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  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jul 2021
    1. the underprivileged are priced out of the dental-treatment system yet perversely held responsible for their dental condition.

      How does this happen?

      Is it the idea of "personal responsibility" and "pull yourself up by the bootstraps" philosophy combined with lack of any actual support and/or education?

      There has to be a better phrase or word to define the perverse sort of philosophy espoused by many in the Republican party about this sort of "personal responsibility".

      It feels somewhat akin to the idea of privatize profits and socialize the losses. The social loss is definitely one that is pushed off onto the individual, but who's profiting? Is it really so expensive to fix this problem? Isn't the loss to society and public health akin to the Million Dollar Murray problem?

      Wouldn't each individual's responsibility be better tied to the collective good as well as their own outcomes? How can the two be bound together to improve outcomes for everyone all around?

  3. Jun 2021
    1. Mike: Yeah. I didn't go to school, because my dad thought that if something happened... And I remember one time the cops came to my house, because my little brother was playing outside and it was school hours. And they're like, "What is this kid doing outside?" And I remember him crying outside, because the cops got him. And I was like, "Oh my God, what do I do?"Mike: So I opened the door and my little brother rushes in crying. And then, I don't know, by the grace of God, they left us alone, but they told us that we had to be in school, this and that. And from there we moved. A month later, that's when he got caught up with the thing.Anne: So basically he would go to work, and you would be in charge of the kids?Mike: Yeah.Anne: That's a lot of responsibility to put on—

      Time in the US, Homelife, Parents, Expectations, Siblings, Caring for them

    2. I passed all of them except for my math. My senior year I actually passed it, but I didn't graduate. I just would go to school, literally eat lunch, just get out. It got boring for me and I was really good. I should have never started.

      Time in US - education - dropping out - not graduating

    3. I wanted to do better for myself and for my family, and I felt like that was like a big motivation right there. That push you just need, because you see stuff and you're like, "Dude, I hope that when I have kids, they don't have to go through that." And yeah, that was the push that kind of—

      Time in US - family - having children

    4. Yes. A lot of them. A lot of things. If we didn't do, they probably would have had to do, because if it wasn't me, it would've been the next one. And they did have to go through that stuff too, in a way, because sometimes I couldn't do it, because I'd be in school doing something really, really important.

      Time in US - siblings also take responsibilities - employment

    5. So sometimes I would have to miss school, sometimes I wouldn't go to school. So then it was chaos.

      Time in US - education - employment

    6. I was the only one that talked English, and it was just hard.

      Time in US - learning/speaking English

    7. I used to cry sometimes, because I would wake up at 5:00 in the morning. I'm like, "Dude, I'm a little kid I don't deserve this." You know what I mean?

      Time in US - childhood - memories

    8. I was used to it at least, because growing up my mom didn't have a job so she couldn't provide for us even if she wanted to, because she's illegal. So what we would do is we would make fake CDs, and every morning I would just wake up, go to different little towns and stuff, sell CDs.

      Time in US - homelife - taking care of family - employment - job - responsibility

    1. His wife or his ex-wife was Mexican. He spoke perfect Spanish, so he and my mother were very—they would joke around. It was extremely funny to watch because when other people were around, this big, big figure would joke around with my mom and everyone would be like, "Oh, my God. What's happening?" But my mom was just that kind of person. His sons, I actually grew up with. I know his sons, extremely handsome, very educated people, very, very, very nice. I visited their home quite a few times in Hyde Park. They were great people.

      Time in the US - employment

  4. May 2021
    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 18). @danielmabuse yes, we all make mistakes, but a responsible actor also factors the kinds of mistakes she is prone to making into decisions on what actions to take: I’m not that great with my hands, so I never contemplated being a neuro-surgeon. Not everyone should be a public voice on COVID [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1329002783094296577

  5. Apr 2021
    1. The role of the terminal emulator process is:

      Shows the relationship between a "terminal emulator" and a pseudoterminal, as alluded to in the intro:

      is a pair of pseudo-devices, one of which, the slave, emulates a hardware text terminal device, the other of which, the master, provides the means by which a terminal emulator process controls the slave.

    1. Although echo "$@" prints the arguments with spaces in between, that's due to echo: it prints its arguments with spaces as separators.

      due to echo adding the spaces, not due to the spaces already being present

      Tag: not so much:

      whose responsibility is it? but more: what handles this / where does it come from? (how exactly should I word it?)

  6. Mar 2021
    1. The elimination of what is arguably the biggest monoculture in the history of software development would mean that we, the community, could finally take charge of both languages and run-times, and start to iterate and grow these independently of browser/server platforms, vendors, and organizations, all pulling in different directions, struggling for control of standards, and (perhaps most importantly) freeing the entire community of developers from the group pressure of One Language To Rule Them All.
  7. afarkas.github.io afarkas.github.io
    1. Webshim is also more than a polyfill, it has become a UI component and widget library. Webshim enables a developer to also enhance HTML5 capable browsers with more highly customizable, extensible and flexible UI components and widgets.

      And now that it's deprecated (presumably due to no longer needing these polyfills), not only do the polyfills go away (no longer maintained), but also these unrelated "extras" that some of us may have been depending on are now going away with no replacement ...

      If those were in a separate package, then there would have been some chance of the "extras" package being updated to work without the base webshims polyfills.

      In particular, I was using $.webshims.addCustomValidityRule which adds something that you can't do in plain HTML5 (that I can tell), so it isn't a polyfill...

    1. Using ::delegates works exactly like the Forwardable module in Ruby, with one bonus: It creates the accessors in a module, allowing you to override and call super in a user module or class.
  8. Feb 2021
    1. Maintaining the builds of your repositories should be everyone’s job. Instead of relying on that one build person in the team, Travis CI makes infrastructure and configuration a team responsibility.
    1. An endpoint links your routing with your business code. The idea is that your controllers are pure HTTP routers, calling the respective endpoint for each action. From there, the endpoint takes over, handles authentication, policies, executing the domain code, interpreting the result, and providing hooks to render a response.
    1. I am a delegation junkie. Whenever possible, I assign tasks and responsibilities originally assigned to me onto others.
    2. In the classroom, I delegate responsibilities to my students at a rate that astounds people. There is almost nothing that I will not allow my students to do, including teaching my lessons whenever possible. My students take full and complete ownership of the classroom, whether they like it or not, and as a result, they possess great ownership of their learning.
    3. They fail to understand the importance of autonomy when delegating responsibilities.
    4. They lack faith in the capacity of others.
    1. One of the main reasons to work with components is re-usability and portability, but also a delegation of responsibilities. Adding a component should be as easy as simply adding the component without having to know the inner workings (or markup) of this component. A consumer should only be aware of the properties, methods and events of a component. In order to style a child component one has to be aware of the markup as well, which violates this 'delegation of responsibility'-principle.
    1. with ActiveForm-Rails, validations is the responsability of the form and not of the models. There is no need to synchronize errors from the form to the models and vice versa.

      But if you intend to save to a model after the form validates, then you can't escape the models' validations:

      either you check that the models pass their own validations ahead of time (like I want to do, and I think @mattheworiordan was wanting to do), or you have to accept that one of the following outcomes is possible/inevitable if the models' own validations fail:

      1. if you use object.save then it may silently fail to save
      2. if you use object.save then it will fail to save and raise an error

      Are either of those outcomes acceptable to you? To me, they seem not to be. Hence we must also check for / handle the models' validations. Hence we need a way to aggregate errors from both the form object (context-specific validations) and from the models (unconditional/invariant validations that should always be checked by the model), and present them to the user.

      What do you guys find to be the best way to accomplish that?

      I am interested to know what best practices you use / still use today after all these years. I keep finding myself running into this same problem/need, which is how I ended up looking for what the current options are for form objects today...

    2. Trust me, I thought a lot about #validate and its semantics, and I am gonna make it even more "SRP" by making Form#errors and #valid? semi-public. All that happens via #validate reducing the possible wrong usage for users.
    3. About #validate which fill attributes of the form, I think it's a problem of architecture and clarity. If you respect the Single Responsabilty Principle, you must to have two methods. This is wrong. SRP means your class does exactly one thing, which is reflected in a single public method. The more methods you expose, the less SRP you go.
    4. About #validate which fill attributes of the form, I think it's a problem of architecture and clarity. If you respect the Single Responsabilty Principle, you must to have two methods. The validate method do two thing really different.
    1. Now let me ask you, do you write JS for a single page application differently from a "traditional" web application? I sure hope you do! In a "traditional" application, you can get away with being sloppy because every time the user navigates to a new page, their browser destroys the DOM and the JavaScript context. SPAs, though, require a more thoughtful approach.
    2. where's the code that unloads the table-sorter plugin when the page unloads? There isn't any. There didn't need to be back in the day because the browser handled the cleanup. However, in a single-page application like Turbolinks, the browser doesn't handle it. You, the developer, have to manage initialization and cleanup of your JavaScript behaviors.
    3. When people try to port traditional web apps to Turbolinks, they often run into problems because their JS never cleans up after itself.
    4. All Turbolinks-friendly JavaScript needs to: Initialize itself when a page is displayed Clean up after itself before Turbolinks navigates to a new page.
  9. Jan 2021
    1. They can tackle all aspects of a problem, from initial data collection and data conditioning to drawing conclusions. They can think outside the box to come up with new ways to view the problem, or to work with very broadly defined problems: ‘here's a lot of data, what can you make from it?’"

      Data scientists are not just hired to mine and run the data, they are also making the decisions that the data has directed them to. They can do this by making data visuals to show their colleagues that will lead to the best decisions for the company.

  10. Dec 2020
    1. Or maybe a better standard was in the humanitarian world. “There’s a core ethical principle called the responsibility to protect, which is about organizations having a primary responsibility to protect their own personnel,” said Abramowitz. “What’s very clear is that many teachers are distrustful because they have been in deeply unsafe situations for a very long time.” Teachers are asked to deal with school shootings, violent children, aggressive adults, poverty, online bullying—a host of complex social problems that aren’t part of their job description, she said. “Educators are so abandoned, they no longer trust in their own system to protect them.
    1. it focuses on compiling non-standard language extensions: JSX, TypeScript, and Flow. Because of this smaller scope, Sucrase can get away with an architecture that is much more performant but less extensible
  11. Nov 2020
    1. Svelte by itself is great, but doing a complete PWA (with service workers, etc) that runs and scales on multiple devices with high quality app-like UI controls quickly gets complex. Flutter just provides much better tooling for that out of the box IMO. You are not molding a website into an app, you are just building an app. If I was building a relatively simple web app that is only meant to run on the web, then I might still prefer Svelte in some cases.
    1. anyone else can challenge those boundaries
    2. in outsourcing is that we’ve placed the outsourced activities outside of our control, but they’re still inside our ‘boundary of identity’ – what others see and experience as ‘us

      This is one of the reasons why I was hesitating in the past years to offer bundled services in domain where I lack the necessary capabilities (e.g. act like a software development studio/agency, without know how to code & test code).

      Many years ago I was thinking about this that if way too many core variables are outside of my control (or our control as a team), there's no way to take responsibility for the results/outcomes (e.g. accepting a revenue-sharing-like agreement).

  12. Oct 2020
    1. The great ones have a thought pro-cess, philosophy and habit all rolled into one that overshadows the rest: I am responsible.
    1. Take responsibility for your outgoing network traffic If you install software that interacts with other sites over the network, you should be aware how it works and what kind of traffic it generates. If it has the potential to make thousands of requests to other sites, make sure it uses an HTTP cache to prevent inflicting abuse on other sites.
    2. Identify your user agents When deploying software that makes requests to other sites, you should set a custom User-Agent header to identify the software and provide a means to contact its maintainers. Many of the automated requests we receive have generic user-agent headers such as Java/1.6.0 or Python-urllib/2.1 which provide no information on the actual software responsible for making the requests.
    1. One of the primary tasks of engineers is to minimize complexity. JSX changes such a fundamental part (syntax and semantics of the language) that the complexity bubbles up to everything it touches. Pretty much every pipeline tool I've had to work with has become far more complex than necessary because of JSX. It affects AST parsers, it affects linters, it affects code coverage, it affects build systems. That tons and tons of additional code that I now need to wade through and mentally parse and ignore whenever I need to debug or want to contribute to a library that adds JSX support.
    1. Instead of using classes and local state, Deku just uses functions and pushes the responsibility of all state management and side-effects onto tools like Redux.
    1. A class should only have a single responsibility, that is, only changes to one part of the software's specification should be able to affect the specification of the class.
  13. Sep 2020
    1. But this is only a halfway decent way to clarify that this is an external dependency, because the only way to resolve a peer dependency warning is to install react from npm—there's no way to notify npm that you resolve the dependency to a browser global. So peer dependencies should be avoided in favor of external declarations. Then Rollup will take care of warning about "unresolved dependencies", even if external declarations can't express a particular version range with which your library is compatible like peer dependencies can.

      Interesting. Didn't realize. From my perspective, I usually do install packages via npm, so wouldn't have known about this problem.

      npm and rollup both try to solve this problem but in different ways that apparently conflict? So if a lib author lists peerDependencies then it can cause problems for those getting lib via browser (CDN)? How come so many libs use it then? How come I've never heard of this problem before?

    1. Then, the projects that use these libraries get to process these import statements how they like when they are bundled. For the ones that wish to load jQuery from a global, we again mark 'jquery' as an external—since we still don't want Rollup to bundle jQuery—and as a global.
    1. The RFC is more appropriate because it does not allow a parent to abritrarily control anything below it, that responsibility still relies on the component itself. Just because people have been passing classes round and overriding child styles for years doesn't mean it is a good choice and isn't something we wnat to encourage.
    2. margin, flex, position, left, right, top, bottom, width, height, align-self, justify-self among other is CSS properties that should never be modified by the child itself. The parent should always have control of those properties, which is the whole reason I'm asking for this.
    1. You must: reference each element you are extending using refs or an id add code in your oncreate and ondestroy for each element you are extending, which could become quite a lot if you have a lot of elements needing extension (anchors, form inputs, etc.)
    2. This is where hooks/behaviors are a good idea. They clean up your component code a lot. Also, it helps a ton since you don't get create/destroy events for elements that are inside {{#if}} and {{#each}}. That could become very burdensome to try and add/remove functionality with elements as they are added/removed within a component.
    1. I don’t want my source to be human-readable, not for protective reasons, but because I care about web performance more. I want my website to arrive at light speed on a tiny spec of magical network packet dust and blossom into a complete website. Or do whatever computer science deems is the absolute fastest way to send website data between computers. I’m much more worried about the state of web performance than I am about web education. But even if I was very worried about web education, I don’t think it’s the network’s job to deliver teachability
  14. Aug 2020
    1. I don't think it should be the individual application's responsibility to add Cache-Control: Vary when that negotiation/routing is done by Rails on behalf of the app, do you?
    2. At a certain point it is up to the application to specify when they're varying.
  15. Jul 2020
  16. Jun 2020
  17. May 2020
    1. Monitor what others are doing on your behalf.Even if you’ve out-sourced your email marketing to another company, the law may hold both you and the other company responsible.
  18. Apr 2020
    1. Other sites could absolutely spend time crawling for new lists of breached passwords and then hashing and comparing against their own. However this is an intensive process and I'm sure both Facebook and Google have a team dedicated to account security with functions like this.
    2. Ultimately it comes down to how much time and money you can dedicate to keeping your users' accounts secure versus how important it is to do so. Google and Facebook accounts sit at the centre of many users' internet lives and would be devastating to use. Same for most email accounts.
    1. Without passing any judgement on any third party developers, we have to advise people to never enter their 1Password Master Passwords into anything other than 1Password. I have no reason to doubt the integrity or competence of these third party developers, and RogueLazer’s project is even open-source. But it would be irresponsible for us to do anything other than advise you never to give your 1Password Master Password to anyone or any other application.
    1. Covid-19 is an emergency on such a huge scale that, if anonymity is managed appropriately, internet giants and social media platforms could play a responsible part in helping to build collective crowd intelligence for social good, rather than profit
  19. Mar 2020