24 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
  2. May 2021
  3. Apr 2021
    1. Although echo "$@" prints the arguments with spaces in between, that's due to echo: it prints its arguments with spaces as separators.

      due to echo adding the spaces, not due to the spaces already being present

      Tag: not so much:

      whose responsibility is it? but more: what handles this / where does it come from? (how exactly should I word it?)

  4. Mar 2021
  5. Feb 2021
    1. with ActiveForm-Rails, validations is the responsability of the form and not of the models. There is no need to synchronize errors from the form to the models and vice versa.

      But if you intend to save to a model after the form validates, then you can't escape the models' validations:

      either you check that the models pass their own validations ahead of time (like I want to do, and I think @mattheworiordan was wanting to do), or you have to accept that one of the following outcomes is possible/inevitable if the models' own validations fail:

      1. if you use object.save then it may silently fail to save
      2. if you use object.save then it will fail to save and raise an error

      Are either of those outcomes acceptable to you? To me, they seem not to be. Hence we must also check for / handle the models' validations. Hence we need a way to aggregate errors from both the form object (context-specific validations) and from the models (unconditional/invariant validations that should always be checked by the model), and present them to the user.

      What do you guys find to be the best way to accomplish that?

      I am interested to know what best practices you use / still use today after all these years. I keep finding myself running into this same problem/need, which is how I ended up looking for what the current options are for form objects today...

  6. Jan 2021
  7. Nov 2020
  8. Oct 2020
  9. Sep 2020
    1. But this is only a halfway decent way to clarify that this is an external dependency, because the only way to resolve a peer dependency warning is to install react from npm—there's no way to notify npm that you resolve the dependency to a browser global. So peer dependencies should be avoided in favor of external declarations. Then Rollup will take care of warning about "unresolved dependencies", even if external declarations can't express a particular version range with which your library is compatible like peer dependencies can.

      Interesting. Didn't realize. From my perspective, I usually do install packages via npm, so wouldn't have known about this problem.

      npm and rollup both try to solve this problem but in different ways that apparently conflict? So if a lib author lists peerDependencies then it can cause problems for those getting lib via browser (CDN)? How come so many libs use it then? How come I've never heard of this problem before?

    1. Then, the projects that use these libraries get to process these import statements how they like when they are bundled. For the ones that wish to load jQuery from a global, we again mark 'jquery' as an external—since we still don't want Rollup to bundle jQuery—and as a global.
    1. The RFC is more appropriate because it does not allow a parent to abritrarily control anything below it, that responsibility still relies on the component itself. Just because people have been passing classes round and overriding child styles for years doesn't mean it is a good choice and isn't something we wnat to encourage.
    2. margin, flex, position, left, right, top, bottom, width, height, align-self, justify-self among other is CSS properties that should never be modified by the child itself. The parent should always have control of those properties, which is the whole reason I'm asking for this.
    1. I don’t want my source to be human-readable, not for protective reasons, but because I care about web performance more. I want my website to arrive at light speed on a tiny spec of magical network packet dust and blossom into a complete website. Or do whatever computer science deems is the absolute fastest way to send website data between computers. I’m much more worried about the state of web performance than I am about web education. But even if I was very worried about web education, I don’t think it’s the network’s job to deliver teachability
  10. Aug 2020
    1. I don't think it should be the individual application's responsibility to add Cache-Control: Vary when that negotiation/routing is done by Rails on behalf of the app, do you?
    2. At a certain point it is up to the application to specify when they're varying.