usage, product and device-specific information and identifiers, router connections, service options you choose, mobile and device numbers, video streaming and video packages and usage, movie rental and purchase data, TV and video viewership, and other similar information.
    2. Demographic and interest dataFor example, this information could include gender, age range, education level, sports enthusiast, frequent diner and other demographics and interests.
    3. Information from social media platformsThis may include interests, "likes" and similar information you permit social media companies to share in this way.
    4. Information from Verizon MediaFor example, we may receive information from Verizon Media to help us understand your interests to help make our advertising more relevant to you.
    5. Learn about the information Verizon collects about you, your devices and your use of products and services we provide. We collect information when you interact with us and use our products and services. The types of information we collect depends on your use of our products and services and the ways that you interact with us. This may include information about: Contact, billing and other information you provide 1 How you use our services and your devices 2 How you use our websites and apps 3 How our network and your devices are working 4 Location of your wireless devices

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  4. Jan 2019