33 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
  2. Sep 2019
    1. Variation in Rates of Fatal Police Shootings across US States:the Role of Firearm Availability

      Hello! This article is about the relationship between firearm prevalence (the IV) and the rates of fatal police shootings (the DV). The authors hypothesize that the greater the prevalence of firearms, the grater the rates of fatal police shooting.

      This article follows the classical structure of social science research -- abstract, introduction, literature review/theory, research design, findings, and conclusions.

  3. Jul 2019
  4. May 2019
  5. Apr 2019
    1. In a new article, the New York Times details a little-known technique increasingly used by law enforcement to figure out everyone who might have been within certain geographic areas during specific time periods in the past. The technique relies on detailed location data collected by Google from most Android devices as well as iPhones and iPads that have Google Maps and other apps installed. This data resides in a Google-maintained database called “Sensorvault,” and because Google stores this data indefinitely, Sensorvault “includes detailed location records involving at least hundreds of millions of devices worldwide and dating back nearly a decade.”

      Google is passing on location data to law enforcement without letting users know.

  6. Jul 2018
    1. “The black above represents citizens,” he said, “and the black below represents criminals.” That those on the wrong side of the line are typically citizens themselves doesn’t bother Jacob, who has built a thriving business, Thin Blue Line USA
  7. Jun 2018
    1. police and prisons are key vectors of violence in daily life.
    2. Some people have called for police departments to become more knowledgeable about current technology, and for lawmakers to create harsher punishments for people who are committing violence online. But the problems with this approach mirror those that are rampant in enforcement of sexual assault laws.
  8. Sep 2017
  9. Oct 2016
    1. we are more likely to be killed by law enforcement than any other group

      This article seems to be the source of this statistic. As they note, it's a hard number to come by because the crime is neither well-covered in the media nor well-reported by the authorities. Regardless, though, given the centuries-long and wildly painful indigenous struggle in the US, this certainly deserves our attention.

  10. Jul 2016
    1. When you ask why such "bad" cops are  armed and allowed to patrol the streets, one begins to see that lurking beneath this violence is a fiscal menace.

      It is not fair to our cops to be under so much pressure! I am so relieved this article has pointed out the need to address the root of the problem, rather than simply get caught up in the tired "all lives matter" and so on take. This is very refreshing. I hope we all work to address this locally. Reduce fines. Reduce crime. Reduce the danger to our beloved force AND people. Do not expect them to become cash cows with their lives on the line. IMHO

  11. May 2016
    1. "Historic trove of documents discovered in city attic," Herald.ie (2016-05-16) http://www.herald.ie/news/historic-trove-of-documents-discovered-in-city-attic-34707155.html

      The four missing volumes of Prisoner Books listing the arrests of more than 30,000 people between 1905 and 1918 include the "crimes" of labour leaders Jim Larkin (seditious conspiracy), James Connolly (incitement to crime), revolutionary Maud Gonne MacBride (defence of the realm), and suffragette Hanna Sheehy-Skeffington (glass-breaking with other suffragettes).

    2. "Poverty, manslaughter and stealing apples: police records shed light on Dublin 100 years ago," journal.ie (2015-05-14) http://www.thejournal.ie/police-records-arrests-100-years-ago-dublin-2765946-May2016/

      LIFE IN DUBLIN in the early 20th century was tough, especially given the huge class divide. However, it was also a time of remarkable change. Newly-released digitised Dublin Metropolitan Police records show us what life was like from 1905 to 1918. The records cover some of Dublin’s major historical events, including the 1913 Lockout, the 1916 Rising and its aftermath. Over 30,000 people were arrested during this period and these details are all contained in the records.

      Sean Lemass' arrest (down as John Lemass) fifth row from the bottom.

    3. "Thousands of files containing details of prisoners arrested during 1913 Lockout, Easter Rising published online," RTÉ Six-One News (2016-05-11) [flash video]

      http://www.rte.ie/news/player/2016/0511/20986024-thousands-of-files-containing-details-of-prisoners-arrested-during-1913-lockout-easter-rising-published-online/

      RTÉ Six-One News report on the restoration of DMP Prisoners Books to the Garda Museum and Archives, and launch of the four digitised volumes of Dublin Metropolitan Police prisoner books from the Irish revolutionary period.

    4. "UCD Library Cultural Heritage: Launch of the Dublin Metropolitan Police Prisoners Books." Flickr (2015-05-11)

      Flickr album of photographs from the SPITU-sponsored launch of the digital DMP Prisoners Books at Liberty Hall, Dublin.

    5. "SIPTU presents historic DMP files to Garda and to UCD online library" (2016-05-11) http://www.siptu.ie/media/pressreleases2016/featurednews/fullstory_19808_en.html

      SIPTU presented ‘Prisoners Books’ concerning over 30,000 people arrested by the Dublin Metropolitan Police (DMP) between 1905 and 1918 to the Garda Síochána at a ceremony in Liberty Hall, Dublin, this morning (11th May).

    6. PULSE, 1916. http://www.broadsheet.ie/2016/05/11/fingers-on-the-pulse-of-1916/

      The Dublin Metropolitan Police (DMP) Prisoners Books for 1905-1908 and 1911-1918 are amongst the most valuable new documents to come to light on the revolutionary decade.

      They include important information on social and political life in the capital during the last years of the Union, from the period of widespread anticipation of Home Rule, to the advent of the 1913 Lockout, the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, the Easter Rising and its aftermath in 1916, and including the conscription crisis of 1918.

      They will also be invaluable to those interested in criminology, genealogy, and family history.

      The collection comprises of four large leather bound, double ledger volumes containing hand written entries that record the details of daily charge sheets issued by DMP members to offenders or alleged offenders.

      Each volume contains the name, age, address, occupation, alleged offence and, in most cases, outcome of cases involving over 30,000 people arrested by the DMP.

      Each volume also contains an index of prisoners with references to the pages containing details of the charge. The information in these volumes serves, therefore, to provide new perspectives on life in Dublin during a time of war and revolution.

    7. "Discovery of police files opens new chapter on Rising era," Irish Times (2016-05-11) http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/heritage/discovery-of-police-files-opens-new-chapter-on-rising-era-1.2644187

      Records found in Clontarf attic detail arrests of Larkin and Connolly during Dublin lockout

    8. Dublin Metropolitan Police's Prisoners Books released," Irish Geneology News (2016-05-12) http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/2016/05/dublin-metropolitan-polices-prisoners.html

      Launched yesterday at Liberty Hall, these records date from Ireland's revolutionary era and include all manner of crimes listed in register pages headed 'Prisoners charged with offences involving dishonesty'. ...

    9. "Dublin Metropolitan Police Prisoner Books 1905-1918," The British GENES blog (2016-05-12) http://britishgenes.blogspot.ie/2016/05/dublin-metropolitan-police-prisoner.html

      University College Dublin's Digital Library (http://digital.ucd.ie) has just uploaded digitised editions of four Dublin Metropolitan Police prisoners books from 1905-1908, and 1911-1918, at http://digital.ucd.ie/view/ucdlib:43945.

    10. "Historic police records showing Connolly and Larkin arrests found in skip," Irish Independent (2016-05-11) http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/historic-police-records-showing-connolly-and-larkin-arrests-found-in-skip-34707471.html

      The four missing volumes of 'Prisoner Books' listing the arrests of more than 30,000 people between 1905 and 1918 include the "crimes" of labour leaders Jim Larkin (seditious conspiracy), James Connolly (incitement to crime), revolutionary Maud Gonne MacBride (defence of the realm) and suffragette Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, (glass-breaking with other suffragettes).

    11. "Records of 1916 Rising arrests published online," Irish Examiner (2016-05-12)

      Reports containing details of 30,000 arrests by the Dublin Metropolitan Police more than 100 years ago have been published online, writes Dan Buckley.

      They contain details of prisoners during the Lockout of 1913, the outbreak of the First World War and the 1916 Easter Rising.

    12. "Dublin Metropolitan prisoner books available online," Irish Times (2016-05-11) http://www.rte.ie/news/2016/0511/787671-dublin-metropolitan-prisoners-books/

      Dublin Metropolitan Prisoners Books from over 100 years ago containing reports of over 30,000 arrests have been published online.

  12. Mar 2016
    1. "Police officers run to disorder. They run to the sound of shots," the chief said. "It's my sad duty to have to share with you that, circumstant

      what what

  13. Jan 2016
    1. Vigilant Solutions, a surveillance technology company, is making shady deals with police departments in Texas. They lend the police equipment and database access. The police use it to spot people with outstanding warrants, whom they can stop and take payments from by credit card -- with a 25% processing fee tacked on for the tech company. The company also intends to keep all the license plate data collected by the police.

  14. Dec 2015
    1. THE INTERCEPT HAS OBTAINED a secret, internal U.S. government catalogue of dozens of cellphone surveillance devices used by the military and by intelligence agencies.

      MANY OF THE DEVICES in the catalogue, including the Stingrays and dirt boxes, are cell-site simulators, which operate by mimicking the towers of major telecom companies like Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile.

      Today nearly 60 law enforcement agencies in 23 states are known to possess a Stingray or some form of cell-site simulator, though experts believe that number likely underrepresents the real total. In some jurisdictions, police use cell-site simulators regularly. The Baltimore Police Department, for example, has used Stingrays more than 4,300 times since 2007.

      “The same grant programs that paid for local law enforcement agencies across the country to buy armored personnel carriers and drones have paid for Stingrays,” said Soghoian.

      Police cite the war on terror as their reason for purchasing surveillance equipment. But they use it for domestic cases, including minor ones.

      “The full extent of the secrecy surrounding cell-site simulators is completely unjustified and unlawful,” said EFF’s Lynch. “No police officer or detective should be allowed to withhold information from a court or criminal defendant about how the officer conducted an investigation.”

  15. Nov 2015
    1. "swatting" - making a hoax call to a police department to trick them into sending a SWAT team to someone's home, business, or school. Apparently, this is not as hard as it should be. The hoaxer typically claims to be, or to know of, a gunman or bomber at the target address. They may say they have hostages, and threaten to kill police officers.

      The article is about one Canadian teenager who duped US police departments into sending SWAT teams to people's homes around 40 times.

  16. Jul 2015
  17. Apr 2015
    1. A further notification was then sent to commanding officers stating that references to enemy had now been changed to “criminal elements” in guard communications.

      Still heavily problematic. We're talking about citizens exercising their first amendment rights.

  18. Feb 2014
    1. MINTURN, J. The plaintiff occupied the position of a special police officer, in Atlantic City, and incidentally was identified with the work of the prosecutor of the pleas of the county. He possessed knowledge concerning the theft of certain diamonds and jewelry from the possession of the defendant, who had advertised a reward for the recovery of the property. In this situation he claims to have entered into a verbal contract with defendant, whereby she agreed to pay him $500 if he could procure for her the names and addresses of the thieves. As a result of his meditation with the police authorities the diamonds and jewelry were recovered, and plaintiff brought this suit to recover the promised reward.
      • Plaintiff makes a verbal contract with defendant. In return for $500, plaintiff will find defendant's stolen jewels.
      • Plaintiff had knowledge of whereabouts of jewels at contract formation.
      • Plaintiff is a special police officer and has dealings with prosecutor's office.
      • Defendant published advertisement for reward.
      • Plaintiff finds stolen goods and arranges return.