33 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
  2. Jun 2019
  3. Apr 2019
    1. https://www.9news.com.au/national/60...b-32168ef9b440 A 60 Minutes investigation has revealed that Australia’s attempts to ethically recycle are falling short, causing harm offshore for our international “dumping ground.” Australia has earned the unfortunate title of one of the world’s most wasteful nations, and as our waste crisis worsened the importance of recycling was drilled into the nation. We were encouraged to reduce, reuse, recycle, in a desperate bid to clean up the country. But as 60 Minutes reporter Liam Bartlett revealed, the reality is that much of the public’s efforts to recycle the huge amounts of plastic we consume are often a waste of time. 60 Minutes has tracked mixed plastic waste - the material assumed easiest to salvage and re-use - from the recycling bins of Australian suburbs to dozens of illegal processing sites in Malaysia, where our discarded plastics often end up being dumped, buried or even burned. It’s turned Malaysia into Australia’s dumping ground, with dire consequences including contamination of drinking water and air pollution. Despite so many Australians diligently separating plastics from their general waste and placing it in their recycling bins, very little reprocessing of mixed plastic is happening on home soil - with the exception of milk bottles and soft drink bottles which have a discrete market. Haydn Breheny, who runs a recycling business for industry waste in south-east Melbourne, revealed to 60 Minutes that when plastic arrives at his warehouse, if it can’t be sold to Asian markets then it can’t actually be recycled here in Australia and just ends up in the tip. “Morally, you want to do something for it,” he told Bartlett. “But if I can't get rid of it, what am I meant to do? Eat it myself?” For the last two decades, Australia’s recycling industry has been dependent on China – which had been taking a staggering 125,000 tonnes of our plastic waste every year, sorting it by hand with low labour costs and melting it down into new plastic products to be sold back to us and the rest of the world. But in January 2018 China effectively closed its doors, citing environmental concerns. The decision threw the world’s recycling industry into a tailspin as nations, including Australia, scoured the globe for new buyers. They found them in Southeast Asia, Malaysia in particular, where hundreds of Chinese operators quickly relocated to set up factories, often illegally. These dodgy businessmen then proceeded to buy as much foreign trash as they could get their hands on. Almost overnight Malaysia overtook China as the world’s largest importer of plastic rubbish. Australia alone has dumped more than 71,000 tonnes of it in just 12 months and it’s helping fuel a criminal underworld in plastic recycling, harming the environment and the people of Malaysia. Malaysia’s Environment Minister Yeo Bee Yin has shut down no less than 150 illegal factories since July last year, but admits her country doesn’t have the resources to properly police the unlawful trade in plastic waste. “I want to send [plastic waste] all back to the counties of origin,” the Minister said. “And have to really ask you to solve your own problem.” Because of this, Malaysia has imposed harsher restrictions on imports and new permits. The Minister warned 60 Minutes it’s only the beginning – Malaysia’s doors will soon close on Australian rubbish for good. “I do not blame ordinary Australians,” she told Bartlett. “I think most of the people do not know this is happening. But, now we know that this is happening, we need the solution.”

      Australia needs to manage its own waste. This is an irresponsible and dumb practice.

    1. Two concepts that I’ve been thinking about a lot lately are guilt and responsibility. When it comes to racism in America, I think that guilt and responsibility tend to be seen as more or less the same thing. But I’m beginning to understand how there’s a real difference. As white people, are we guilty for the sins of our forefathers? No, I don’t think so. But are we responsible for them? Yes, I believe we are.
  4. Mar 2017
    1. I am older than most of you. I don’t have time for this if it’s just another System B in disguise.
    2. Is it even possible to have a System A that arises from our own or other’s codings? How will we know that we have not deluded ourselves, that we are so invested in the time and energy and pride of creation that we fall into the sinkhole of bias and blindspot?

      Yer pays yer money and you takes yer choice.

      There is no certainty. Even a well meant action can turn into horror - NB Robespierre.

      http://tachesdesens.blogspot.fr/2016/04/loveterror-and-forgiving.html

    3. Question: are the facilitators and leaders and participants here outsiders or are they ‘rearrangers’? Are we cozy web makers or are we punks? Fuse lit.

      identity

      Can we separate the two extremes ever?

      Unless we are victims or perpetrators...

  5. Sep 2016
    1. Application Modern higher education institutions have unprecedentedly large and detailed collections of data about their students, and are growing increasingly sophisticated in their ability to merge datasets from diverse sources. As a result, institutions have great opportunities to analyze and intervene on student performance and student learning. While there are many potential applications of student data analysis in the institutional context, we focus here on four approaches that cover a broad range of the most common activities: data-based enrollment management, admissions, and financial aid decisions; analytics to inform broad-based program or policy changes related to retention; early-alert systems focused on successful degree completion; and adaptive courseware.

      Perhaps even more than other sections, this one recalls the trope:

      The difference probably comes from the impact of (institutional) “application”.

    2. Responsible Use

      Again, this is probably a more felicitous wording than “privacy protection”. Sure, it takes as a given that some use of data is desirable. And the preceding section makes it sound like Learning Analytics advocates mostly need ammun… arguments to push their agenda. Still, the notion that we want to advocate for responsible use is more likely to find common ground than this notion that there’s a “data faucet” that should be switched on or off depending on certain stakeholders’ needs. After all, there exists a set of data use practices which are either uncontroversial or, at least, accepted as “par for the course” (no pun intended). For instance, we probably all assume that a registrar should receive the grade data needed to grant degrees and we understand that such data would come from other sources (say, a learning management system or a student information system).

  6. Aug 2016
    1. Page 2

      Borgman on the responsibility of rears to assess reliability and the ability of content creators to have control over their work:

      these are exciting and confusing times for scholarship. The proliferation of digital content allows new questions to be asked in new ways, but also results unduplication and dispersion. Authors can disseminate their work more widely by posting online, but readers have the additional responsibility of assessing trust and authenticity. Changes in intellectual property laws give Pharmacontrol to the creators of digital content that was available for printed comment, but the resulting business models often constrain access to scholarly resources. Students acquire an insatiable appetite for digital publications, and then find an graduation that they can barely sample them without institutional affiliations.

  7. Jun 2016
    1. (Who is “we”?)

      As per the linked post:

      Using Snow’s essay as a jumping off point, I want to consider a problem that’s been on my mind a great deal since joining the MIT Media Lab five years ago: how do we help smart, well-meaning people address social problems in ways that make the world better, not worse?

      Not to defend Ethan, but he’s typically quite explicit about such thing. At least, he doesn’t evade responsibility.

      From his about page (also in narrative version in the Do Not Track doc):

      Those annoying pop-up windows? My fault, at least in part. I designed a vertically-oriented popup window that included navigation tools and an ad for inclusion on webpages at some point in late 1996 or early 1997. It was intended to be less intrusive than inserting an ad into the middle of a user’s homepage. I won’t claim responsibility (irresponsibility?) for inventing the damned things, and I disclaim any responsibility for cascading popups, popups that move to the top, and those annoying “bot” windows that open different popups every few minutes. Still, the fault is at least in part mine, and I’m sorry. :-)

  8. Dec 2015
    1. RAJ: You are at a point where you need to see that there is only One Cause, only One Action, only One Life, Mind, Being, Consciousness. This does not mean that everything you seem to experience is included in that One Mind, Being, Consciousness, but it means that the step that needs to be taken here is to not deal with specific little “causes.” It means that it is time to have no other gods but God. I don’t care what anybody else seems to have to be doing at the present moment, or whether they are seeming to have to learn this, or be faced with what you are being faced with. YOU HAVE GOT TO HANDLE THIS AS THOUGH YOU ARE THE ONLY ONE! AND YOU ARE GOING TO HAVE TO HANDLE THIS AS THOUGH THERE IS ONLY ONE PRESENCE AND POWER! The time is past to handle anything from the standpoint of “handling” this or that or the other “thing,“—whether it be thought, belief, object, or circumstance.

      There is only Oneness, one Cause, one Action, one Life, one Mind, one Being, one Consciousness.

      The solution to problems we experience is not to deal with the little "causes" but to lay aside idols and Seek First the Kingdom.

      It doesn't matter what is happening for or with anybody else, it is between you and God.

      Handle the problems you experience as though You are their only cause, as though you are 100% responsible.

      And deal with those problems in Reality - using the only Power and Presence that exists!! That of Being (God).

      Raj is making a strong point here, that: There is no other way.

      Any other way is the way of illusion and illusion is a mistaken idea that has no existence and can therefore never be a solution. Never.

  9. Nov 2015
    1. Somewhat surprisingly, self-compassionate people actually take more responsibility for their actions. In one study, self-compassionate people who got neutral feedback about their speaking skills were more likely to attribute it to their personality (instead of, say, a mean observer) than people with high self-esteem. Mistakes and criticism don’t threaten them as much as they do for people who have to perform well all the time.
    1. RAJ: You must realize, Paul, that the concept of “irresponsibility” is going to present itself to you until you see that the concept of “responsibility” is invalid—except from the ego standpoint. This is because the concept of responsibility implies Being is not Universal, and is not unfolding Itself Universally, with absolute perfection. It implies, therefore, that each tiny, finite mentality must take on responsibility for what needs to be done, and for seeing that it is done in a “principled,” “intelligent,” and “reasonable” way. Responsibility and irresponsibility both fade out of the picture as being as Conscious Being becomes the Place from which all is experienced.

      The idea of being responsible has validity only from an egoic standpoint.

    1. In Jakarta, for example, largechunks of the urban core were cleared of itspoorer residents, replaced with new commer-cial and residential buildings that now, after adecade or so, are being deemed obsolete orstructurally deficient even when they wereimplanted as an instrument of completionor permanence.

      Trends? Realization of how they got rid of the poorer residents?

    1. RAJ: Good morning, Paul. I can see you are definitely in that Place this morning, and that is a wonderful way to start out your day. I would like you to not attempt to take on anything today in the sense of being responsible for it—no matter what you do. I do not mean for you to do nothing, but I mean for you to do it with no sense of personal responsibility. I mean for you to do it from exactly that Place wherein you find yourself at this very moment. You feel somewhat too relaxed to type accurately, but you have already found out to some degree that, as you are very relaxed and not attempting to maintain control over your fingers, your fingers are more accurate and speedier than when control is attempted. You do not have to be concerned that you will become too relaxed. The more relaxed you are, from a three-dimensional standpoint, the more all of You is available to respond to the demands and needs of the moment, and the fulfillment of these will become more simultaneous with the perception of the need.

      That Place is Paul's present experience when he is consciously aware of Being. He is very relaxed and not attempting to control the flow moving through him.

      From this place he is faster and more accurate in his typing in this place of no control.

      The more relaxed he is, from a 3d reference point, the more all of you (Being**) is available in the moment.

      Raj suggests that taking personal responsibility creates the need for control and inhibits the flow of Being (all of you) and replaces it with motivation based on his beliefs and ideas.

    1. Both you and Susan continue as you have been in listening for the direction in which you need to move. I do not want you to throw the responsibility for figuring everything out in my lap. You must continue to be aware that you are yourself, and I am myself. I am doing what I need to do, and you must do what you need to do. Do not give away any responsibility to another at all.

      No one can do it for us....

    2. Both you and Susan continue as you have been in listening for the direction in which you need to move. I do not want you to throw the responsibility for figuring everything out in my lap. You must continue to be aware that you are yourself, and I am myself. I am doing what I need to do, and you must do what you need to do. Do not give away any responsibility to another at all. As I have said before, I cannot help you with things that will deprive you of your own growth. I am here to help, nevertheless.

      Don't give away your power - you are responsible for your own growth.

  10. Oct 2015
    1. This shift would radically change the ethical program of Twitter, shifting more of the responsibility for filtering information from individual users to the company’s algorithms and no doubt making it easier for advertisers to target certain audiences.

      Shift of responsibility equals shift of control and power.

    2. my own concerns with hospitality, guests, and hosts would call into question whether the host (the listowner) is the clear locus of responsibility in such a situation.

      Okay, let me see if I understand this correctly. Responsibility shifts and is not always clear because a host can become a guest and vice versa, not to mention the responsibility of the software program.

    3. Responsibility is not so easily assigned in such instances

      Is this because the software, the ethical program, is what provides the constraint on the network, and not the human user alone?

  11. Sep 2015
    1. The idea of the banality of heroism debunks the myth of the “heroic elect,” a myth that reinforces two basic human tendencies. The first is to ascribe very rare personal characteristics to people who do something special—to see them as superhuman, practically beyond comparison to the rest of us. The second is the trap of inaction—sometimes known as the “bystander effect.” Research has shown that the bystander effect is often motivated by diffusion of responsibility, when different people witnessing an emergency all assume someone else will help. Like the “good guards,” we fall into the trap of inaction when we assume it’s someone else’s responsibility to act the hero.
    1. The dispersal of these people in Brady's is not random, and where people choose to sit or stand in Brady's is closely related to their sex and status in the Brady social hierarchy.

      Clearly, Brady's Bar is only for a select group of people who enjoy being in that atmosphere that focuses on "social hierarchy".. If we're still forming perceptions and making judgments on how we serve customers (and treat co-workers) based off of gender and status.. are we really doing our jobs as socially responsible citizens to improve our society for everyone's benefit?

  12. Jul 2015
    1. We were never commissioned to demand that secular culture reflect biblical principles. We were commissioned to reflect biblical principles in the middle of secular culture, pointing to God’s redemptive story.
  13. Jan 2014
    1. Data reuse. Respondents were asked to indicate whether they have the sole responsibility for approving access to their data. Of those who answered this question, 43% (n=545) have the sole responsibility for all their datasets, 37% (n=466) have for some of their datasets, and 21% (n=266) do not have the sole responsibility.
    1. The Data Life Cycle: An Overview The data life cycle has eight components: Plan : description of the data that will be compiled, and how the data will be managed and made accessible throughout its lifetime Collect : observations are made either by hand or with sensors or other instruments and the data are placed a into digital form Assure : the quality of the data are assured through checks and inspections Describe : data are accurately and thoroughly described using the appropriate metadata standards Preserve : data are submitted to an appropriate long-term archive (i.e. data center ) Discover : potentially useful data are located and obtained, along with the relevant information about the data ( metadata ) Integrate : data from disparate sources are combined to form one homogeneous set of data that can be readily analyzed Analyze : data are analyzed

      The lifecycle according to who? This 8-component description is from the point of view of only the people who obsessively think about this "problem".

      Ask a researcher and I think you'll hear that lifecycle means something like:

      collect -> analyze -> publish
      

      or a more complex data management plan might be:

      ask someone -> receive data in email -> analyze -> cite -> publish -> tenure
      

      To most people lifecycle means "while I am using the data" and archiving means "my storage guy makes backups occasionally".

      Asking people to be aware of the whole cycle outlined here is a non-starter, but I think there is another approach to achieve what we want... dramatic pause [to be continued]

      What parts of this cycle should the individual be responsible for vs which parts are places where help is needed from the institution?

    1. Locally and/or externally focused departments. These departments look almost exclusively to external repositories or locally-provided solutions. To the extent these solutions suffice, the departments may need little help from campus.

      Where do faculty and researchers turn to?

      Patrick:

      Sciences cluster around "me" category.

      Humanities clusters around "others" category.

      Highlight by Chris during today's discussion.

    2. Distribution of departments with respect to responsibility spheres. Ignoring the "Myself" choice, consider clustering the parties potentially responsible for curation mentioned in the survey into three "responsibility spheres": "local" (comprising lab manager, lab research staff, and department); "campus" (comprising campus library and campus IT); and "external" (comprising external data repository, external research partner, funding agency, and the UC Curation Center). Departments can then be positioned on a tri-plot of these responsibility spheres, according to the average of their respondents' answers. For example, all responses from FeministStds (Feminist Studies) were in the campus sphere, and thus it is positioned directly at that vertex. If a vertex represents a 100% share of responsibility, then the dashed line opposite a vertex represents a reduction of that share to 20%. For example, only 20% of ECE's (Electrical and Computer Engineering's) responses were in the campus sphere, while the remaining 80% of responses were evenly split between the local and external spheres, and thus it is positioned at the 20% line opposite the campus sphere and midway between the local and external spheres. Such a plot reveals that departments exhibit different characteristics with respect to curatorial responsibility, and look to different types of curation solutions.

      This section contains an interesting diagram showing the distribution of departments with respect to responsibility spheres:

      http://www.alexandria.ucsb.edu/~gjanee/dc@ucsb/survey/plots/q2.5.png

    3. Responsibility, myself versus others. It may appear that responses to the question of responsibility are bifurcated between "Myself" and all other parties combined. However, respondents who identified themselves as being responsible were more likely than not to identify additional parties that share that responsibility. Thus, curatorial responsibility is seen as a collaborative effort. (The "Nobody" category is a slight misnomer here as it also includes non-responses to this question.)

      This answers my previous question about this survey item:

      https://hypothes.is/a/QrDAnmV8Tm-EkDuHuknS2A

    4. Which parties do you believe have primary responsibility for the curation of your data? Almost all respondents identified themselves as being personally responsible.

      For those that identify themselves as personally responsible would they identify themselves (or their group) as the only ones responsible for the data? Or is there a belief that the institution should also be responsible in some way in addition to themselves?

    5. Researchers view curation as a collaborative activity and collective responsibility.