61 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2019
    1. These Web pages presents a set of examples using ImageMagick ("IM," for short) from the command line. However, they also illustrate what can be done using the ImageMagick Application Programming Interface (API). As such, these pages should be the first stop for IM users after reading the terse Command Line (CLI) Option manuals.
    1. We see that ImageMagick is very good about preserving aspect ratios of images, to prevent distortion of your favorite photos and images. But you might really want the dimensions to be 100x200, thereby stretching the image. In this case just tell ImageMagick you really mean it (!) by appending an exclamation operator to the geometry. This will force the image size to exactly what you specify. So, for example, if you specify 100x200! the dimensions will become exactly 100x200 (giving a small, vertically elongated wizard)
    2. Image Geometry Many command-line options take a geometry argument to specify such things as the desired width and height of an image and other dimensional quantities. Because users want so many variations on the resulting dimensions, sizes, and positions of images (and because ImageMagick wants to provide them), the geometry argument can take many forms. We describe many of these in this section. The image options and settings that take some form of a geometry argument include the following. Keep in mind that some of these parse their arguments in slightly different ways. See the documentation for the individual option or setting for more specifics. ‑adaptive‑resize • ‑border • ‑borderwidth • ‑chop • ‑crop • ‑density • ‑extent • ‑extract • ‑frame • ‑geometry • ‑iconGeometry • ‑liquid‑rescale • ‑page • ‑region • ‑repage • ‑resize • ‑sample • ‑scale • ‑shave • ‑splice • ‑thumbnail • ‑window The geometry argument might take any of the forms listed in the table below. These will described in more detail in the subsections following the table. The usual form is size[offset], meaning size is required and offset is optional. Occasionally, [size]offset is possible. In no cases are spaces permitted within the geometry argument. size General description (actual behavior can vary for different options and settings) scale% Height and width both scaled by specified percentage. scale-x%xscale-y% Height and width individually scaled by specified percentages. (Only one % symbol needed.) width Width given, height automagically selected to preserve aspect ratio. xheight Height given, width automagically selected to preserve aspect ratio. widthxheight Maximum values of height and width given, aspect ratio preserved. widthxheight^ Minimum values of width and height given, aspect ratio preserved. widthxheight! Width and height emphatically given, original aspect ratio ignored. widthxheight> Shrinks an image with dimension(s) larger than the corresponding width and/or height argument(s). widthxheight< Enlarges an image with dimension(s) smaller than the corresponding width and/or height argument(s). area@ Resize image to have specified area in pixels. Aspect ratio is preserved. x:y Here x and y denotes an aspect ratio (e.g. 3:2 = 1.5). {size}{offset} Specifying the offset (default is +0+0). Below, {size} refers to any of the forms above. {size}{+-}x{+-}y Horizontal and vertical offsets x and y, specified in pixels. Signs are required for both. Offsets are affected by ‑gravity setting. Offsets are not affected by % or other size operators. Note that positive X and Y offsets are in the inward direction towards the center of the image for all ‑gravity options, except 'center'. For East, +X is left. For South, +Y is up. For SouthEast, +X is left and +Y is up. For center, the normal X and Y directional convention is used (+X is right and +Y is down). Basic adjustments to width and height; the operators %, ^, and ! Here, just below, are a few simple examples of geometry, showing how it might be used as an argument to the ‑resize option. We'll use the internal image logo: for our input image. This fine image is 640 pixels wide and 480 pixels high. We say its dimensions are 640x480. When we give dimensions of an image, the width (the horizontal dimension) always precedes the height (the vertical dimension). This will be true when we speak of coordinates or offsets into an image, which will always be x–value followed by y. Just think of your high school algebra classes and the xy–plane. (Well, almost: our y–axis will always go downward!) magick logo: -resize '200%' bigWiz.png magick logo: -resize '200x50%' longShortWiz.png magick logo: -resize '100x200' notThinWiz.png magick logo: -resize '100x200^' biggerNotThinWiz.png magick logo: -resize '100x200!' dochThinWiz.png The first of the four commands is simple—it stretches both the width and height of the input image by 200% in each direction; it magnifies the whole thing by a factor of two. The second command specifies different percentages for each direction, stretching the width to 200% and squashing the height to 50%. The resulting image (in this example) has dimensions 1280x240. Notice that the percent symbol needn't be repeated; the following are equivalent: 200x50%, 200%x50, 200%x50%. By default, the width and height given in a geometry argument are maximum values unless a percentage is specified. That is, the image is expanded or contracted to fit the specified width and height value while maintaining the aspect ratio (the ratio of its height to its width) of the image. For instance, the third command above "tries" to set the dimensions to 100x200. Imagine gradually shrinking the original image (which is 640x480), keeping is aspect ratio constant, until it just fits into a 100x200 rectangle. Since the image is longer than it is tall, it will fit when its width shrinks to 100 pixels. To preserve the aspect ratio, the height will therefore have to be (480/640)×100 pixels=75 pixels, so the final dimensions will be 100x75. Notice that in the previous example, at least one of the specified dimensions will be attained (in this case, the width, 100 pixels). The resulting image fits snugly within the original. One can do just the opposite of this by invoking the ^ operator, as in the fourth example above. In that case, when 100x200^ is given as the argument, again at least one of the dimensions will be attained, but in this case the resulting image can snugly contain the original. Here the geometry argument gives minimum values. In our example, the height will become 200 and the width will be scaled to preserve the aspect ratio, becoming (640/480)×200 pixels=267 pixels. With the ^ operator, one of those dimensions will match the requested size, but the image will likely overflow the dimensions requested to preserve its aspect ratio. (The ^ feature is new as of IM 6.3.8-2.) We see that ImageMagick is very good about preserving aspect ratios of images, to prevent distortion of your favorite photos and images. But you might really want the dimensions to be 100x200, thereby stretching the image. In this case just tell ImageMagick you really mean it (!) by appending an exclamation operator to the geometry. This will force the image size to exactly what you specify. So, for example, if you specify 100x200! the dimensions will become exactly 100x200 (giving a small, vertically elongated wizard). Bounding the width, height, and area; the operators >, <, and @ Here are a few more examples: magick logo: -resize '100' wiz1.png magick logo: -resize 'x200' wiz2.png magick logo: -resize '100x200>' wiz3.png magick logo: -resize '100x200<' wiz4.png If only one dimension is given it is taken to be the width. When only the width is specified, as in the first example above, the width is accepted as given and the height is chosen to maintain the aspect ratio of the input image. Similarly, if only the height is specified, as in the second example above, the height is accepted and the width is chosen to maintain the aspect ratio. Use > to shrink an image only if its dimension(s) are larger than the corresponding width and/or height arguments. Use < to enlarge an image only if its dimension(s) are smaller than the corresponding width and/or height arguments. In either case, if a change is made, the result is as if the > or < operator was not present. So, in the third example above, we specified 100x200> and the original image size is 640x480, so the image size is reduced as if we had specified 100x200. However, in the fourth example above, there will be no change to its size. Finally, use @ to specify the maximum area in pixels of an image, again while attempting to preserve aspect ratio. (Pixels take only integer values, so some approximation is always at work.) In the following example, an area of 10000 pixels is requested. The resulting file has dimensions 115x86, which has 9890 pixels. magick logo: -resize '10000@' wiz10000.png In all the examples above and below, we have enclosed the geometry arguments within quotation marks. Doing so is optional in many cases, but not always. We must enclose the geometry specifications in quotation marks when using < or > to prevent these characters from being interpreted by the shell as file redirection. On Windows systems, the carat ^ needs to be within quotes, else it is ignored. To be safe, one should probably maintain a habit of enclosing all geometry arguments in quotes, as we have here. Offsets in geometry Here are some examples to illustrate the use of offsets in geometry arguments. One typical use of offsets is in conjunction with the ‑region option. This option allows many other options to modify the pixels within a specified rectangular subregion of an image. As such, it needs to be given the width and height of that region, and also an offset into the image, which is a pair of coordinates that indicate the location of the region within the larger image. Below, in the first example, we specify a region of size 100x200 to be located at the xy–coordinates x=10, y=20. Let's use the usual algebraic notation (x,y)=(10,20), for convenience. magick logo: -region '100x200+10+20' -negate wizNeg1.png magick logo: -region '100x200-10+20' -negate wizNeg2.png magick logo: -gravity center -region '100x200-10+20' -negate wizNeg3.png Note that offsets always require +/− signs. The offset is not actually a true location within the image; its coordinates must be added to some other location. Let's refer to that as the current location. In the first two examples above, though, that location is the upper-left hand corner of the image, which has coordinates (0,0). (That is the default situation when there are no other directives given to change it.) The first example above puts the 100x200 rectangle's own upper-left corner at (10,20). A negative offset can make sense in many cases. In the second example above, the offset is (-10,20), specified by -10+20. In that case, only the portion of the (virtual) rectangle obtained that lies within the image can be negated; here it is equivalent to specifying the geometry as 90x200+0+20. In the third example above, the ‑gravity setting precedes the others and sets the current location within the image at the very center of the image. In this case that is at pixel (320,240), since the size of the image is 640x480. This means that the offsets apply to that location, which thereby gets moved, in this case, to (320-10,240+20)=(310,260). But the 100x200 region itself is affected by the ‑gravity setting, so instead of affecting its upper-left corner, the region's own center (at (+50,+100) within it) is determined. Therefore the center of the 100x200 rectangle is moved to (310,260). The negated rectangle's upper-left corner is now at (310-50,260-100)=(260,160).
  2. Nov 2019
    1. Use ImageMagick® to create, edit, compose, or convert bitmap images. It can read and write images in a variety of formats (over 200) including PNG, JPEG, GIF, HEIC, TIFF, DPX, EXR, WebP, Postscript, PDF, and SVG. Use ImageMagick to resize, flip, mirror, rotate, distort, shear and transform images, adjust image colors, apply various special effects, or draw text, lines, polygons, ellipses and Bézier curves.
  3. Aug 2019
    1. gymnosperms and angiosperms

      Simple image of Angiosperms vs Gymnosperms

    2. ginkgos

      Ginkgos are really neat looking. I also found it interesting that their English name and scientific name are the same. They are very hardy trees and can grow almost anywhere in the US.

    3. cycads.

      A very interesting and ancient group of plants.

  4. Jul 2019
  5. Jun 2019
  6. Mar 2019
    1. The prevalent practice of damaging images of the human form—and the anxiety surrounding the desecration—dates to the beginnings of Egyptian history. Intentionally damaged mummies from the prehistoric period, for example, speak to a “very basic cultural belief that damaging the image damages the person represented,” Bleiberg said. Likewise, how-to hieroglyphics provided instructions for warriors about to enter battle: Make a wax effigy of the enemy, then destroy it. Series of texts describe the anxiety of your own image becoming damaged, and pharaohs regularly issued decrees with terrible punishments for anyone who would dare threaten their likeness.
  7. static.googleusercontent.com static.googleusercontent.com
    1. Multi-digit Number Recognition from Street ViewImagery using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks

    1. E-commerce has special requirements when it comes to showing products for sale online. A uniform look and feel to the products, showing the product rather than background, product alignment, image margins and special requirements per product category characterize e-commerce.

      We have top class designers who is expert on graphics design. We provide clipping path. background remove, image retouching service. We are also expert on eCommerce photo editing.

  8. Feb 2019
    1. <a href="default.asp">  <img src="smiley.gif" alt="HTML tutorial" style="width:42px;height:42px;border:0;"></a>

      Image as a link - Ignore the style="…." part of the tag. Inline styles are bad!

    2. <img src="https://www.w3schools.com/images/w3schools_green.jpg" alt="W3Schools.com">

      Image Tag

  9. Jan 2019
    1. Surface/Interior Depth-Cueing Depth cues can contribute to the three-dimensional quality of projection images by giving perspective to projected structures. The depth-cueing parameters determine whether projected points originating near the viewer appear brighter, while points further away are dimmed linearly with distance. The trade-off for this increased realism is that data points shown in a depth-cued image no longer possess accurate densitometric values. Two kinds of depth-cueing are available: Surface Depth-Cueing and Interior Depth-Cueing. Surface Depth-Cueing works only on nearest-point projections and the nearest-point component of other projections with opacity turned on. Interior Depth-Cueing works only on brightest-point projections. For both kinds, depth-cueing is turned off when set to zero (i.e.100% of intensity in back to 100% of intensity in front) and is on when set at 0 < n 100 (i.e.(100 − n)% of intensity in back to 100% intensity in front). Having independent depth-cueing for surface (nearest-point) and interior (brightest-point) allows for more visualization possibilities.
    2. Opacity Can be used to reveal hidden spatial relationships, especially on overlapping objects of different colors and dimensions. The (surface) Opacity parameter permits the display of weighted combinations of nearest-point projection with either of the other two methods, often giving the observer the ability to view inner structures through translucent outer surfaces. To enable this feature, set Opacity to a value greater than zero and select either Mean Value or Brightest Point projection.
    3. Interpolate Check Interpolate to generate a temporary z-scaled stack that is used to generate the projections. Z-scaling eliminates the gaps seen in projections of volumes with slice spacing greater than 1.0 pixels. This option is equivalent to using the Scale plugin from the TransformJ package to scale the stack in the z-dimension by the slice spacing (in pixels). This checkbox is ignored if the slice spacing is less than or equal to 1.0 pixels.
    4. Lower/Upper Transparency Bound Determine the transparency of structures in the volume. Projection calculations disregard points having values less than the lower threshold or greater than the upper threshold. Setting these thresholds permits making background points (those not belonging to any structure) invisible. By setting appropriate thresholds, you can strip away layers having reasonably uniform and unique intensity values and highlight (or make invisible) inner structures. Note that you can also use Image▷Adjust▷Threshold… [T]↑ to set the transparency bounds.
    1. Orchestrating the execution of many command line tools is a task for Galaxy, while an analysis of life science data with subsequent statistical analysis and visualization is best carried out in KNIME or Orange. Orange with its “ad-hoc” execution of nodes caters to scientists doing quick analyses on small amounts of data, while KNIME is built from the ground up for large tables and images. Noteworthy is that none of the mentioned tools provide image processing capabilities as extensive as those of the KNIME Image Processing plugin (KNIP).
    2. In conclusion, the KNIME Image Processing extensions not only enable scientists to easily mix-and-match image processing algorithms with tools from other domains (e.g. machine-learning), scripting languages (e.g. R or Python) or perform a cross-domain analysis using heterogenous data-types (e.g. molecules or sequences), they also open the doors for explorative design of bioimage analysis workflows and their application to process hundreds of thousands of images.
    3. In order to further foster this “write once, run anywhere” framework, several independent projects collaborated closely in order to create ImageJ-Ops, an extensible Java framework for image processing algorithms. ImageJ-Ops allows image processing algorithms to be used within a wide range of scientific applications, particularly KNIME and ImageJ and consequently, users need not choose between those applications, but can take advantage of both worlds seamlessly.
    4. Most notably, integrating with ImageJ2 and FIJI allows scientists to easily turn ImageJ2 plugins into KNIME nodes, without having to be able to script or program a single line of code
  10. Oct 2018
    1. likewise reward in heaven, victorious recompense in the glory of the skies

      Earthly treasures as an image of heavenly

  11. Sep 2018
  12. Jun 2018
  13. May 2018
    1. You can pull the image on a computer that have access to the internet.

      sudo docker pull ubuntu Then you can save this image to a file

      sudo docker save -o ubuntu_image.docker ubuntu Transfer the file on the offline computer (USB/CD/whatever) and load the image from the file:

      sudo docker load ubuntu_image.docker

  14. Apr 2018
    1. pianoforte

      "A formal term for a piano" (OED). Though, it is smaller than a grand piano. (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

  15. Mar 2018
    1. Szeliski and Shum, 1997

      Creating full view panoramic image mosaics and environment maps, In Proceedings of SIGGRAPH'97, volume 31, pages 251-258 .

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  16. www.cad.zju.edu.cn www.cad.zju.edu.cn
    1. 增大视域

      视域的比较

      • 相机 FOV = 50x35°
      • 人眼 FOV = 200x135°
      • 全景 FOV = 360x180°
  17. Jan 2018
  18. Sep 2017
    1. Being from a family of retailers, one of the first things I learned was that the customer is always right. I didn’t understand the importance of that sentiment back then. But looking back, it’s probably the most important lesson I have ever learned.

      We have manually analyzed our customer reviews, in-depth interviews and on-site analytics to understand what are the customers need and how to give that to them.

  19. Apr 2017
    1. crinoline

      Crinoline is the name of a stiff fabric made of a mix of threads and horsehair. It is most often used for giving structure to petticoats and is a common lining for garments. Hoop skirts are also referred to as a crinoline, due to the majority of its frame support being comprised of the material. Strips of crinoline would be attached to a starting hoop (normally the top hoop that sits at the waist) with heavy thread, wire, or rope. Subsequent hoops of increasing size could be attached while the crinoline is bent down and outward to achieve a noticeable “bell” shape. Cheaply made frames could be fragile and easily damaged by applying pressure to the structure, making sitting and moving around a constant concern for the wearer. Stronger frames were more expensive, but were also much heavier due to the types of materials used. Where lighter frames could be made of soft wood or leather hoops, others were made of whalebone or steel, making for a very cumbersome garment.

      Moving in one of these stronger frames would be even more difficult, not only does the weight slow down the wearer; the unbending frames often make sitting or even passing through narrow openings nearly impossible. Though certain artisans could make changes and generate more user friendly designs, these crinolines would remain burdensome. Many women began to forgo them for lighter and more open options, sometimes referring to them as cages or weights. There are even notable print and stage parodies of these frames that highlight the bulky nature of the frames. Characters comically bump into others, knock over furniture, get stuck in odd places, or are vain caricatures with impossibly wide frames that match their egos.

    2. Turkish trousers

      “Turkish trousers” are the European name for the culturally adopted Ottoman dimije. Dimije are baggy pants that gather just above the ankle, which aid in dispelling heat with their flowing material and breezy nature. Normally worn by common folk in the areas of Turkey, India, and the Middle East, the European empires had influenced widespread cultural mixing via trade and colonization that brought many new styles back West. Fashion began to shift into being a form of self-expression (more like our modern interpretation of the use of clothing) instead of a marker of class level. Women’s movements took in these new cultural styles in order to address oppression by linking traditional clothing models to ideas of confinement, restriction, and encumbrance. These changes of clothing were like shedding of shackles, they became visual political statements that can be made publicly that could harken to the larger movements passively.

    1. The ideal aspect ratio is 3:2. When the image width is 200 pixels, the height should be about 133 pixels. If your height value is substantially different, crop the image to avoid distortion in the thumbnail.

      I noticed that it's blurry, at least for me, when I use paint for this. Rather, I used my computer's default app; snipping tool, and uploaded it onto http://resizepic.com/ to resize the image into exactly 200x133 pixels and it was not blurry.

  20. Jan 2017
  21. Dec 2016
  22. Nov 2016
  23. Oct 2016
    1. Esempi noti di operatori spaziali sono il filtro media, che calcola la media aritmetica dei pixel all'interno della "finestra" e impone tale valore, e il filtro mediano, il quale invece calcola la mediana statistica.

      Alcuni dei principali operatori spaziali utilizzati nell'image processing.

  24. Jun 2016
    1. A case in point is the obliterated text between syððan and þ on fol. 179r10. Any attempt at restoration is complicated by the fact that some of the ink traces, as conclusively shown by an overlay in Electronic Beowulf 4.0, come from an offset from the facing fol. 178v. Digital technology allows us to subtract these false leads and arrive at a more plausible restoration

      Great use of image processing to estimate what could be the conjectural readings.

  25. Jul 2015
  26. May 2015
    1. Petr Pridal, from KlokanTechnologies, Switzerland, gave some insights into Georeferencer, another multi-platform, web based, collections viewer, but specifically designed for the presentation of maps. What makes Georeferencer different is the facility to create anchor points on each map that the user is viewing. This enables each map to move and zoom with the others simultaneously

      Could be interesting for displaying/interacting with GIS/geodata without leaving the browser.

  27. Mar 2015
    1. ImageNet is an image database organized according to the WordNet hierarchy (currently only the nouns), in which each node of the hierarchy is depicted by hundreds and thousands of images. Currently we have an average of over five hundred images per node. We hope ImageNet will become a useful resource for researchers, educators, students and all of you who share our passion for pictures.
  28. Nov 2014
  29. Sep 2014
    1. Cultural imprinting is the mechanism whereby an ad, rather than trying to change our minds individually, instead changes the landscape of cultural meanings — which in turn changes how we are perceived by others when we use a product. Whether you drink Corona or Heineken or Budweiser "says" something about you. But you aren't in control of that message; it just sits there, out in the world, having been imprinted on the broader culture by an ad campaign.

      Yes! Whence the emotional inception. If you don't buy that product that says you're super cool you are then filled with anxiety about whether you're cool. Etc.

      What's being described here isn't some other way in which advertising works other than emotional inception, it's the mechanism of that inception.

  30. Jan 2014
    1. The initial inputs for deriving quantitative information of gene expression and embryonic morphology are raw image data, either of fluorescent proteins expressed in live embryos or of stained fluorescent markers in fixed material. These raw images are then analyzed by computational algorithms that extract features, such as cell location, cell shape, and gene product concentration. Ideally, the extracted features are then recorded in a searchable database, an atlas, that researchers from many groups can access. Building a database with quantitative graphical and visualization tools has the advantage of allowing developmental biologists who lack specialized skills in imaging and image analysis to use their knowledge to interrogate and explore the information it contains.

      1) Initial input is raw image data 2) feature extraction on raw image data 3) extracted features stored in shared, searchable database 4) database available to researchers from many groups 5) quantitative graphical and visualization tools allow access to those without specialized skill in imaging and image analysis

  31. Nov 2013